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Events: 2016

Jan 11

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In January we're reading Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2015-2016 Selected Titles.
Feb 1

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Tractor Brewing, 1800 4th St. NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In February we're reading Names on a Map by Benjamin Alire Sáenz.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2015-2016 Selected Titles.
Feb 3

Finalist Candidate Lecture for the Position of Assistant Professor of Latin American Development Planning: Sandra Pinel

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: George Pearl Hall, P104
Description: The Community and Regional Planning (CRP) program and the Latin American & Iberian Institute (LAII) are pleased to announce a presentation with Sandra Pinel, one of three final candidates for the position of Assistant Professor of Latin American Development Planning. Please join us as we hear her discuss "Beyond Participation: The Application of Ethnography to Decentralized Governance in the Southern Andean Páramo."
Sponsors: Community & Regional Planning Program, LAII
Notes: This presentation is free and open to the public. CRP and LAS students are invited to talk with the candidate at a private lunch to be held immediately following the lecture in the same room. Questions regarding the presentation or candidates may be direct to Liz Castillo (eac@unm.edu). For reference, please see the event flyer.
Feb 3

Field Research Grant Information and Help Session

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Please join us at the LAII for a session to review application guidelines, learn tips for writing research proposals, and ask questions about the LAII's field research grants. All first-time applicants are encouraged to attend.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.
Feb 4

LAII Lecture Series: Kris Lane -Corrupting the King's Blood - Interpreting the Great Potosi Mint Fraud of 1649

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation in which historian Dr. Kris Lane discusses the great Potosi mint fraud of 1649. Historians such as Geoffrey Parker have lately reminded us that the seventeenth century was tough worldwide. Famine, plague, even glacial advance made life hard from Europe to China. In Spain and its overseas dominions, this 'global crisis' was made worse by a massive fraud inside the Potosi mint, high in the mountains of what is today Bolivia. What brought the great fraud about, and how was it disarticulated? What were the long-term consequences of the fraud and its aftermath? Was colonial corruption to blame?
Lane holds the France V. Scholes Chair in Colonial Latin American History at Tulane University in New Orleans, where he directs the graduate program. His books include Quito 1599: City & Colony in Transition (University of New Mexico), Colour of Paradise: The Emerald in the Age of Gunpowder Empires (Yale), and (with Matthew Restall) Latin America in Colonial Times (Cambridge). Lane also edits the journal Colonial Latin American Review. His current project, based in Bolivia, traces the history of the great Potosi mint fraud of 1649 and its global consequences.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Feb 4

Finalist Candidate Lecture for the Position of Assistant Professor of Latin American Development Planning: Jennifer Tucker

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: George Pearl Hall, P133
Description: The Community and Regional Planning (CRP) program and the Latin American & Iberian Institute (LAII) are pleased to announce a presentation with Sandra Pinel, one of three final candidates for the position of Assistant Professor of Latin American Development Planning. Please join us as we hear her discuss "Livelihood Outside the Law: Street Vendor Politics and Everyday Planning Practice in Ciudad del Este, Paraguay."
Sponsors: Community & Regional Planning Program, LAII
Notes: This presentation is free and open to the public. CRP and LAS students are invited to talk with the candidate at a private lunch to be held immediately following the lecture in the same room. Questions regarding the presentation or candidates may be direct to Liz Castillo (eac@unm.edu). For reference, please see the event flyer.
Feb 8

Finalist Candidate Lecture for the Position of Assistant Professor of Latin American Development Planning: Elizabeth Mason-Deese

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: George Pearl Hall, P133
Description: The Community and Regional Planning (CRP) program and the Latin American & Iberian Institute (LAII) are pleased to announce a presentation with Elizabeth Mason-Deese, one of three final candidates for the position of Assistant Professor of Latin American Development Planning. Please join us as we hear her discuss "Community Responses to Economic Crisis: Self-Management and Solidarity in Argentina's Unemployed Workers' Organizations."
Sponsors: Community & Regional Planning Program, LAII
Notes: This presentation is free and open to the public. CRP and LAS students are invited to talk with the candidate at a private lunch to be held immediately following the lecture in the same room. Questions regarding the presentation or candidates may be direct to Liz Castillo (eac@unm.edu). For reference, please see event flyer.
Feb 9

Omar Díaz - Cuban Art from the Collections of the National Museum of Fine Arts

Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Location: Tamarind Institute
Description: Please join Curator Omar Díaz from the National Museum of Fine Arts, Havana, Cuba, for a conversation about Cuban art. Using examples from the museum’s collection, he will highlight the evolution of artistic trends in Cuba, and how they are reflected in the work of the best contemporary artists in Cuba today. The National Museum of Fine Arts of Havana exhibits Cuban art collections from the Colonial times up to contemporary generations, and since its founding in 1913 has been Cuba’s most notable and supportive art institution.
Sponsors: Tamarind Institute, LAII
Notes: This is a free event open to the public.
Feb 22

Feminist Research Institute Lecture Series: Silvia Hirsch: Sexual and Reproductive Health Practices and Beliefs Among Young Indigenous Women in Northwest Argentina

Time: 3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Location: History Department Common Room, Mesa Vista Hall 1104
Description: Join the Feminist Research Institute for presentation wih Dr. Sivia Hirsch of the Universidad Nacional de San Martin in Argentina. Hirsch will discuss how the sexual and reproductive health of indigenous women is influenced by "traditional" knowledge and practices but is also mediated by the intervention of public health programs. Dr. Hirsch's talk will explore how indigenous women from northern Argentina undergo reproductive processes (menstruation, pregnancy, childbirth, use of contraceptive methods), make decisions on whether to adhere to traditional knowledge while complying with the authoritative knowledge of the public health system. The talk will also underscore the role of the State in constructing ways of treating diversity in contexts of inequality.
Sponsors: Feminist Research Institute, Latin American & Iberian Institute, Department of OB/GYN, College of Nursing, International Studies Institute, College of Education: LLSS, Southwest Hispanic Research Institute, Department of History, and Department of Anthropology.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Feb 23

CNM•UNM LAS Speaker Series: Ana Alonso-Minutti: Performing Resistance: Quanta and the Experimental Music Scene of 1970s Mexico

Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Main Campus, Max Salazar (MS) Building, Room 201
Description: Join the CNM and UNM Latin American Studies programs for a jointly sponsored lecture with Dr. Ana Alonso-Minutti, Assistant Professor of Musicology and faculty affiliate of the Latin American & Iberian Institute at UNM. In this presentation, Alonso-Minutti will discuss how Quanta, a collective improvisation group, became a pioneering ensemble by holding daily street performances in Mexico City. Performing on the streets opened sites of contradiction, where social expectations and musical traditions collided. Alonso-Minutti argues that Quanta performed experimentalism by negotiating an ambivalent place in the official discourses of the musical avant-garde and at the same time by adopting a subversive attitude that echoed that of a youth counterculture thirsty for social change.
Sponsors: LAII, CNM Latin American Studies Program
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the flyer for this lecture or the whole Spring 2016 Speaker Series flyer. For information concerning parking, please see the CNM's Visitor Parking guidelines.
Feb 24

Film Screening and K-12 Educator's Workshop: Who is Dayani Cristal?

Time: 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Bank of America Theater
Description: The LAII is pleased to present this free, educational screening of the award-winning documentary Who is Dayani Cristal? in collaboration with Instituto Cervantes' ¡Cine Magnífico! Albuquerque Latino Film Festival. As the educational partner for the film festival, the LAII proudly supports educational programming throughout the year to support learning about Latin America through film. For this screening, we bring you a documentary that humanizes the otherwise dehumanizing depictions of immigration from Central America to the United States.
Sponsors: LAII, Instituto Cervantes and the ¡Cine Magnífico Film Festival, National Hispanic Cultural Center, and the Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque
Notes: This event is free and open to the public, but we ask that you RSVP in advance. Please visit our registration site to confirm your space. For reference, see the event flyer.
Feb 26

History Colloquium: Isabella Cosse: Global Mafalda: Latin America, Cultural Contestation, and Transnational Connections

Time: 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: History Department Common Room, Mesa Vista Hall 1104
Description: Join the Spring 2016 History Colloquium for a presentation by Dr. Isabella Cosse, professor at the University of Buenos Aires and a member of the Instituto Interdisciplinario de Estudios de Genero. Cosse has published a large collection of papers on women and gender, popular culture, class and social movements in Argentina. As well, she is the author of the books Mafalda: historia social y política (2014); Pareja, sexualidad y familia enlos años sesenta (2010); Estigmas de nacimiento. Peronismo y orden familiar (1946-1955) (2006); 1975: Año de la Orientalidad: Identidad, memoria e historia en una dictadura (1996), and many other titles. Dr. Cosse will be discussing her paper, "Global Mafalda: Latin America, Cultural Contestation, and Transnational Connections," which uses Latin America's most beloved and best-selling comic strip, Mafalda, as a vehicle to discuss themes such as cultural contestation and transformation connections in Latin America.
Sponsors: Department of History, Feminist Research Institute, and the Latin American and Iberian Institute
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Mar 2

Interdisciplinary Lecture Series in Linguistics: Christopher Koops and Damián Wilson: Mapping attitudes in the Land of EEE!! - Perceptions of language variation in New Mexico

