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Events: 2015

Jan 12

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In January, we're reading Caminar by Skila Brown.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2014-2015 Selected Titles.
Jan 15

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar: Elizabeth Gackstetter Nichols - Sex, Beauty, and Success: Productive Heterosexuality, Good Hair and Learning to be Decente in 19th Century Venezuela

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Join the LAII and University Libraries for a presentation with Dr. Elizabeth Gackstetter Nichols, a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar. In the past decade, Dr. Nichols has traced the roots of the current focus on beauty (understood here as physical appearance, in the main for women but also for men) back to the early years of the Venezuelan state, where beauty began to be constructed as evidence of genetic "purity," whiteness, work ethic and moral value. In this presentation, Nichols will present a brief overview of her research along with her findings at the UNM library, specifically in the Ibarra collection. Particularly in the periodical holdings, but even further in the personal papers and poetry of Sra. Mercedes Mutiz de Ibarra, she will present new evidence of both forces of enculturation that helped shape societal understandings of the link between social class, race, and productive sexuality as well as the expression of those women who understood and lived those lessons.
Nichols is Chair of the Department of Languages and Professor of Spanish at Drury University. She has been working in the field of Venezuelan literature and women's studies for fifteen years. Her current research investigates the construction of social norms of physical beauty in Venezuela and Latin America generally, with particular attention to visual and written representations of the forces of enculturation that define and set the boundaries for those norms.
Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Jan 28

¡SOLAS Presents! UNM Graduate Students: Holly Brause and Lean Sweeney

Time: 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: "Contraband and Spatial Negotiation on the Chiapas-Guatemala Border, 1840-1880"
Lean's presentation will focus on cases of contraband trade, specifically contraband's policing, the processing of cases, and the outcomes of litigation, which suggest that contrabandists were as often colluding with state officials as they were undermining them, and that defense and denunciation of contraband served the political ends of local communities as much or more than those of centralized authorities. Her examination of contraband cases on the Chiapas-Guatemala border reveals the ways in which the criminalization of certain activities, groups, and networks of trade and alliance proved useful sources of local power.
"Norteña Music, Public Space, and Representations of Rurality in Northern Mexico"
Holly's presentation will focus on norteña music, a musical genre with roots in Northern Mexico that has achieved greta popularity on both sides of the US/Mexico border. Holly's research asks: What is the social significance of norteña music on the Mexican side of the border? In her presentation, Holly will discuss her findings, with a particular emphasis on the role of norteña music in intervening in contested public space and as an important representation of rural life as government support for rural livelihood dwindles.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see event flyer.
Jan 29

Lecture: Frances Berdan - Aztec Daily Life: From the Everyday to the Spectacular

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Hibben Center, Room 105
Description: Join the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology and the LAII for a presentation with Dr. Frances Berdan, Professor Emerita of Anthropology and Co-director of the Laboratory for Ancient Materials Analysis at California State University San Bernadino. She specializes in the ethnohistory and archaeology of Aztec-period and Colonial Mexico. Berdan has authored or co-authored more than a dozen books and over 100 articles. Her solely authored books include Aztec Archaeology and Ethnohistory (2014) and The Aztecs of Central Mexico (2nd ed., 2005); her co-authored books include The Codex Mendoza (4 vols., 1992), Ethnic Identity in Nahua Mesoamerica (2008), Aztec Imperial Strategies (1996), and The Postclassic Mesoamerican World (edited, 2003). She is currently co-authoring a book on Aztec daily life and continues her research on Aztec-period feather and stone mosaics. In this presentation, she will consider the complicated world of the Aztecs: "There were rulers and farmers, priests and artisans, merchants and courtesans, scribes and slaves, and on and on. Indeed, Aztec life was a mosaic of different types of people engaging in different activities, living in specialized places, enjoying different rights, and experiencing different obligations. How did people wend their way around this varied world? Through artifacts and historical documents we will take a look at three Aztec lives: a spinner and weaver of cotton cloth, a featherworker, and a temple priest.
Sponsors: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer. For more information, contact (505) 277-1400 or visit maxwellmuseum.unm.edu.
Feb 2

