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K-12 Outreach: Lesson Plans

A significant part of the LAII's mission is to produce, enhance, and expand the information about Latin America that is presented in classrooms today. These lesson plans are a large part of this work. They represent extended explorations of themes that have ongoing importance throughout North, Central, and South America.

Some of the materials listed here were produced by us in conjunction with our professional development workshops. These lesson plans provide content area materials, primary source documents, literature guides, and hands-on classroom activities.

Upon occasion, we have also had the opportunity to make available lesson plans that were developed by New Mexico teachers in partnership with other programs at the University of New Mexico. Where this has been the case, we have identified the course instructor and individual teacher responsible for the work. If you are interested in making your materials available to the wider public, we encourage you to contact us to discuss sharing them here.

Resources

Viva la Revolución: An Educator's Guide to the Mexican Revolution

Viva la RevolucionIn February 2014, the LAII partnered with various community organizations to produce programming and K-12 teaching materials around the Mexican Revolution. This partnership involved the Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, Mexican Consulate of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, and the Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque. As a result of this partnership, the LAII produced an interdisciplinary and multifaceted educator's guide to encourage discussing the Mexican Revolution in K-12 classrooms. For more information, see the complete table of contents.

 

Image: Provided courtesy of the Fototeca of the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia.

Día de los Muertos

Dia de los MuertosEach year the LAII partners with the National Hispanic Cultural Center to celebrate and recognize the cultural heritage and practices associated with Día de los Muertos. Out of that partnership, the LAII produced a curriculum guide to provide hands-on art activities and literacy exercises to bring Día de los Muertos to the classroom. In addition, the NHCC developed a visually rich website to explore the rituals of remembrance and historical origins of the holiday. For more information, see the complete table of contents.

 

Image: Provided courtesy of Reid Rosenberg, reprinted here under CC ©.

In the Wake of Juárez: Teaching Politics Through Art

In the Wake of Juárez

Using the remarkable sgraffito drawings of artist Alice Leora Briggs, this guide reviews the sociocultural context of Ciudad Juárez, explores the violence inescapably evident in the city, and considers how students can personally identify with global issues through the medium of art Common Core-based curriculum strategies encourage students to engage with Briggs' artwork on personal and analytical levels. This material was developed in partnership with the UNM Art Museum and was based on the Art Museum's Spring 2013 exhibit of the same name. For more information, see the complete table of contents.

 

Image: Provided courtesy of Alice Leora Briggs, reprinted here with permission.

Stitching Resistance: Chilean Arpilleras

Stitching ResistanceThese resources focus on the history and sociopolitical context of the Chilean dictator, Pinochet, and the related art form known as arpilleras. Arpilleras, a type of textile, became the most visual (and visible), poignant, and widespread manifestation of opposition to authoritarianism, violation of human rights and the disappearance of loved ones associated with the military government that ruled Chile until 1990. For more information, see the complete table of contents.

 

 

Image: Pictured: Arpillera by Violeta Morales, Justice, 2006. Collection of Marjorie Agosín. Photograph by Addison Doty. Reprinted with permission from the NHCC.

Teaching About the U.S.-Mexico Border

Teaching About the U.S.-Mexico BorderThese resources encourage K-12 educators to think deeply about the U.S.-Mexico border - its history, how it developed, what it represents, and the ramifications it has had on the Mexican experience and on Mexico itself. The materials were developed in conjunction with a series of four professional development workshops held in Spring 2012. For more information, see the complete table of contents.

 

 

  • "The Border: Resources for Teaching," an online space dedicated to sharing educational resources for teachers who intend to explore the U.S.-Mexico border with their students.

Image: Provided courtesy of the artist, Fernando Delgado, reprinted here with permission.

Maskmaking, Art & Culture: Lesson Plans Inspired by Felipe Horta

Maskmaking, Art & CultureThis guide provides teachers with multiple hands-on and low-cost methods for implementing maskmaking within the classroom. In addition to the hands-on lesson plans, the guide also offers suggestions for how to match the activities with literacy- and cultural-based exercises. Specific emphasis is paid to how masks are used within Mexico in danzas held in relation to la pastorela celebrations. Felipe Horta, a mascarero from Tocuaro, Michoacan, Mexico, is the impetus behind the guide. Much of the curriculum is informed by his artesanía, its surrounding cultural context, and the underlying historical traditions. These materials were developed in conjunction with an initial visit and workshop with Felipe Horta held in Fall 2012. For more information, see the complete table of contents.

Image: Provided courtesy of Felipe Horta. Photograph by Lisa Geduldig.

Rethinking Columbus: The History of Indigenous Sovereignty and Agency in the Americas

Rethinking ColumbusThe Rethinking Columbus curriculum encourages teachers to reconsider the traditional or standard story/history of Christopher Columbus, and the ramifications that Columbus' explorations had on the Americas and its people. The teacher resource book Rethinking Columbus: The Next 500 Years (Rethinking Schools, Ltd, 1998) was the foundational influence behind the curriculum. Many of the activities are taken directly from that book or are expansions of topics discussed in it. The curriculum is designed so that all of the activities can be used in their entirety, or teachers can pick and choose the activities that best meet the needs of their curriculum and students. The majority of the activities can be adapted so that they can be used for all ages. The materials were produced for the first "Rethinking Columbus" workshop held by the LAII in Fall 2011. For more information, see the complete table of contents.

Image: Provided courtesy of Franco Folini, photograher, and original mural artist, Marta Ayala. Pictured: Mural titled "Roots and Frequencies Basic to Our Education."

The Conquests of Spanish America

The Conquests of Spanish AmericaThe Conquests of Spanish America curriculum units were written by teachers who were enrolled in History 686: The Conquests of Spanish America course with the UNM Department of History in Summer, 2009. With guidance from Dr. Kimberly Gauderman, these teachers created extensive lesson plans that linked New Mexico history to the conquest of Spanish America. With their permission, we share here the curriculum they developed in conjunction with the course. Suggested grades range from 5-12. For more information, see the complete table of contents.

 

Image: Provided courtesy of the World Digital Library. Pictured: General History of the Things of New Spain by Fray Bernardino de Sahagún: The Florentine Codex.

Educating Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

Educating Culturally and Linguistically Diverse StudentsThese multicultural curriculum units were written by pre-service teachers who were enrolled in LLSS 315: Educating Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students in the Language, Literacy and Social Cultural Studies Department during Fall 2012 and Spring 2013. With guidance from Katrina Dillon, these pre-service teachers created lesson plans that look at teaching younger students about race, culture, difference, acceptance, and respect. With their permission, we share here the curriculum they developed for the course. Suggested grades range from K-3. For more information, see the complete table of contents.