Time: 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Location: Ortega Hall, Reading Room
Description: Join us for a lecture in the Interdisciplinary Lecture Series in Linguistics which considers where New Mexicans imagine NM speech communities. More than 400 New Mexico residents, including many UNM students, produced hand-drawn maps of the state showing “where people speak differently” and what they speak or sound like. Their perceptions were aggregated using GIS (Geographic Information Systems) tools. The resulting “perceptual dialectology” (Preston 1989) of New Mexico provides insights into spatialized language ideologies and the different ways in which they are constructed.
Sponsors: Department of Linguistics, High Desert Linguistics Society, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, and the Latin American & Iberian Institute
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Mar 2

LAII Lecture Series: Ricky Lee Allen: Transforming the Loveless Society: Psychoanalysis in the Work of Paulo Freire

Time: 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation in which education scholar Dr. Ricky Lee Allen discusses psychoanalysis in Paulo Freire's work. Allen contends that the psychoanalytic dimension of Freire's work is understudied, and this must be remedied to realize the fuller potential of critical pedagogy. Oppressive societies are loveless arrangements caught up in psychosocial cycles of abuse, terror, surveillance, and violence. Allen seeks to disrupt this reality through an amplification of the psychoanalytic theory at the heart of Freire's work. He will look at the links to Frantz Fanon, Albert Memmi, and Erich Fromm. Finally, he will suggest a transformation of the loveless society through a critical pedagogy of healing.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This is a free event open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 3

Musicology Colloquium - Leonora Saavedra: Musicology and the Exhausted Nation

Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Join the Department of Music for a presentation in which Dr. Leonora Saavedra discusses how, in the 1990s, Rogers Brubaker decried the new popularity of nationalism as an academic topic within musicology, where "analytical primitivism has been introduced through the highly selective appropriation of the historical and social scientific literature on nationalism." Was Brubaker's criticism warranted? Taking the case of Mexico as a test ground, Saveedra will take stock of some of the results of musicology's brief infatuation with nationalism, and address the gains made as well as the opportunities lost.
Saavedra is Associate Professor of Music at the University of California Riverside. Her research centers upon Mexican music of the late-19th and 20th centuries, exoticism, nationalism and modernism, and the relations between Mexico and the United States. Recent publications include "Carlos Chávez's Polysemic Style: Constructing the National, Seeking the Cosmopolitan" (Journal of the American Musicological Society, 2015) and "El nuevo pasado mexicano: estrategias de representación en Atzimba de Ricardo Castro" (Resonancias, 2014). She is the editor of Carlos Chávez and His World (Princeton University Press, 2015).
Sponsors: College of Fine Arts, Department of Music, LAII, Center for Southwest Research
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Mar 3

K-12 Educator's Workshop: ESL Games for 21st Century Brains

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a free professional development workshop focused on ESL games for 21st century brains. Award winning artist/educator, Agnes Chavez, will share her latest 21st century activities for teaching a second language to children (Spanish/English). These activities bring together the worlds of (1) the arts, (2) STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), and (3) 21st century thinking. Working from her new ebook, “ESL Games for 21st Century Brains,” as well as from her “Sube Teach Language through Art, Music and Games Language Kit,” she will lead a hands-on workshop that engages teachers in playful art-based learning. Teachers walk away with hands-on activities and strategies for applying 21st century thinking to the language classroom. Certificates of professional development and refreshments will be provided.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: The event is free and open to all educators, but registration is required. Please RSVP at the event registration website. For reference, see the event flyer.
Mar 7

LAII Lecture Series: James McGuire - Politics, Gender, and Health: Insight from Argentina's Provinces

Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation in which Dr. James W. McGuire will discuss the intersection of politics, gender, and health in Argentina’s provinces. The association between women’s legislative representation and health outcomes is of long-standing interest in comparative politics. In Argentina, provincial governments administer most health care delivery, schooling, water provision, sanitation, and other services that affect health care utilization and population health status. The obtained associations between women’s legislative representation and health outcomes are remarkable in view of the length and complexity of the causal chain linking women’s legislative representation to health status.
James W. McGuire is Professor and Chair in the Department of Government at Wesleyan University. He specializes in the comparative politics of developing countries, with a particular focus on democracy, social welfare policies, and public health. He is the author of Peronism without Perón: Unions, Parties, and Democracy in Argentina (Stanford University Press, 1997) and of Wealth, Health, and Democracy in East Asia and Latin America (Cambridge University Press, 2010), which won the 2011 Stein Rokkan Prize for Comparative Social Science Research. McGuire is a recipient of Wesleyan's Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of Political Science, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at UNM
Notes: This is a free event open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.For other events focused on similar themes, see the speaker series flyer for Emerging Politics of Latin America.
Mar 7

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In March we're reading Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings by Margarita Engle.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2015-2016 Selected Titles.
Mar 8

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Exploring Immigration and Identity

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: This free professional development workshop will encourage teachers to think deeply about immigration in the Americas by moving past the dehumanizing media discourse to consider the foreign policy, national histories, and personal experiences of Central American youth who come to the United States without documentation. UNM faculty will offer an interdisciplinary panel presentation on the root causes of poverty and violence that have prompted many youth and adults to make the perilous journey north, with special attention paid to how U.S. foreign policy has contributed to these conditions. Afterward, LAII staff will provide relevant curriculum resources and discuss strategies to support teaching about this topic in the elementary, middle, and high school classrooms.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: Certificates of professional development and refreshments will be provided. The event is free and open to all educators, but registration is required. Please RSVP at the event registration website. For reference, see the event flyer.
Mar 9

Film Screening and K-12 Educator's Workshop: Pelo Malo

Time: 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Bank of America Theater
Description: The LAII is pleased to present this free, educational screening of the award-winning Venezuelan feature film Pelo Malo in collaboration with Instituto Cervantes’ ¡Cine Magnífico! Albuquerque Latino Film Festival. As the educational partner for the film festival, the LAII proudly supports educational programming to support learning about Latin America through film. As NPR wrote in its review, this film "is a rare look into identity politics among Latin Americans, where racism is often a taboo topic." By presenting a panorama of intimate stories set in the heart and urban grittiness of Caracas, this film brings Latin American issues of race, racism, and identity to the forefront. Following the film, we invite all K-12 educator to stay on for a discussion about the film and how it can be used in the classroom.
Sponsors: LAII, Instituto Cervantes and the ¡Cine Magnífico Film Festival, National Hispanic Cultural Center, and the Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque
Notes: This event is free and open to the public, but we ask that you RSVP in advance. Please visit our registration site to confirm your space. For reference, see the event flyer.
March 21

Reception: "Mensajes del Corazón" Student Art Exhibit

Time: 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: The UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute is pleased to announce "Mensajes del corazón," an exhibit of arpillera-inspired artwork created by fourth grade students at East San Jose Elementary School in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The exhibit is comprised of nearly 100 textiles expressing the students' concerns about and hopes for their community and the broader world. Join us for a community reception to celebrate their achievements. Dr. Elizabeth Hutchison of the UNM Department of History and Dr. Tey Nunn of the National Hispanic Cultural Center Art Museum, will join us for remarks.
Sponsors: LAII, East San Jose Elementary School
Notes: This is a free event open to the public. Please see the event flyer for reference. All are welcome and invited to attend!
Mar 23

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Art with Meaning: Social Consciousness in the Classroom

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: Albuquerque Museum of Art and History, 2000 Mountain Rd NW
Description: This free professional development workshop will consider the many ways in which artists convey meaning. Drawing inspiration from the Latin American artists and art on display in New Territories: Laboratories for Design, Craft and Art in Latin America, an exhibit on display through April 17 at The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History, participants will explore the notion of art as social consciousness; question accepted definitions of art and creativity; and share in strategies for encouraging students to engage in purposeful, meaningful, and socially responsible thinking across all content areas, from literature to social studies. The evening will begin in the exhibit space with a discussion led by Sara Otto-Diniz, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, UNM Museum Studies. Afterward, staff from the Latin American & Iberian Institute and Albuquerque Museum will offer ideas for curricular connections and alignment to the standards. Finally, we will conclude with time for reflection and hands-on activities using repurposed/upcycled materials under the instruction of Emma Lee Clark, MA Art Education, Cultural Arts and Education Specialist at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center.
Sponsors: The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History and the LAII.
Notes: Certificates of professional development and dinner will be provided. The event is free and open to all educators, but registration is required. Please RSVP at the event registration website. For reference, see the event flyer.
Mar 24

LAII Lecture Series: Alfred P. Montero – Brazilian Democracy at the Crossroads: The Normalization of Crisis or the Democratization of the Normal?

Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation in which Dr. Alfred P. Montero discusses the state of Brazilian democracy in the face of corruption accusations. Brazil has been a democracy for over thirty years (1985-present), the longest period it has been so in its history. Yet, once again, national corruption scandals involving elected officials, including the presidency, have engulfed the political system. Foreign and domestic observers have concluded that Brazilian democracy is imperiled by decaying and obsolete political institutions badly in need of reform. At the same time, investigations into corruption have strengthened networks of accountability, thereby enhancing the quality of the country’s democracy. Brazilian democracy will remain at a crossroads but it may also enjoy the emergence of new norms and institutions that will deepen democratic forms and prevent future corrupt practices by politicians and big business.
Alfred P. Montero is the Frank B. Kellogg Chair of Political Science at Carleton College. His main research areas are the political economy of South American countries and the quality of democracy. He is the author of Brazil: Reversal of Fortune (Polity Press, 2014), Brazilian Politics: Reforming a Democratic State in a Changing World (Polity Press, 2006), Shifting States in Global Markets: Subnational Industrial Policy in Contemporary Brazil and Spain (Penn State University Press, 2002), and he is co-editor with David J. Samuels of Decentralization and Democracy in Latin America (University of Notre Dame Press, 2004). Montero’s research has been published in several scholarly journals and he is the new senior editor of the refereed journal, Latin American Politics and Society.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of Political Science
Notes: This is a free event open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.For other events focused on similar themes, see the speaker series flyer for Emerging Politics of Latin America.
Mar 25

LAII Lecture Series (Workshop): Alfred P. Montero– Strategies for Publishing in Peer-Reviewed Journals in Political Science: Insights from the Editor of Latin American Politics and Society

Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Social Sciences Building (SSCO), Room 2069
Description: Join us for a workshop with Dr. Alfred P. Montero in which he discusses insights gained as an author published in several scholarly journals and as the new senior editor of the refereed journal, Latin American Politics and Society. Graduate students in particular are encouraged to attend.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of Political Science
Notes: This is a free event open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.For other events focused on similar themes, see the speaker series flyer for Emerging Politics of Latin America.
Mar 25

SOLAS Sin Fronteras Film Festival: Relatos Salvajes

Time: 6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
Location: Guild Cinema (3405 Central Ave NE)
Description: Join the UNM Student Organization for Latin American Studies (SOLAS) for the 2016 Sin Fronteras Film Festival. The film festival was started by SOLAS in 2005 and was the first New Mexico film festival to exclusively feature Latino films and filmmakers. Each year, the festival presents films, documentaries, animations and short films with the purpose of increasing awareness of Hispanic and indigenous cultures of Latin America. This year the festival kicks off with a screening of Relatos Salvajes, an Argentine-Spanish black comedy anthology film composed of six standalone shorts, all written and directed by Damián Szifron, united by a common theme of violence and vengeance: "Pasternak," "Las Ratas (The Rats)," "El Más Fuerte (The Strongest)," "Bombita (Little Bomb)," "La Propuesta (The Proposal)," and "Hasta que la muerte nos separe (Until Death Do Us Part)."
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII, Guild Cinema, School of Law, El Centro de la Raza, Department of Sociology, and the Department of Geography & Environmental Studies.
Notes: The entire festival is free of charge and open to the public. For more information and film trailers, visit the SOLAS website. For reference, see the film festival poster.
Mar 26

SOLAS Sin Fronteras Film Festival: Gringo Trails

Time: 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Location: Guild Cinema (3405 Central Ave NE)
Description: Join the UNM Student Organization for Latin American Studies (SOLAS) for the 2016 Sin Fronteras Film Festival. The film festival was started by SOLAS in 2005 and was the first New Mexico film festival to exclusively feature Latino films and filmmakers. Each year, the festival presents films, documentaries, animations and short films with the purpose of increasing awareness of Hispanic and indigenous cultures of Latin America. This year the festival includes "Gringo Trails," a feature-length documentary that raises urgent questions about one of the most powerful globalizing forces of our time: tourism. Spanning South America, Africa and Asia, the tourist pathway known as the "gringo trail" has facilitated both life-altering adventures and the despoiling of many once virgin environments. The film follows stories along the trail to reveal the complex relationships between colliding cultures: host countries hungry for financial security and the tourists who provide it in their quest for authentic experiences.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII, Guild Cinema, School of Law, El Centro de la Raza, Department of Sociology, and the Department of Geography & Environmental Studies.
Notes: The entire festival is free of charge and open to the public. For more information and film trailers, visit the SOLAS website. For reference, see the film festival poster.
Mar 26

SOLAS Sin Fronteras Film Festival: Que Horas Ela Volta?

Time: 6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
Location: Guild Cinema (3405 Central Ave NE)
Description: Join the UNM Student Organization for Latin American Studies (SOLAS) for the 2016 Sin Fronteras Film Festival. The film festival was started by SOLAS in 2005 and was the first New Mexico film festival to exclusively feature Latino films and filmmakers. Each year, the festival presents films, documentaries, animations and short films with the purpose of increasing awareness of Hispanic and indigenous cultures of Latin America. This year the festival includes "Que Horas Ela Volta?", a film that stars Regina Casé as Val, the housemaid of a wealthy family in São Paulo, and portrays the tensions that arise after her estranged daughter Jéssica moves into the family's house in order to apply for an admission exam at the city's university. With Jéssica's arrival, the unspoken class barriers that exist within the home are thrown into disarray.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII, Guild Cinema, School of Law, El Centro de la Raza, Department of Sociology, and the Department of Geography & Environmental Studies.
Notes: The entire festival is free of charge and open to the public. For more information and film trailers, visit the SOLAS website. For reference, see the film festival poster.
Mar 27

SOLAS Sin Fronteras Film Festival: Dólares de Arena

Time: 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Location: Guild Cinema (3405 Central Ave NE)
Description: Join the UNM Student Organization for Latin American Studies (SOLAS) for the 2016 Sin Fronteras Film Festival. The film festival was started by SOLAS in 2005 and was the first New Mexico film festival to exclusively feature Latino films and filmmakers. Each year, the festival presents films, documentaries, animations and short films with the purpose of increasing awareness of Hispanic and indigenous cultures of Latin America. This year the festival includes "Dólares de Arena," a film that tells the story of how, every afternoon Noelí, a young Dominican girl, goes to the beaches at Las Terrenas. Along with her boyfriend, they look for ways to make a living at the expense of one of the hundreds of tourists that wander the beach. As people parade through her life, Noelí has a steady client, a mature French woman who, as time goes by, has found an ideal refuge on the island to spend her last years. Noelí's boyfriend feigns to be her brother and outlines a plan in which Noelí travels to Paris with the old lady and sends him money every month. For Noelí, the relationship with the old lady is one of convenience, but the feelings become more intense as the departure date closes in.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII, Guild Cinema, School of Law, El Centro de la Raza, Department of Sociology, and the Department of Geography & Environmental Studies.
Notes: The entire festival is free of charge and open to the public. For more information and film trailers, visit the SOLAS website. For reference, see the film festival poster.
Mar 27

SOLAS Sin Fronteras Film Festival: Dólares de Arena

Time: 6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
Location: Guild Cinema (3405 Central Ave NE)
Description: Join the UNM Student Organization for Latin American Studies (SOLAS) for the 2016 Sin Fronteras Film Festival. The film festival was started by SOLAS in 2005 and was the first New Mexico film festival to exclusively feature Latino films and filmmakers. Each year, the festival presents films, documentaries, animations and short films with the purpose of increasing awareness of Hispanic and indigenous cultures of Latin America. This year the festival includes "American DREAMers,” which tells the story behind the Campaign for an American DREAM (CAD), a group of six undocumented youth and an ally who risk their freedom when they publicly come out as undocumented and walk 3,000 miles to the nation's capital to organize for immigrant rights. These are college students, young professionals, activists, and community leaders. Follow their journey as they come out of the shadows, share their stories, empower communities, and put everything on the line to fight in what they believe is their civil rights movement. They are undocumented and unafraid. And some are UndocuQueer, too.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII, Guild Cinema, School of Law, El Centro de la Raza, Department of Sociology, and the Department of Geography & Environmental Studies.
Notes: The entire festival is free of charge and open to the public. For more information and film trailers, visit the SOLAS website. For reference, see the film festival poster.
Mar 29

CNM•UNM LAS Speaker Series: Beau Murphy: Exploring the Inka Empire: Ancient Imperialism in the High Andes, Low Jungles, and Hyper-Arid Atacama Desert

Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Main Campus, Max Salazar (MS) Building, Room 201
Description: Join the CNM and UNM Latin American Studies programs for a jointly sponsored lecture with graduate student Beau Murphy, whose research involves archaeological field studies of the Inka in Peru and Chile. Murphy will discuss the emergence and expansion of the Inka Empire in the 15th century AD, which culminated in control of much of western South America prior to Spanish contact. Highlighted in this discussion is archaeological evidence of imperial activity in two challenging and antithetical environments: the overgrown jungles of the eastern Andean slopes and the hyper-arid Atacama Desert of distant northern Chile.
Sponsors: LAII, CNM Latin American Studies Program
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the Spring 2016 Speaker Series flyer or the event flyer for this particular lecture. For information concerning parking, please see the CNM's Visitor Parking guidelines.
Mar 31

LAII Lecture Series: Carmen Julia Holguin Chaparro – Benedetti, en persona (en español)

Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with Dr. Carmen Julia Holguín Chaparro of the UNM Department of Spanish & Portuguese as she discusses Uruguayan author Mario Benedetti (1920-2009), whose politically-informed and diverse writings appeared during the Latin American Boom generation.
Professor Holguín Chaparro was born in Hidalgo del Parral, Chihuahua, México. She graduated from UNM in 2011 with a PhD in Latin American Literature. Her dissertation's focus is on Mario Benedetti's novel Primavera con una esquina rota, in which she analyzed specific topics of political prisoners under the Uruguayan dictatorship of 1973. From her research, she developed a strong interest in the literature and art representing the phenomenon of Latin America's dictatorships.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This is a free event open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 7

LAII Lecture Series: Santiago Anria – The Rise of Movement-Based Parties in Latin America: Lessons from the Bolivian MAS in Comparative Perspective