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In February, we're reading The Color of My Words by Lynn Joseph.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2014-2015 Selected Titles.
Feb 4

Field Research Grant Information and Help Session

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Please join us at the LAII for a session to review application guidelines, learn tips for writing research proposals, and ask questions about the LAII's field research grants.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Please see the Call for Applications flyer for reference.
Feb 10

Information Session: Spanish Language & Culture Assistants

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The LAII is pleased to partner with the Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque and the UNM Department of Spanish & Portuguese to offer an information session for all individuals interested in applying to become a Language & Culture Assistant in Spain during academic year 2015-2016. There are around 2,000 positions available all over Spain for university graduate and undergraduate students who have completed at least two full years of college. Positions are offered in the K-12 public school system and public language schools. Assistants will get a minimum monthly allowance of 700€ ($870, as of Dec. 2014). The duration of the grant is eight months: October 2015-May 2016. Assistants will also be provided with medical insurance. Grants will be given on a first-come, first-served basis among eligible candidates; therefore it is important to apply as soon as possible. Applications will be accepted online. The tentative application period is January 7 through April 7, 2015. However, candidates can initiate their registration as of now.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Spanish Resource Center
Notes: For reference, please see the information flyer, or visit the Cultural Ambassadors website.
Feb 12

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar: Cristina Soriano - Tides of Revolutions: Information and Political Mobilization in Venezuela, 1789-1810

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Join the LAII and University Libraries for a presentation with Dr. Cristina Soriano, an Assistant Professor of History at Villanova University. Soriano visits UNM this term as a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar. Soriano is presently the Albert R. Lepage Assistant Professor of Latin American History at Villanova University. She received her doctorate in History from New York University in 2011. Her current project analyses the circulation of information and the configuration of political communities in Venezuela during the Age of Revolutions. She has published several articles and book chapters in Latin American and European journals and books. Most recently, she published "Librerías, Lectores y Saber en Caracas durante la Segunda Mitad del Siglo XVIII," a chapter in El Libro en Circulación de América Colonial: Producción, Circuitos de Distribución y Conformación de Bibliotecas en los Siglos XVI al XVIII, Editorial Quivira, Ciudad de México, 2014.
In this presentation, Soriano will examine how Venezuela remained for years one of only a handful of Provinces in Colonial Spanish America without printing press. The lack of a printing press until 1808, however, did not prevent the Venezuelan public from reading, transcribing, or exchanging ideas during the Age of the Atlantic Revolutions. What kind of information, ideas and experiences fed the political imagination of Venezuelans? How did Venezuelan access these sources of information?Venezuela remained for years one of only a handful of Provinces in Colonial Spanish America without printing press. The lack of a printing press until 1808, however, did not prevent the Venezuelan public from reading, transcribing, or exchanging ideas during the Age of the Atlantic Revolutions. What kind of information, ideas and experiences fed the political imagination of Venezuelans? How did Venezuelan access these sources of information? Soriano will present a brief overview of her research along with her findings at the UNM Library, especially in the Ibarra Collection.
Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Feb 12

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Love Me Para Siempre, Mon Amour

Time: 5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, Rooms 122-124 (1701 4th St. SW)
Description: Join the Spanish Resource Center and partners for a special workshop led by Dr. Inmaculada Martín-Hernández and Ms. Antonia Parras-Albero, teachers at Capital High School in Santa Fe. This workshop will focus on interdisciplinary activities appropriate to bilingual educators. The topic will be timely as they discuss these strategies in the context of Valentine's Day.
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, LAII
Notes: Attendance is free, but please confirm in writing beforehand by emailing cer.albuquerque@mecd.es. Note that the workshop is offered primarily in Spanish. For reference, please see the event flyer or visit the workshop webpage.
Feb 24