Time: 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Location: Dane Smith Hall, Room 329
Description: Join us for a presentation in which Dr. Santiago Anria discusses one of the most puzzling developments in Latin America: the recent emergence and ascendance to power of movement-based parties that represent the interests of the politically and socially marginalized. The Bolivian MAS (Movement Toward Socialism) is one of the most successful of these parties, and one that stands out for its novelty and exception in both Bolivian and Latin American politics. In this presentation, Anria discusses the empirical findings and arguments of his research in Bolivia, where he conducted extensive fieldwork that involved more than 150 interviews with political elites, as well as with leaders of social movements allied with the MAS. The story that emerges from the analysis is that the MAS does not operate under a purely bottom-up logic, but rather as a hybrid model that combines top-down leadership and significant opportunities for bottom-up influence and impact. Anria discusses how this has affected Bolivian politics, as well as its possible legacies in comparative perspective.
Anria is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Tulane University’s Center for Inter-American Policy and Research (CIPR). He has published articles and chapters on social movements, political parties, and democracy in Latin America. His current research examines the organizational attributes of movement-based parties and their interaction with different environments.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of Political Science, Tulane University Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies
Notes: This is a free event open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.For other events focused on similar themes, see the speaker series flyer for Emerging Politics of Latin America.
Apr 7

Border Doors and the Unmasking of the Zones of Meaning

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library Learning Commons
Description: A new exhibit, Border Doors and the Unmasking of the Zones of Meaning, will be in place at locations on campus and at the National Hispanic Cultural Center through April 20th. An opening reception with presentations by the student artists will be held on April 7th from 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. in the Zimmerman Library Learning Commons.
The exhibit is comprised of 18 doors created by high school students enrolled in the Sandia Preparatory School class The Neglect of Women Workers and the New Era of Hope. The advanced Spanish-language course is taught by Claudio Pérez, a faculty member with the school's Modern Language Department. In the course Pérez encourages students to think deeply about issues related to immigration, from immigrants' lived experiences to the complex historical relationship between the United States, Mexico, and Central America. Students studied this topic in their classrooms in Albuquerque and through a field trip to the U.S-Mexico border when they visited the Border Immersion Program at Iglesia Luterana Cristo Rey in El Paso, Texas. Throughout the semester, Pérez relied on Nazario's Enrique's Journey to present a compelling and informative account of immigrants' experiences traveling through Central America to the United States. At the end of the term, Pérez invited the students to express their thoughts, responses, and realizations by using the doors as canvases for mixed-media collages.
Sponsors: Border Doors and the Unmasking of the Zones of Meaning exhibit is a collaboration between Sandia Preparatory School, the National Hispanic Cultural Center, and multiple UNM entities, including Chicana and Chicano Studies, Department of Anthropology, Department of History, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, El Centro de la Raza, Latin American & Iberian Institute, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology Hibben Center, Office of Student Academic Success, Southwest Hispanic Research Institute, and University Libraries.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see the exhibit flyer and map.
Apr 8

Symposium: "Genius You Can't Refuse: Recovering the Story and Music of Manuel Areu (1845-1942)

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Join the UNM Honors College for a symposium honoring the work of Manuel Areau (1854-1942). From a dumpster in Jerome, Arizona, to UNM Zimmerman Library’s collections, the music scores and documents of Manuel Areu tell us about his creative work in Spain, Cuba, Mexico, and the United States in times of important social and political change. This rare treasure is now part of our heritage. UNM Honors College students and faculty present in this symposium on recovering this historical and musical legacy.
Sponsors: UNM Honors College with support from the New Mexico Philharmonic Orchestra, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Fundación Educativa de México en Nuevo México, UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute, UNM Center for Southwest Research, and Lee Blaugrund.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. It is one among several events in Spring 2016 which pay tribute to Manuel Areu. For more information, see the series poster.
Apr 8

LAII Lecture Series (Workshop): Santiago Anria – Field Work Strategies in the Social Sciences

Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Social Sciences Building (SSCO), Room 2069
Description: Join us for a workshop with Dr. Santiago Anria as he shares insights and observations based on extensive field research in Bolivia. Graduate students and faculty from all disciplines are encouraged to attend.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of Political Science, Tulane University Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies
Notes: This is a free event open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.For other events focused on similar themes, see the speaker series flyer for Emerging Politics of Latin America.
Apr 13

Community Event: Presentation and Discussion with Sonia Nazario

Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:20 p.m.
Location: South Valley Academy gym, 3426 Blake Rd. SW, Albuquerque
Description: On Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at 3:00 p.m., journalist and author of Enrique's Journey, Sonia Nazario, will be participating in a community presentation and discussion at the South Valley Academy. The discussion will use her work, Enrique's Journey, as a frame for discussion of immigrant rights, migration of Central American unaccompanied minors, asylum, and other local and regional concerns.
Enrique's Journey recounts the quest of a young Honduran boy traveling through Central America and Mexico to reach his mother in the United States, who was forced to leave her family in Honduras to find work. During the extensive trip, Enrique braves unimaginable peril, often riding on the sides and tops of freight trains and traversing some of the most dangerous countryside in Mexico. Along the way, Enrique encounters trauma and violence, but also kindness and assistance he could never imagine, all in order to reunite with his mother after eleven years apart.
Sponsors: Dean of Students, Department of English, Department of History, Department of Sociology, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Division Equity & Inclusion, Division of Student Affairs, El Centro de la Raza, ENLACE NM, Graduate Resource Center, Hispanic Heritage Committee, Honors College, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Office of the Provost, UNM Bookstore, UNM CAMP, University College, University Libraries
Notes: This is a free event open to the public. For more information, please see the event flyer
Apr 13

Round Table Discussion with Anthony Pereira and Vinicius de Carvalho: #What's Up With Brazil - Political Crisis at the Crossroads of Democracy

Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Location: Ortega Hall, Room 335
Description: Please join us for a talk and round table discussion with two leading scholars from King's College Brazil Institute, Dr. Anthony Pereira and Dr. Vinicius de Carvalho, as they discuss the current state of affairs in Brazil, including the Lava Jato scandal, impeachment proceedings, and the political tensions that currently engulf the nation.
Sponsors: Department of Spanish & Portuguese, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Apr 17

New Mexico Philharmonic Concert: "Zarzuelas: Rediscovered Romance"

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center
Description: Unheard for more than a century, rediscovered Spanish operettas, or zarzuelas, by late 19th and early 20th century composer Manuel Areu will be performed by the New Mexico Philharmonic and conducted by Areu expert and Argentina native Dr. Javier Lorenzo. These rare masterworks will astound you with their beauty and spirit!
Sponsors: UNM Honors College with support from the New Mexico Philharmonic Orchestra, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Fundación Educativa de México en Nuevo México, UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute, UNM Center for Southwest Research, and Lee Blaugrund.
Notes: This is a ticketed event. For more information, visit the NM Philharmonic website. It is one among several events in Spring 2016 which pay tribute to Manuel Areu. For more information, see the series poster.
Apr 17

Photographic Exhibition and Opening Reception: Recovered Genius: Manuel Areu's Life and Music (1845-1942)

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Center, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join the UNM Honors College and partners for the opening reception of a photograph exhibit on Manuel Areu's life and music.
Sponsors: UNM Honors College with support from the New Mexico Philharmonic Orchestra, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Fundación Educativa de México en Nuevo México, UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute, UNM Center for Southwest Research, and Lee Blaugrund.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. It is one among several events in Spring 2016 which pay tribute to Manuel Areu. For more information, see the series poster.
April 18

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Casa Rondeña Winery (733 Chavez Rd NW, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque)
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In April we're reading Claire of the Sea Light by Edwidge Danticat.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2015-2016 Selected Titles.
Apr 19

Book Release and Discussion with Margaret Randall: Haydée Santamaría, Cuban Revolutionary

Time: 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Willard Rom
Description: Join us as noted author and activist Margaret Randall discusses her most recent publication, Haydée Santamaría, Cuban Revolutionary: She Led by Transgression (Duke University Press, 2015).Taking part in the Cuban Revolution's first armed action in 1953, enduring the torture and killings of her brother and fiancé, assuming a leadership role in the underground movement, and smuggling weapons into Cuba, Haydée Santamaría was the only woman to participate in every phase of the Revolution. Virtually unknown outside of Cuba, Santamaría was a trusted member of Fidel Castro's inner circle and friend of Che Guevara. Following the Revolution's victory Santamaría founded and ran the cultural and arts institution Casa de las Americas, which attracted cutting-edge artists, exposed Cubans to some of the world's greatest creative minds, and protected queer, black, and feminist artists from state repression. Santamaría's suicide in 1980 caused confusion and discomfort throughout Cuba; despite her commitment to the Revolution, communist orthodoxy's disapproval of suicide prevented the Cuban leadership from mourning and celebrating her in the Plaza of the Revolution. In this impressionistic portrait of her friend Haydée Santamaría, Margaret Randall shows how one woman can help change the course of history.
Sponsors: University Libraries, Latin American and Iberian Institute, Department of History, and Feminist Research Institute
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.
Apr 20