¡SOLAS Presents! UNM Graduate Students: Jennie Greb and Melissa Leonard

Time: 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: "Graffiti as Resistance: An Analysis of the Critiques of Capitalism in Bogotá's Street Art"
While known for its rainy days and grey skies, Bogotá's streets are filled with color due to its emerging graffiti scene. The images that fill the blank walls of the city are not the typical scribbling or ineligible messages often associated with graffiti, but are carefully constructed and vibrant works of art. As a result, a sort of clandestine form of resistance has emerged, with many street artists openly critiquing the economic policies of a very neoliberal state. In this sense, the blank wall converts into an autonomous space of resistance, placed within the capitalist-driven setting that is Bogotá. In her analysis of the critiques of capitalism in Bogotá's street art, Jennie examines the work of notable street artists DJ LU, Crisp, and Toxicomano, among others. The result is a study of how Bogotá's street art occupies a unique space of resistance that effectively critiques the neoliberal country in which it is placed.
"The Fruits of Labor: Female Advantage in Chile's Fruit Industry"
The female labor force behind Chile's thriving fruit industry has been largely marginalized by employers, the Chilean government, and the media, and has been routinely passed over by scholars examining the region. Despite their lack of recognition, women accounted for more than 50% of temporary fruit workers, or temporeras, in the country by 1993, and their numbers have remained steady ever since. By specifically examining the effects of Augusto Pinochet's military dictatorship on Chile's agricultural export industry and its rapid expansion in the late twentieth century, Melissa assesses the many complexities surrounding women's domestic roles, relationships with their families, relationships with other women, gendered working conditions, discrimination in the workplace, patterns of consumption, and the right to organize in order to establish whether women were victimized or empowered through their entrance into the paid labor force in Chile.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see event flyer.
Feb 26

LAII Lecture Series: Joseph Kolb - The Santa Muerte Enigma

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII for a presentation with Joseph K. Kolb, a journalist and LAII Research Associate. Kolb has studied and reported extensively on social and legal issues in Mexico for Americas Quarterly, FoxNews.com, Journal of Counter Terrorism, and Homeland Security. He has also developed the undergraduate and graduate certificate in Border Security Studies in the Criminal Justice Program at Western New Mexico University. This presentation will draw upon his research of the Santa Muerte phenomenon in both Ciudad Juarez and the United States: "The inexplicable phenomenon of Santa Muerte that has evolved throughout Mexico and the Mexican diaspora in the US has seen an exponential increase in believers searching for a spiritual alternative to conventional religions. Because of the tenets of the self-admitted cult, Santa Muerte has been denounced by the Catholic Church and has been associated with the violent Mexican narco culture by law enforcement. Yet, belief in Santa Muerte, or the "Boney Lady" continues to grow. This seminar will discuss the pre-Columbian origins of worship among the indigenous populations in southern Mexico, how it remained a relatively personal expression for centuries, then its publication introduction at the turn of the new millennium and its continuously growing mass appeal. Kolb will discuss how believers pray to the icon and for what purposes from home altars to weekly misas held in public temples. He has traveled to these places of worship in the US and in Mexico, spoken to believers, priests, and priestesses, and opponents, to obtain a balanced perspective."
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see event flyer.
Feb 28

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Baile & Música & Drama in Multicultural Bilingual Early Childhood Education

Time: 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: CNM South Valley Campus, Room SV-10
Description: Join the LAII and community partners for a special workshop focused on multicultural bilingual early childhood education. The first half of the workshop will be led by Ms. Eva Núñez, who will discuss "The Importance of Music in the Kindergarten Classroom: Techniques for Reading, Writing, and Singing Songs." The latter half will be led by Ms. Noelia Bellido-Salvatier, who will discuss "The World Through Drama, Music, and Dance: Language Acquisition and Development Skills."
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque in partnership with Central New Mexico Community College, New Mexico Public Education Department, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, and the LAII.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to kphilipp@unm.edu. Note that the workshop will be held in Spanish. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 2

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In March, we're reading He Forgot to Say Goodbye by Benjamin Alire Sáenz.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2014-2015 Selected Titles.
Mar 5

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar: George A. Klaeren - 'Our Holy System': Consilience and the Unity of Knowledge in the Mexican Counter-Enlightenment, 1680-1815

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Join the LAII and University Libraries for a presentation with George A. Klaeren, a doctoral student in the department of history at the University of Kansas. He visits the University of New Mexico as a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar in Spring 2015. His thesis, "Encountering the Enlightenment: New Science, Religion, and Catholic Epistemologies across the Iberian Atlantic, 1680-1815," examines the way that traditional modes of thinking intersected with the new philosophies of the enlightenment in the Spanish empire. He is particularly interested at the history of the dialogue between religion, science, and magic and is currently working on the history of the philosophy of science in eighteenth-century Spain.
In his presentation, Klaeren will consider how, throughout the eighteenth century, drastic changes were occurring in the intellectual climate of New Spain. Commonly referred to collectively as the "new philosophy" or the "new science," these new methods of thought impacted the sphere of the religious and intellectual thinkers of the Spanish empire on both sides of the Atlantic. To many thinkers and writers, these changes were not only direct challenges to established certainties, but represented calls for radical methodologies that would lead to materialism, atheism, and the ultimate ruin of Catholic society. This presentation assesses the reactionary position of many Mexican intellectuals to an "enlightenment epistemology," particularly in response to ilustrado publications during the mid-eighteenth century. Often labeled antiilustrados (anti-enlightened) or traditionalista/casticista (traditionalist), these reactionary thinkers have been portrayed as dogmatic, irrational, and one-dimensional figures. Emphasizing the theme of consilience, or the unity of knowledge, this research demonstrates why these traditionalistas argued against a "Catholic Enlightenment" of eighteenth-century Spanish Empire, what their specific objections were, and how these objections were rationalized and seen as legitimate arguments at the time. It demonstrates how criollo, Mexican religious intellectuals contested for epistemological hegemony in the mid-eighteenth century, proposing alternative, and at times, mutually exclusive, systems for understanding and the pursuit of truth.
Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 14

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Matemáticas & Juegos & Cuentos in Multicultural Bilingual Early Childhood Education

Time: 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: CNM Main Campus, Room KC 125-126
Description: Join the LAII and community partners for a special workshop focused on multicultural bilingual early childhood education. The first half of the workshop will consist of hands-on activities led by Ms. Eva de Andrés, who will demonstrate and explain a range of engaging activities and games focused on math skills. The latter half will be led by Mr. Juan Soria, who will first discuss how stories can be used to foster both a creative imagination and respectful community, and then lead participants in story-building exercisese.
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque in partnership with Central New Mexico Community College, New Mexico Public Education Department, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, and the LAII.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to kphilipp@unm.edu. Note that the workshop will be held in Spanish. For reference, please see the event flyer.
March 17

LAII Lecture Series: Henry Heredia - US-Cuba Relations: Changing Perceptions

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute for a special presentation with visiting Cuban scholar Henry Heredia, the Director of International Relations and Exchange at the Juan Marinello Cuban Institute for Cultural Research. Mr. Heredia holds a degree in education from the Pedagogical University in Havana and has also studied at the Higher Institute of International Relations Raul Roa (ISRI). He has over ten years of experience with the environmental and community group Project Espiral, of which he is a founding member. Since 2011 he has managed academic exchanges for the Juan Marinello Cuban Institute for Cultural Research, and was previously the International Relations Coordinator for the Cuban Writers and Artists Association (UNEAC).
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This lecture is free and open to the public, and will be followed by an open reception. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 18

¡SOLAS Presents! FRG Recipients: Grant Florian and Matthew Schwartz

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: "Ayahuasca, Religious Syncretism, and Modernity in the Brazilian Amazon"
The Santo Daime religion was established in Northwest Brazil in the early 20th century, drawing converts from mixed race "caboclo" communities, which were impacted by the decline of the Amazon rubber boom. The religion blends indigenous practices like the sacramental use of the psychoactive tea ayahuasca with folk Catholicism and Afro-Brazilian religion. In recent decades Santo Daime has begun attracting middle class converts from Brazil's urban centers and abroad. In his presentation, Grant will discuss his visit to two rural Santo Daime communities in Northwest Brazil -Céu do Mapia and Colonia 5000- both of which are home to rural people whose families were involved in the rubber trade, and pilgrimage sites for practitioners of the Santo Daime religion from around the world.
"One and A Half Teeth Per Child: Tooth Loss and Oral Health Among Tsimane Females"
Although much has been written about the links between oral health and reproductive status, there is very little consensus on the causal relationship between reproductive status and putative sex differences in oral health. Researchers have identified myriad pathways from reproduction to oral health, such as increases in the consumption of cariogenic foods during gestation and a tendency of females to eat cariogenic foods in general. Pregnancy related changes in female hormonal profiles also increase the likelihood of periodontitis and tooth caries through a decrease in salivary flow and buffering capacity. Despite the abundance of data on the subject, there have been no studies that have definitively linked oral health causally to reproduction using an evolutionary framework. Matt's research is on the downstream oral health consequences of female reproduction. He investigates the link between reproduction and the behavioral and biological mechanisms underlying oral disease among the Tsimane.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see event flyer.
Mar 18