Symposium: Cervantes and his Legacy

Time: 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Willard Rom
Description: Join the UNM Department of Spanish & Portuguese and co-sponsors for "Cervantes and His Legacy," a collection of presentations, panels, and readings celebrating the 500th anniversary of the death of Miguel de Cervantes, celebrated author of "Don Quijote." The event will begin at 9:30 a.m. coffee and opening remarks and culminate at 4:30 p.m. with a reception at the UNM University Faculty Club.
Sponsors: Department of Spanish & Portuguese with support from the Consulate of Mexico in Albuquerque, Instituto Cervantes, Department American Studies, Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies, Department of English, Department of Foreign Languages & Literature, Department of History, Division of Student Affairs, Latin American & Iberian Institute, Office of the Provost, Spanish & Portuguese Graduate Student Association, and Zimmerman Library.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. for reference, see the event flyer.
April 21

Conference: Conducting Fieldwork Under Complicated Circumstances

Time: Varies
Location: Varies
Description: Join us for "Conducting Fieldwork Under Complicated Circumstances," an interdisciplinary event whose goal is to bring together faculty and graduate students from across UNM who are interested in improving approaches to fieldwork, particularly in situations where research is made more more difficult due to complicated circumstances. We are defining "complicated circumstances" as anything that increases the level of risk for either the subjects or the researcher. This could mean research involving vulnerable populations, fieldwork in areas where there is violence or state fragility, or any set of circumstances that heightens the ethical and moral considerations of the research project. The conference will include several keynote speakers, a roundtable discussion of experiences and best practices across disciplines, several panels of graduate student proposals, where each fieldwork proposal is workshopped collectively, as well as a film and discussion. There will also be numerous opportunities for participants to mingle with students and faculty from a range of disciplines, which will hopefully provide a platform for interdisciplinary cooperation, and future research.
Sponsors: Organized by Anna Calasanti and Fiorella Vera-Adrianzen (graduate students in the Department of Political Science) with support from The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Latin American & Iberian Institute, College of Arts and Sciences, School of Law, University College, Department of Linguistics, Department of Political Science, and the School of Public Administration.
Notes: For more information, visit the conference website.
Apr 26

CNM•UNM LAS Speaker Series: Erin Debenport: Pueblo Invisibilities in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Main Campus, Max Salazar (MS) Building, Room 201
Description: Join the CNM and UNM Latin American Studies programs for a jointly sponsored lecture with Dr. Erin Debenport, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and faculty affiliate of the Latin American & Iberian Institute at UNM. In this presentation, Debenport discusses the consequences of being indigenous in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Using ethnographic and linguistic examples from Ysleta del Sur Pueblo, Texas, a federally recognized tribe whose reservation is located within the city of El Paso and also abuts the international border fence, she shows how the dominance of the border often erases the visibility of Native residents of the region, and the resulting political and economic consequences of this erasure. Focusing on the tribe's language revitalization program as a case study, this presentation considers how promoting the use of Native language on and off the reservation serves as a resource for asserting sovereignty and difference.
Sponsors: LAII, CNM Latin American Studies Program
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the Spring 2016 Speaker Series flyer. For information concerning parking, please see the CNM's Visitor Parking guidelines. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Apr 27

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar: Lucila del Carmen León Velazco - Soldiers of Baja California, 1697-1840: Social Interaction Processes in Northwestern New Spain

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Join the LAII and University Libraries for a presentation with Dr. Lucila del Carmen León Velazco, a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar. Dr. Velazco will discuss how, during the eighteenth and early nineteenth century, the soldiers that settled with their families in the peninsula of Baja California, in addition to effecting their military service, performed other activities that allowed them to become exceedingly familiar with the geographical characteristics of the region. This knowledge of the physical environment allowed for multiple processes underlying social interaction between soldiers and various groups of the emerging society. The experience facilitated many soldiers acting as intermediaries in relationships with indigenous populations and as cultural mediators to facilitate the adaptation of other regional groups, such as the local authorities and missionaries, to the environment. Dr. Velazco is a professor in the Instituto de Investigaciones Históricas in the Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, where she teaches courses on Regional History, Colonial New Spain and Paleography. Her research focuses on colonial and nineteenth-century Mexican history, with an emphasis on Baja California, and addresses the interrelations between missionaries, soldiers and indigenous peoples during the colonial period and changes that occurred after Independence. Her current project examines the role of Spanish soldiers in the development of Baja California during the mission period and the first part of the nineteenth-century.
Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Apr 27

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Art as Social Protest in the Americas

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Join us for this free professional development workshop in which we'll consider art as a tool for social protest and social change in the Americas. We will draw upon Latin American and Latinx artists and their work for understanding and inspiration. The evening will begin with a presentation by Dr. Holly Barnet-Sanchez, Professor Emerita of Art and Art History at UNM, as she discusses art's role in social change and expression across the Americas in the 20th century. After allowing time for dialogue and questions, we'll continue into the latter portion of the evening, which will be led by local artist and educator Valerie Rangel. Rangel will discuss how her own art has served as a tool for social engagement and will lead participants in hands-on activities to develop cut paper art. LAII staff will also share suggestions for how to share these ideas with your students and incorporate the activity into your classroom.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: Certificates of professional development and refreshments will be provided. The event is free and open to all educators, but registration is required. Please RSVP at the event registration website.
Apr 28

LAII Lecture Series: Candelaria Garay: Social Policy Expansion in Latin America

Time: 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Location: LAII
Description: Join us for a presentation in which Dr. Candelaria Garay presents her book Social Policy Expansion in Latin America, forthcoming in 2016 (Cambridge University Press). The book provides a novel argument to account for the expansion of social policy to millions of labor-market outsiders-rural, informal, and unemployed workers and dependents -and to explain the adoption of different policy models in several Latin American countries beginning in the 1990s. Based on a comparative study of different social policy areas and countries over time, it places dynamics likely to emerge in democratic regimes at the center of analysis, showing that the presence of electoral competition for the vote of outsiders and social mobilization for policy change constitute critical factors for expansion. Cross-national variation in social policy is explained by the balance of partisan power and the presence of social movements in policy making, with social movement involvement likely resulting in the adoption of benefits with broader scope of coverage and social participation in implementation. The study draws on in-depth cases studies of policymaking in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico, and further assesses the argument with an analysis of four additional middle-income countries in Latin America and beyond.
Garay is an Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government. Her research focuses on social policy, collective action, and party politics in Latin America. She received a Ph.D. and M.A. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley, and holds a B.A. in Sociology from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of Political Science, Tulane University Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For other events focused on similar themes, see the speaker series flyer for Emerging Politics of Latin America. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Apr 28

Interdisciplinary Lecture Series in Linguistics: Katherine O'Donnell Christoffersen - 'You live in the United States, you speak English,' decían las maestras: How New Mexican Spanish speakers enact, ascribe and reject ethnic identities

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Dane Smith Hall, 123
Description: New Mexico's unique linguistic and ethnic heritage is the result of a complex history of colonization characterized by oppression. While research has reviewed the historical context and linguistic features (Bills & Vigil, 1999) and labels for the regional dialect (Dolores González, 2005), researchers have yet to examine how New Mexican Spanish speakers negotiate ethnic identities through bilingual talk-in-interaction. The present study takes an ethnomethodological approach to identity as something which people 'do' (Widdicombe, 1998) and analyzes how New Mexican Spanish speakers 'do' ethnic identities. The present analysis is based on a subset of the New Mexico and Colorado Spanish Survey (Bills & Vigil, 1999), including 30 fully transcribed audio-recordings of semi-structured interviews with New Mexican Spanish speakers. A conversation analysis (CA) approach reveals how New Mexican Spanish speakers enact, ascribe and reject ethnic identities, including the significant recurring themes of voices of the oppressors of New Mexican Spanish, changing linguistic realities for younger generations of speakers, and crossing, or the concept of crossing, especially in references to passing for native speakers of English. In sum, the study reveals that New Mexican Spanish speakers construct and re-construct social structure, and in particular enact multiple shifting ethnic identities, through bilingual talk-in-interaction.
Christoffersen holds a PhD in Second Language Acquisition & Teaching from the University of Arizona and is currently a Visiting Research Scholar in Hispanic Linguistics at the University of New Mexico. Her primary research interests include the analysis of Spanish-English and Portuguese-Spanish language contact through the use of ethnographic and discourse/conversation analytic methodologies. Katie has worked on the discourse analysis of identity construction in bilingual (Spanish-English) schools, ESL students, family conversation at the Brazil-Uruguay border and ethnic identities among New Mexican Spanish speakers.
Sponsors: Department of Linguistics & the High Desert Linguistics Society, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.For more information, please see the event flyer.
Apr 29

History Colloquium: Nara Milanich - The Alchemy of Kinship: Testing Paternity in the 1920's

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: Mesa Vista Hall, 1104 (History Commons)
Description: Join the UNM History Department, Women's Studies, the Feminist Research Institute, and the Latin American & Iberian Institute for a presentation by Dr. Nara Milanich. Dr. Milanich will be presenting and discussing a chapter of a book manuscript titled The Birth of Uncertainty: Testing Paternity in the Twentieth Century. The presentation will discuss how new advances in the 1920s appeared to overthrow the previous principle of pater semper incertus est ("the father is always uncertain"). The presentation will explore the development of tests of biological parentage over the course of the twentieth century and their consequences for men, women, and children, states and societies.
Milanich, Associate Professor of History, joined the faculty of Barnard in 2004. Her scholarly interests include modern Latin America, Chile, and the comparative histories of family, gender, childhood, reproduction, law, and social inequality.
Sponsors: Department of History, Women's Studies, Feminist Research Institute, and the Latin American & Iberian Institute
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Apr 30

REZILIENCE 2016 - Indigenous Arts Experience

Time: Gates Open: 9:00 a.m. | Main Concert: 5:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Plaza Mayor
Description: REZILIENCE-Indigenous Arts Experience is an immersive, all-ages experience that focuses on modern Indigenous art processes. Artists include both nationally and locally recognized entertainers, muralists, multimedia artists, and poets. More than sixty Indigenous artists and art-related professionals representing the U.S., Canada, and Latin America will participate during the full-day event, sharing their talents, skills, and knowledge in eight creative arenas. Event sections titled "Movement," "Design," "Inspiration," "Voice," "Vision," "Expression," and "Exchange" will feature a variety of disciplines and creative activities. Founded on values of collaboration, social entrepreneurship, and resource sharing, REZILIENCE will encourage conversations about Indigenous art processes worldwide.
Notes: For more information please visit the NHCC Website (link to: http://www.nhccnm.org/event/rezilience-2016-indigenous-arts-experience/) or the REZILIENCE website (link to: http://www.rezartx.com/). Campus entrance $5; main concert $40. Tickets to the main concert include campus entry
May 10

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Teaching Cultural Heritage through Art

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Please join us for our last professional development workshop of the year as we enjoy the unique opportunity to hear from children’s book illustrator Luis Garay. Garay will discuss teaching cultural heritage through art. Certificates of professional development and light refreshments will be provided. Luis Garay was born in 1965 in Granada, Nicaragua. Costa Rica was Luis's home from 1983 until 1988, when he emigrated to Toronto, Canada, to work on his career as an artist. Painting has always been his true passion. Nowadays, as a citizen of both countries, he spends his time between Nicaragua and Canada, doing research for his book projects and working full-time as a children's book illustrator, making use of his favorite painting techniques: aquarela and acrylic. He has been called one of the best young Latin American illustrators working today.
Sponsors: LAII, Santa Fe Art Institute
Notes: Certificates of professional development and refreshments will be provided. The event is free and open to all educators, but registration is required. Please RSVP at the event registration website and see the event flyer for reference.
May 13

LAS Convocation

Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Hibben Center Atrium
Description: The Latin American Studies (LAS) program will hold its Spring 2016 Convocation, honoring those undergraduate and graduate students who will receive LAS degrees in May and August. This year's keynote speaker will be Dr. Tey Marianna Nunn, UNM LAS alumnus and Director of the Museum and Visual Arts Program at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This is a free event open to the public.
May 18

LAII Lecture Series: Luisa Campos: Yo Si Puedo: From the Cuban Literacy Campaign to a Global Movement

Time: 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, Main Atrium
Description: Join us for a presentation with Cuban scholar and educator Luisa Campos as she discusses the Cuban Literacy Campaign of 1961 and its ongoing, international influence through the Yo Si Puedo program.
In 1961, Cuba eradicated literacy around the country. 250,000 volunteer teachers joined the national literacy campaign. Almost half of them were under 18 and over half of them were women. Together they taught a nation to read and write - and their lives would never be the same. The success of their efforts in Cuba has had worldwide repercussions. Reproduced through the Yo Si Puedo program, the Cuban Literacy Campaign launched a worldwide movement to enhance literacy, reaching over six million people in twenty-nine countries.
Campos holds a master’s in education and has taught for over forty years at the José Enrique Varona Pedagogical University in Havana, Cuba, where she also serves as the director of the Cuban Literacy Campaign Museum and teaches courses at the undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate level in topics such as Cuban history, ethics, José Martí, adult education, literacy, and the Yo Si Puedo program. She has served as an advisor for the Yo Si Puedo methodological programs in Cuba and abroad.
Sponsors: LAII, Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, and The Literacy Project.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. We will hold a reception after the presentation to welcome Dr. Campos to Albuquerque. For reference, see the event flyer.
Jun 6

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Casa Rondeña Winery
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. Our May book group has been rescheduled until June due to group availability. In addition, because of difficulties finding sufficient copies of Dark Dude by Oscar Hijuelos, we have postponed that discussion and will instead read The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2015-2016 Selected Titles.
July 7

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar: Jacqueline Avila: Cinesonidos: Film Music and Identity in Mexican Cinema (1896-1952)

Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: LAII Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII and Universities Libraries for a presentation with Dr. Jacqueline Avila, a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar, who will discuss her current research on Mexican film music during the first half of the twentieth century. This is an interdisciplinary project that examines the function of music in the prominent film genres developed during Mexico’s silent (1896–1930) and early sound period (1931–1952). Looking at several examples of popular, regional, and orchestral music in select films, Dr. Avila examines how music contributed to creating and accentuating cinematic tropes and archetypes considered central to Mexican cultural nationalism.
Dr. Avila is an Assistant Professor in Musicology at the University of Tennessee. Her research focuses on film music and sound practice from the silent period to present and the intersections of identity, tradition, and modernity in the Hollywood and Mexican film industries. Dr. Avila was the recipient of the UC MEXUS Dissertation Research Grant, the American Musicological Society’s Howard Mayer Brown Fellowship, and the UC MEXUS Postdoctoral Fellowship (2014-2015). Her publications can be found in the Journal of Film Music, Iconic Mexico, and Latin American Music Review. She is currently writing her book manuscript, which is an examination of the function and cultural representation of music in the Mexican film industry.
Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Sept. 1

Film Screening & K-12 Educator's Workshop: Colonization and Resistance in Latin America

Time: 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Wells Fargo Theater, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join us for a free, public screening of the feature film Even the Rain / También la lluvia. The film depicts how "a Spanish film crew helmed by idealistic director Sebastian (Gael García Bernal) and his cynical producer (Luis Tosar) come to Bolivia to make a revisionist epic about the conquest of Latin America - on the cheap. Carlos Aduviri is dynamic as 'Daniel,' a local cast as a 16th century native in the film within a film. When the filming is interrupted, Daniel moves into action protesting his community's deprivation of water at the hands of multi-national corporations."
The screening will be followed by a discussion period dedicated to discussing how to introduce topics of colonization and resistance in middle and high school classrooms.
Sponsors: LAII, Cine Magnífico Albuquerque's Latino Film Festival, Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer. No refreshments will be provided, but individuals can purchase food and drink from Pop Fizz, which is located on the NHCC campus.
Sept. 6

Journalist Alex Cuadros - The Olympics, Boom and Bust in Brazil

Time: 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Willard Room
Description: In the run-up to the 2016 Olympics, much of the U.S. media coverage played up fears over the Zika virus, terror attacks, and the general safety of athletes and tourists in Rio de Janeiro. But it gave short shrift to the most urgent problems underlying the games, such as wasteful spending, demolitions of poor neighborhoods, and the ongoing violence in the areas of Rio where most outsiders rarely travel. For a deeper understanding of Rio's Olympic legacy, and of the larger context of Brazil's most recent cycle of boom and bust, join us for a talk with the journalist and author Alex Cuadros, who spent six years based in Brazil.
Cuadros is the author of Brazillionaires: Wealth, Power, Decadence, and Hope in an American Country (Spiegel & Grau, 2016), which is based on his experience covering the ultra-rich as a full-time job for Bloomberg News in Sõo Paulo. He has also written for The Atlantic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Time, The Washington Post, and others. Now based in New York, he grew up in Albuquerque.
Sponsors: Bookstore, Global Education Office (GEO), Center for English Language and American Culture (CELAC), University Libraries & Learning Sciences, and LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Books will be available for purchase and signing following the lecture. For reference, see the event flyer or join the event on Facebook.
Sept. 8

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Rethinking Columbus

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: With Columbus Day on October 10th, this time of year provides the opportunity both to reconsider not only how and what we teach about Christopher Columbus, but also more generally how conquest, colonization and the continued struggles of indigenous peoples are taught in the classroom. The workshop will focus on curriculum that encourages teachers and students to think more deeply about Columbus’ encounter with the Americas from multiple points of view. The book Rethinking Columbus: The Next 500 Years (Rethinking Schools, Ltd, 1998) is the foundational resource for this discussion. This is a great opportunity for all teachers or teacher education students.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: For reference, see the event flyer.Copies of Rethinking Columbus: The Next 500 Years will be provided for the first 20 registered participants! Registration is required. Please RSVP by visiting our event registration website. Participants may request certificates of professional development. Dinner will be provided.
Sept. 9

Historian Elaine Carey - Doing Drugs in the Archive: Facts, Fictions, and Histories of Women Traffickers

Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Willard Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with Dr. Elaine Carey, Professor and Chairperson of the Department History at St. John's University in Queens, New York. She will draw from her recent book, Women Drug Traffickers(University of New Mexico Press, 2014). Beginning with the passage of the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act of 1914, men and women trafficked drugs in, through, and into the United States. For over a century, these nimble organizations easily responded to technological, criminological, cultural, and market shifts with greater sophistication. In this presentation, Carey will discuss the historical methods of researching women drug traffickers whose entire business practices and successes depended on anonymity.
Sponsors: New Mexico Historical Review, Department of History, LAII, University Libraries & Learning Sciences
Notes: For reference, see the event flyer. This event is free and open to the public.
Sept. 12

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Tractor Brewing, 1800 4th St. NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from around Albuquerque come together to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In September, we'll read "Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal," a novel-in-verse by Margarita Engle which looks at the history of the Panama Canal.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit our related blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For reference, see our printable list of 2016 Fall titles and dates.
Sept 15-18

Film Festival: ¡Cine Magnífico!