K-12 Educator's Film Screening & Workshop: Colonization and Resistance in Latin America

Time: 6:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Bank of America Theater, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join us for a free screening of the film Even the Rain / También la lluvia. We'll discuss its usefulness for middle and high school classrooms and how to engage students in its depictions of colonization, both present and past. We will focus our attention on the present-day resistance strategies that have been developed by many of the Indigenous peoples of the Americas, with particular attention paid to the case of the Aymara in Bolivia who have resisted water privatization.
Sponsors: LAII, ¡Cine Magnífico Albuquerque's Latino Film Festival, Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center
Notes: Participants will receive copies of relevant curriculum materials and a certificate of professional development. Refreshments will be served. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Visit our registration site to reserve a space. For reference, see the event flyer.
Mar 19

LAII Lecture Series: Ana Alonso-Minutti - Music as an Intellectual Practice in Mexico's El Colegio Nacional

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with Dr. Ana R. Alonso-Minutti, an Assistant Professor of Musicology and faculty affiliate of the Latin American & Iberian Institute at UNM. Alonso-Minutti holds degrees from the Universidad de las Américas, Puebla (BA) and the University of California, Davis (MA, PhD). Her main interests are avant-garde expressions, interdisciplinary artistic intersections, intellectual elites, and cosmopolitanism. Currently she is writing a book tentatively entitled Mario Lavista and Musical Cosmopolitanism in Late Twentieth-Century Mexico, to be published by Oxford University Press.
In her lecture, Alonso-Minutti will explore music as an intellectual discipline in the context of El Colegio Nacional, and specifically Carlos Chávez's role in establishing the figure of the composer-intellectual. Founded by presidential decree in 1943, El Colegio Nacional stands as the most prestigious intellectual apparatus in Mexico. Among its founding members, Chávez stood out as a central figure in the development and orientation of the cultural practices of the country. Interested in securing a place for music within this circle, Chávez established a model of a composer-intellectual who follows a modernist ideology of musical progress. Over seventy years later, this model still stands. Chávez's successors at this institution have succeeded in defending this ideology and, as a consequence, have guaranteed State support for the creation and performance of Mexican contemporary concert music.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see event flyer.
Mar 19

2014/15 Latina/o Literary imagination Emerging Voices Residency Program at UNM: A Latin American Writer Living in the North: Three or Four Postcards.

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building, Ballroom A
Description: Join the UNM Department of Spanish & Portuguese, the LAII, and Rutgers University for a special presentation from Edmundo Paz Soldán. In this presentation, Soldán will discuss the complexity of identity as a Latin American writer from Bolivia living in the United States. Born in Cochabamba, Bolivia, Soldán is currently a professor of Latin American literature at the Cornel University, where he teaches Modern and Contemporary Spanish-American Literature, Andean Literature, Narrative and Mass Media, and Creative Writing. He received a B.A. in Political Science, University of Alabama-Huntsville (1991); a M.A. in Hispanic Languages and Literatures, UC-Berkeley (1993); a Ph.D. in Hispanic Languages and Literatures, UC-Berkeley (1997). Also, he is the winner of the Bolivian National Book Award (1992 and 2003), and the Juan Rulfo Short Story Award (1997). Soldán has published nine books-with many of his works translated into nine different languages-and he is a collaborator in a variety of diverse mediums including: newspapers: El País and La Tercera; and magazines: Etiqueta Negra, Qué Pasa (Chile) and Vanity Fair (España).
Sponsors: National Endowment for the Arts, Rutgers University, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Office of the Dean of Arts & Sciences, Office of the Provost, Division of Student Affairs, Latin American and Iberian Studies Institute, Instituto Cervantes
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.
Mar 20