Time: Varies
Location: Varies
Description: The LAII is pleased to support the fourth annual ¡Cine Magnífico! Albuquerque Latino Film Festival, whose vision is to present the newest films by and about Latinos to promote our culture through film and enrich our local art community. Through an educational partnership, the LAII proudly co-sponsors the free screening of The Landfill Harmonic, a film that will be of interest to educators and the general public alike. This film follows the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura, a Paraguayan musical youth group of kids that live next to one of South America's largest landfills. This unlikely orchestra plays music from instruments made entirely out of garbage. When their story goes viral, the orchestra is catapulted into the global spotlight. With the guidance of their music director, they must navigate this new world of arenas and sold out concerts. However, when a natural disaster devastates their community, the orchestra provides a source of hope for the town. The film is a testament to the transformative power of music and the resilience of the human spirit.
The festival as a whole showcases a diverse set of films, from award-winning to local and up-and-coming filmmakers. The festival's team has selected a lineup of films which perfectly illustrates enriching points of view about emerging issues and topics that shape the current Hispanic-Latino cultures and landscapes. This years' screenings will take place at the National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM, and the Guild Cinema.
Sponsors: Organized by Instituto Cervantes and Bernalillo County in partnership with the National Hispanic Cultural Center, LAII, and Guild Cinema, and supported by a host of community partners.
Notes: For complete details, visit the ¡Cine Magnífico! website.
Sept. 21

LAII Fall Reception

Time: 5:00-7:00 p.m.
Location: Bow & Arrow Brewing Company, 608 McKnight Ave. NW
Description: The Latin American & Iberian Institute hosts its annual fall reception to celebrate our community of faculty, students, staff, alumni, and community partners. Anyone and everyone with an interest in Latin America and Iberia are encouraged to attend. Join us for mingling and refreshments!
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public, but an RSVP is requested. Please RSVP by September 1st.
Sept. 22

Greenleaf Scholar: Lorraine J. Affourtit: Resistance is Fertile: Graphic Art, Collective Identity, and Public Space in the Oaxaca Commune

Time: 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Herzstein Reading Room
Description: Join the LAII and University Libraries for a presentation with Lorraine J. Affourtit, a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar. Affourtit’s presentation will look at the how elements of the layered visual environment manifested in the protests of the summer of 2006 in Oaxaca, Mexico – known as The Oaxaca Commune.
Affourtit is a fifth year Ph.D. student in the Visual Studies doctoral program at University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research and writing is focused on contemporary visual culture of the Americas, critical theory, and visual semiotics. She is currently working on her dissertation project, The Art of Assembly: Visualizing Collectivity in Oaxaca’s Popular Uprising, which considers how visual culture has been instrumental in a popular uprising and social movement taking place in Oaxaca, Mexico during the last decade.
Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries & Learning Sciences
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Sept. 22

Musicology Colloquium Series: León García Corona - Mexico's Broken Heart: Music, Politics, and Sentimentalism in Bolero

Time: 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Location: Keller Hall
Description: Performances of sentimentalism are ever-present in Mexican society, whether in the streets or in informal gatherings, where people sing songs that provide an outlet for deep-seated feelings of vulnerability. In this presentation, Dr. León F. García Corona explores how the bolero encapsulates not only sentimentalism in Mexico but also the country’s economic and political turmoil.García Corona is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Northern Arizona University. He worked as a content producer and education specialist for the Smithsonian Institution, where he was the founder and managing editor of Folkways Magazine. His research focuses on the connections between politics, economics, and music sentimentalism. His current book project explores music and sentimentalism in Mexico in its socio-economic, political, and historical context. He has also directed ensembles and world music workshops as a guest lecturer at the University of Washington, University of Michigan, Pennsylvania State University, and the University of Idaho.
Sponsors: UNM Department of Music, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.For reference, see the event flyer
Sept. 27

CNM-UNM Latin American Studies Speaker Series: Frances Hayashida: Introduction to the Inka Empire

Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: CNM Main Campus, Max Salazar Building, Room 202
Description: Join the CNM and UNM Latin American Studies programs for our Fall 2016 Speaker Series. Dr. Frances Hayashida will draw on her archaeological research in the Atacama Desert as she discusses the Inka Empire. Hayshida is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and a faculty affiliate with the Latin American and Iberian Institute at UNM. Before coming to New Mexico, she held research fellowships at Dumbarton Oaks and the Technische Universität München and taught at the University of Virginia, Penn State, and the University of Missouri. Her research focuses on the political economy and political ecology of Andean states and empires, and her areas of interest include agriculture and water management, craft production, and beer brewing. She currently co-directs a project on agriculture and empire in the high-altitude Atacama Desert with colleagues from the Universidad de Chile and the Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain).
Sponsors: CNM Latin American Studies Program, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the series flyer.
Sept. 29

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Día de los Muertos and Cultural Literacy in Practice

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, Ballroom
Description: Join the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute and the National Hispanic Cultural Center for a free professional development workshop for K-12 educators focused on Día de los Muertos. Using culturally relevant resources, participants will learn how to integrate Día de los Muertos into their classrooms through art and literacy based activities that explore the history and practices associated with this tradition.
Sponsors: National Hispanic Cultural Center, LAII
Notes: Certificates of professional development will be provided to participants. Dinner will be served. Registration is required for this free event. We ask that you PLEASE ONLY REGISTER if you are confident you will attend the workshop. Visit our registration website to confirm your space.Please see the event flyer for reference
Oct. 10

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Tractor Brewing, 1800 4th St. NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from around Albuquerque come together to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In October, we're reading the 2016 Américas Award-winning title, Out of Darkness, by Ashley Hope-Pérez, a YA historical fiction novel that offers a gripping and mesmerizing account of small town racial tension and love in 1930s Texas.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit our related blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For reference, see our printable list of 2016 Fall titles and dates.
Oct. 13

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Día de los Muertos - Papel Picado, Shrines, and Sugar Skulls

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, Ballroom
Description: Join the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute and the National Hispanic Cultural Center for a free professional development workshop for K-12 educators focused on Día de los Muertos. Led by artist and educator Arturo Olivas, participants will learn the history behind papel picado, shrines, and sugar skulls, before delving into hands-on instruction in all three elements.
Sponsors: National Hispanic Cultural Center, LAII
Notes: Certificates of professional development will be provided to participants. Dinner will be served. Registration is required for this free event. We ask that you PLEASE ONLY REGISTER if you are confident you will attend the workshop. Visit our registration website to confirm your space.Please see the event flyer for reference
Oct. 19

CNM•UNM Latin American Studies Speaker Series: Jami Núñez: Cozy or Crowded? The Effect of NGOs on Citizens' Contact with Government

Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: CNM Main Campus, Max Salazar Building, Room 202
Description: Join the CNM and UNM Latin American Studies programs for our Fall 2016 Speaker Series. In this presentation, Núñez addresses the debate on whether non-governmental organizations (NGOs) engaging in poverty-alleviating services facilitate or compete with government engagement in similar services. She explores whether interactions with NGOs influence community demands made of government for goods and services. Núñez frames her discussion based upon information she has gathered in the Peruvian Amazon in poor rural communities. Through household surveys, interviews with community leaders, governments and NGOs, Núñez identifies mechanisms through which NGOs actually facilitate contact with government. The conclusions are generally supportive to NGOs but also suggest opportunities to further strengthen local government responsiveness.
Sponsors: CNM Latin American Studies Program, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the series flyer or this event's flyer.
Oct. 27

Young Women United: Film: No Más Bebés

Time: 5:00 - 7:30 p.m.
Location: UNM Domenici Center for Health Sciences Education
Description: Please join Young Women United and the LAII for a free screening of No Más Bebés with filmmaker Virginia Espino. No Más Bebés tells the story of immigrant mothers who sued county doctors, the state, and the U.S. government after they were pushed into sterilizations while giving birth at the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center during the 1960s and 70s. Following the film will be a dialogue with filmmaker Virgina Espino as well as a discussion on the history of forced sterilization and reproductive coercion in New Mexico.
Sponsors: Young Women United, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.
Oct 28

Field Research Grant Colloquium and Reception

Time: 12:00-2:00 p.m.
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII for our second annual Field Research Grant (FRG) colloquium and reception. FRG recipients will share their respective research experiences and findings in a series of presentations. Afterwards, all FRG recipients and members of the LAII community are invited to come and mingle to learn more about the exciting research initiatives of UNM's Latin Americanist graduate students. All are invited and encouraged to attend this event.
Presentations of the second annual FRG colloquium include: Naomi Ambriz: Afro-Cubans in Precarious Times; Holly Brause: Mexican Agrarian Transformations: Lessons from the Chile Fields of Chihuahua; Teresa Drenten: The Process of Space: How Children in Paru Paru, Peru Conceptualize Their World Through Action; Yuliana Kenfield: A Community-Based Participatory Study in Cusco: Students' Views from the Andean Mountains; and Shelby Magee: Can You See Me Now? Visibility Analyses of Ritual Spaces in Northern Chile. For more information about the presenters and their topics, please see our news article on how the "Annual FRG Colloquium Highlights Student Scholarship."
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov. 3

Presentation with Eduard Verhulst - Peace Corps: Live and Work Abroad

Time: 12:00 p.m. -1:00 p.m.
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with Eduard Verhulst, a Peace Corps recruiter, as he discusses the process and motivation for becoming a Peace Corps volunteer. Verhulst served as an agriculture volunteer in Zambia from 2011 to 2013. He focused on agriculture, aquaculture, public health, and business development. After returning from the Peace Corps, he has worked as a Wilderness Ranger in Olympic National Park, and has worked as in New Mexico as a Peace Corps recruiter since 2015.
The Peace Corps sends the best and brightest Americans abroad on behalf of the United States to tackle the most pressing needs of people around the world. Volunteers work at the grassroots level to develop sustainable solutions that address challenges in education, health, economic development, agriculture, environment and youth development. Through their service, volunteers gain a unique cultural understanding and a life-long commitment to service that positions them to succeed in today's global economy. Since President John F. Kennedy established the Peace Corps in 1961, over 220,000 Americans of all ages have served in 140 countries worldwide.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov. 7

Discussion with Authors Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy - A Mirror for America: A Latino Perspective

Time: 5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, Grand Hall
Description: Join us for an evening with acclaimed authors and educators Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy as they offer a presentation about the rich cultural heritage of Latinos and their contributions to honoring the past and creating the future.Alma Flor Ada is a Professor Emerita at the University of San Francisco; an international award-winning author of over 200 books for young readers; and a leading mentor and philosopher of bilingual education in the United States. Her work has centered in topics of critical pedagogy, bilingual and multicultural education, literacy and biliteracy, and authorship. F. Isabel Campoy is an author of numerous children's books in the areas of poetry, theater, stories, biographies, and art, and as a researcher she has published extensively, bringing to the curriculum an awareness of the richness of the Hispanic culture. As an educator she specializes in the areas of literacy and home school interaction, topics on which she lectures nationally.
Sponsors: LAII, Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Nov. 9

Free Film Screening and Discussion with Producer/Director Tatyana Kleyn: Una Vida, Dos Países: Youth and Children (Back) in Mexico

Time: 5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Bank of America Theater, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join us for a free screening of the documentary Una Vida, Dos Países, to be followed by a presentation and discussion with director Dr. Tatyana Kleyn.
In the last five years one million Mexicans residing in the US have returned to Mexico, including children and youth who were born or raised in the US. Una Vida, Dos Países presents the stories of these transborder youth, highlighting their experiences living between two countries, cultures, languages and education systems, and exploring their parents’ decisions to return to their home country after living undocumented in the US. The 30-minute film is multilingual in Spanish, English, and Zapotec with subtitles throughout. Also available is an accompanying curriculum for secondary schools in the US and Mexico, as well as a guide for teachers of transborder students in Mexico.
Tatyana (Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University) is an Associate Professor in the Programs in Bilingual Education and TESOL at The City College of New York (CCNY). During the 2014-15 she was President of the New York State Association for Bilingual Education and a Fulbright scholar in Oaxaca, Mexico. At CCNY she is the faculty advisor of the college’s DREAM Team (a student club of undocumented students and their allies).
Sponsors: LAII, Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer
Nov. 14

LAII Lecture Series: Vladimir Safatle - What Remains from the Brazilian Dictatorship? The Collapse of an Infinite Redemocratization and the Fragility of Human Rights

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Dr. Vladimir Safatle, a philosopher and professor at the University of São Paulo in Brazil. Dr. Safatle earned his PhD at Paris VIII University, and is author of over a dozen books and monographs that span psychoanalytic theory, developments and extensions of Marxist thought, and human rights. His talk at UNM will be drawn from his book O que resta da ditadura: a exceção brasileira (What remains of the Dictatorship: The Brazilian Exception). In addition to his faculty position at USP, Dr. Safatle has taught in France, Belgium, and South Africa. He is currently President of the Commission on International Cooperation for the Faculty of Philosophy, Literature, and Human Sciences at USP.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov. 14

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Tractor Brewing, 1800 4th St. NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from around Albuquerque come together to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In November, we'll read The Book of Unknown Americans by Christine Henríquez, an accessible adult novel that weaves together characters' stories as "testimonials of men and women who have come to the United States from all over Central and Latin America. Their journeys and their voices will inspire you, surprise you, and break your heart."
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit our related blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For reference, see our printable list of 2016 Fall titles and dates.
Nov. 16

LAII Lecture Series - Joseph Sorrentino: The Unwanted

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 71:00 p.m.
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with photographer and researcher Joseph Sorrentino as he shares his recent findings from field research in Mexico. It's estimated that 400,000 people flee the extreme violence of the Northern Triangle countries of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador each year, passing through Mexico on their way to the U.S. This journey can only be described as horrific. The presentation will cover three projects Sorrentino did in Mexico in 2012, 2015 and 2016. Photographs and refugees' own words will show what the journey is like and how U.S. pressure on Mexico has worsened conditions for refugees. Sorrentino has worked as a freelance journalist and photographer for about 20 years. During that time he's written about farmworkers in New York and chile pickers in New Mexico; campesinos in Mexico and, for the last several years, the plight of Central American refugees. His articles have appeared in Commonweal Magazine, In These Times and 100Reporters.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov. 17

Musicology Colloquium Series: Ray Hernández-Durán: 'Sol y Sombra': Music in Images in the Arts of New Spain

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: In this presentation, Ray Hernández-Durán will present how scenes depicting musicians performing are found in a range of colonial art forms. Here, he will briefly explore religious music from the 16th century through an examination of mission design and manuscript illuminations, and secular or profane music from the 18th century represented in genre paintings, domestic spaces, and biombos.
Sponsors: The University of New Mexico Department of Music, the Center for Southwest Research, and the Latin American & Iberian Institute.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.
Nov. 17

CNM•UNM Latin American Studies Speaker Series: After the Degree: LAS-Informed Careers (An Alumni Panel)

Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: CNM Main Campus, Max Salazar Building, Room 202
Description: Join the CNM and UNM Latin American Studies programs for the final presentation in our Fall 2016 Speaker Series. This event will feature three alumni of the UNM Latin American Studies graduate and undergraduate programs. They will speak about their current work in the Albuquerque community and offer ideas and thoughts about how their LAS experiences inform their practice.
Sponsors: CNM Latin American Studies Program, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the series flyer or the flyer for this specific presentation.
Nov. 18

Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Info & Help Session

Time: 11:00 am- 12:00 pm
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Please join us at the LAII to learn the details about the FLAS (Foreign Language and Area Studies) Fellowship application process. This help session will provide valuable information regarding application instructions and FLAS expectations, and will answer frequently asked questions.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: All potential applicants are encouraged to attend.
Dec. 6

LAII Lecture Series: Thomas E. Chávez - Benjamin Franklin in the Archives of Spain: Uncovering An Unknown History

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with Dr. Thomas E. Chávez, LAII Research Associate and noted historian, as he discusses how, Benjamin Franklin, whom the Spanish always referred to as Dr. Franklin, from his early correspondence with the Prince of Spain through his election as an honorary member of the Spanish Royal Academy of History, corresponded and negotiated with Spanish officials and intellectuals. The success of Franklin's encounters with Spain led directly to the establishment of the United States and effectively hid the record of his efforts from common knowledge. While Franklin's connection to Spain can be gleaned from American sources a whole new and refreshing side to the story is housed in the archives of Spain. The Franklin in the Archives of Spain Project has embarked on an effort to retrieve those never before used records and publish them in annotated form so that students of Franklin, U. S. Independence, and the inception of U.S. Hispanic relations can be studied from a new perspective.
Dr. Chávez is a historian with a Ph. D. from the University of New Mexico. In December of 2004, he retired as the Executive Director of the National Hispanic Culture Center in Albuquerque. Before that he was director of the Palace of the Governors in Santa Fe, New Mexico for twenty-one years. He has published numerous book reviews, articles, eight books, and written a monthly Sunday article for The Santa Fe New Mexican. He recently helped the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art begin an endowment and consulted for the University of New Mexico Press and the New Mexico Women's Forum.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Dec. 9

Interdisciplinary Lecture Series in Linguistics: José Ignacio Hualde - Stressing the wrong syllAble in Spanish

Time: 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Location: Ortega Hall, Reading Room (335)
Description: Join us for a presentation with Dr. José Ignacio Hualde, Professor of Linguistics and Spanish & Portuguese at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Hualde will report on work that he has conducted over the past few years on the phenomenon of rhetorical stress in Spanish and other cases where prosodic prominence is placed on a lexically unstressed syllable. Some of the main findings are the following: Rhetorical stress is realized as a high tone on a syllable before the lexical stress, generally, either the initial syllable or two syllables before the lexical stress. Stress clash is not avoided in this phenomenon and occasionally there is more than one rhetorical stress in a single word. The lexically stressed syllable retains durational cues, so that there is no neutralization of lexical stress patterns. Rhetorical stress does not appear to contribute to better recollection; rather, its function may be to mark discourse as authoritative.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Interpretation is available upon request. For reference, see the event flyer.
Dec. 12

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Tractor Brewing, 1800 4th St. NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from around Albuquerque come together to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In December, we'll read The Farming of Bones, a young adult novel by Edwidge Danticat, an acclaimed Haitian writer who explores the history of the island of Hispaniola as she offers this "sobering novel about 'two different peoples trying to share one tiny piece of land.'"
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit our related blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For reference, see our printable list of 2016 Fall titles and dates.