2014/15 Latina/o Literary imagination Emerging Voices Residency Program at UNM: A Bilingual Reading of Edmundo Paz Soldán's work

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: Mitchell Hall, Room 220
Description: Join the UNM Department of Spanish & Portuguese, the LAII, and Rutgers University for a special presentation from Edmundo Paz Soldán. This presentation will feature Soldán's work in a unique light through a bilingual reading. Born in Cochabamba, Bolivia, Soldán is currently a professor of Latin American literature at the Cornel University, where he teaches Modern and Contemporary Spanish-American Literature, Andean Literature, Narrative and Mass Media, and Creative Writing. He received a B.A. in Political Science, University of Alabama-Huntsville (1991); a M.A. in Hispanic Languages and Literatures, UC-Berkeley (1993); a Ph.D. in Hispanic Languages and Literatures, UC-Berkeley (1997). Also, he is the winner of the Bolivian National Book Award (1992 and 2003), and the Juan Rulfo Short Story Award (1997). Soldán has published nine books-with many of his works translated into nine different languages-and he is a collaborator in a variety of diverse mediums including: newspapers: El País and La Tercera; and magazines: Etiqueta Negra, Qué Pasa (Chile) and Vanity Fair (España).
Sponsors: National Endowment for the Arts, Rutgers University, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Office of the Dean of Arts & Sciences, Office of the Provost, Division of Student Affairs, Latin American and Iberian Studies Institute, Instituto Cervantes
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.
Mar 21

2014/15 Latina/o Literary imagination Emerging Voices Residency Program at UNM: Re/Defining Being Latino/a in the United States: A Roundtable with Edmundo Paz Soldán, Loida Maritza Pérez, and Diego J. Bustos

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building, Fiesta Room A & B
Description: Join the UNM Department of Spanish & Portuguese, the LAII, and Rutgers University for a special roundtable with Edmundo Paz Soldán, Loida Martiza Pérez, and Diego J. Bustos. Born in Cochabamba, Bolivia, Soldán has published nine different books and is currently a professor of Latin American literature at the Cornel University, where he teaches Modern and Contemporary Spanish-American Literature, Andean Literature, Narrative and Mass Media, and Creative Writing. Loida Maritza Pérez, born in the Dominican Republic following the Trujillo Dictatorship, has published one book titled Geographies of Home, a story following one fictional family's transition from the Dominican Republic to the United States. Finally, Diego J. Bustos is a current Ph.D. candidate in the University of New Mexico's Department of Spanish and Portuguese.
Sponsors: National Endowment for the Arts, Rutgers University, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Office of the Dean of Arts & Sciences, Office of the Provost, Division of Student Affairs, Latin American and Iberian Studies Institute, Instituto Cervantes
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.
Apr 6

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In April, we're reading Serafina's Promise by Ann Burg.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2014-2015 Selected Titles.
Apr 9

Free Public Conference Featuring Rethinking Schools: The Fight for Social Justice in Tough Times

Time: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building, Various Rooms
Description: Join the LAII for a remarkable opportunity to hear from three of the editors behind the nonprofit organization Rethinking Schools. Bill Bigelow, Linda Cristenson, and Wayne Au will present hands-on workshops, presentations, and panel discussions alongside UNM faculty Shiv Desai, Glenabah Martinez, Tyson Marsh, Nancy López, Katherine Crawford-Garrett, Ricky Lee Allen, and Ruth Trinidad Galván. Over the course of the day, speakers and participants will engage with questions related to social justice, multicultural education, and cultural literacy.
Rethinking Schools began as a local effort to address problems such as basal readers, standardized testing, and textbook-dominated curriculum. Since its founding, it has grown into a nationally prominent publisher of educational materials, with subscribers in all 50 states, all 10 Canadian provinces, and many other countries. While the scope and influence of Rethinking Schools has changed, its basic orientation has not. Most importantly, it remains firmly committed to equity and to the vision that public education is central to the creation of a humane, caring, multiracial democracy. While writing for a broad audience, Rethinking Schools emphasizes problems facing urban schools, particularly issues of race. Throughout its history, Rethinking Schools has tried to balance classroom practice and educational theory. It is an activist publication, with articles written by and for teachers, parents, and students. Yet it also addresses key policy issues, such as vouchers and marketplace-oriented reforms, funding equity, and school-to-work. Brazilian educator Paulo Freire wrote that teachers should attempt to "live part of their dreams within their educational space." Rethinking Schools believes that classrooms can be places of hope, where students and teachers gain glimpses of the kind of society we could live in and where students learn the academic and critical skills needed to make that vision a reality. Rethinking Schools attempts to be both visionary and practical: visionary because we need to be inspired by each other's vision of schooling; practical because for too long, teachers and parents have been preached at by theoreticians, far-removed from classrooms, who are long on jargon and short on specific examples.
Sponsors: LAII in partnership with the UNM Department of Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies, and the UNM Department of Teacher Education, Educational Leadership, and Policy
Notes: This event is free and open to all educators, but registration is required for all participants. Visit the event registration website to reserve tickets. For more information, please see the conference website or, for quick reference, the conference poster. Please note there is a complementary evening event which requires separate registration.
Apr 9

Free Participatory Event Featuring Rethinking Schools: The Lines Between Us: Multicultural Education and Social Justice

Time: 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building (Grand Hall), 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join the LAII for a participatory evening event in which Rethinking Schools editors Wayne Au, Bill Bigelow, and Linda Christensen will demonstrate ways that they engage students in critical, multicultural education for social justice. They will explore the implications of this kind of teaching in the era of the common core standards and tests.
Sponsors: LAII in partnership with Instituto Cervantes, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Spanish Resource Center, and Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to all educators, but registration is required for all participants. Visit the event registration website to reserve tickets. For more information, please see the complementary conference website or, for quick reference, the event poster.
Apr 9

Lecture with Dr. Raquel Z. Rivera: The Socio-Sonic Circuitry of Caribbean Latino Music: From Bomba and Palos to Hip Hop and Reggaeton

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Join the UNM Department of Music and the LAII for a presentation with Dr. Raquel Z. Rivera. Rivera will explore the multiple and overlapping musical circuits traveled by music genres such as Puerto Rico's bomba, the Dominican Republic's palos, and Caribbean hip-hop and reggaeton-circuits that often do not comply with geographic, national or language boundaries, nor with racial, ethnic or pan-ethnic expectations.
Rivera is an author and visiting scholar at UNM's Sociology Department. Co-editor of the anthology Reggaeton (Duke University Press 2009) and author of New York Ricans from the Hip Hop Zone (Palgrave Macmillan 2003), her articles on popular music and culture have been published in numerous books, journals, magazines and newspapers. Her areas of scholarly interest are popular music and culture, race and ethnicity, nation and diaspora, and the intersections between Latino and Africana studies. A singer-songwriter, her band Ojos de Sofia has received various awards-including the Rockefeller Foundation's NYC Cultural Innovation Grant-for their unconventional approach to Latino Caribbean roots music.
Sponsors: Department of Music, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 9

Gale Memorial Lecture Series: Diana Taylor: "Archiving the 'Thing'"

Time: 5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Hibben Center, Room 105
Description: Join us for this special presentation with Dr. Diana Taylor, a University Professor and Professor of Performance Studies and Spanish at NYU. She is the author of Theatre of Crisis: Drama and Politics in Latin America (1991), which won the Best Book Award given by the New England Council on Latin American Studies and Honorable Mention in the Joe E. Callaway Prize for the Best Book on Drama; of Disappearing Acts: Spectacles of Gender and Nationalism in Argentina's 'Dirty War', (Duke U.P., 1997); and The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas (Duke U.P., 2003) which won the ATHE Research Award in Theatre Practice and Pedagogy and the Modern Language Association Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize for the best book in Latin American and Spanish Literatures and Culture (2004). The Archive and the Repertoire has been translated into Portuguese by Eliana Lourenço de Lima Reis (Belo Horizonte, Brazil: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais 2012) and Spanish by Anabelle Contreras (Santiago de Chile: Ediciones Universidad Alberto Hurtado, 2014.) Her most recent book, PERFORMANCE, is forthcoming with Duke U.P. Taylor was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2005 and a ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowship in 2013-14. Currently, she serves as Second Vice President of the MLA, to assume the presidency in 2017. Diana Taylor is founding Director of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, funded by the Ford, Mellon, Rockefeller, Rockefeller Brothers and Henry Luce Foundations.
Sponsors: LAII, UNM Department of Art and Art History, UNM Art & Ecology Program
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 10

Interdisciplinary Lecture Series in Linguistics: William Raymond - Representing Lexical Variability

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: Ortega Hall, Reading Room
Description: Join us for this special presentation with Dr. William Raymond from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Raymond is a Research Associate in the CU-Boulder Department of Psychology, and the ASsistant Director of the Center for Research on Training at CU. His research is interdisciplinary work that uses statistical, computational, distributional, and experimental methodologies, drawing on data from large corpora, psycholinguistic tasks, typological surveys, and speech errors. In this presentation, he will discuss the work he and his colleagues have conducted on lexical variability. Recent research has suggested that variant pronunciations of words are represented in the mental lexicon, in addition to canonical forms. How could these representations arise? In his ongoing work with Esther Brown, they have explored what they consider to be an essential mechanism for representational change, the cumulative effects of variable environments on word pronunciations, measured by what we call FRCs (Frequencies in Reducing Environments). Their work suggests that the way in which a word is produced is sensitive to its history in variable contexts, independent of its production context. Raymond will review studies supporting this conclusion that examine discrete phonetic reduction using Spanish spoken corpus data (on initial /s/ deletion; Raymond & Brown, 2012) and data from the lexical distribution of forms in the Spanish lexicon resulting from a historical reduction process (Lat. F- > f~h; Brown & Raymond, 2012). He will then present data and analysis of some new data gathered experimentally on approximantization and deletion in the pronunciation of Spanish initial /d/ words. The new study looks at reduction as measured by several continuous measures of articulation, which allows a more detailed view of the articulatory processes responsible for pronunciation variability. Their findings are compatible with an exemplar or usage-based theory of language representation and use, in which the lexicon stores, through experience, a rich array of contextual information about word use. These episodic experiences shape our knowledge of words and lead, ultimately, to language change.
Sponsors: Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Department of Linguistics, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public, and an ASL interpreter is available by request. For reference, please see the event flyer.
April 15

LAII Reception to Honor Faculty Book Publications

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII for a reception to recognize all faculty affiliated with the LAII who have published books in the past year. Nearly 200 faculty members from 15 departments and 7 schools/colleges across campus are affiliated with the LAII. The breadth of research and teaching of these affiliated faculty members reinforces the LAII's mission to create a stimulating environment for the production and dissemination of knowledge of Latin America and Iberia at the University of New Mexico (UNM). We encourage all to attend this public event to learn more about the exciting scholarship happening at UNM.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This is a free event open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 18

Un taller (K-12) de desarrollo profesional gratuito en Español: Tradiciones Mexicanas – Repensando el 5 de Mayo y más allá

Time: 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Campus Central de CNM, SB 132, 900 University Blvd SE
Description: Acompáñenos a explorar la cultura Mexicana más allá de los estereotipos perpetua dos tan a menudo en los Estados Unidos. Anticiparemos y criticaremos la inminente inundación de celebraciones engañosas centradas en el 5 de Mayo en los Estados Unidos, obtendremos un conocimiento más preciso de lo que esta celebración representa, y ampliaremos esa visión discutiendo una gama de otras tradiciones y costumbres mexicanas. En el proceso también discutiremos la diversidad cultural de los estados Mexicanos y aprenderemos ejercicios prácticos de arte para ayudar a llevar este conocimiento a las aulas. Este taller será liderado por Mary Carmen Sanchez, Master en Educación Especial Bilingüe, con la ayuda de Chris R. Baca, Master en Educación Especial Multicultural.
Sponsors: Organizado por el Instituto Latinoamericano e Ibérico de UNM en asociación con el Colegio Universaritorio del Centro de Nuevo México (CNM), Centro de Recursos de Español de Albuquerque, y el Instituto Cervantes de Albuquerque.
Notes: Los participantes del taller recibirán materiales curriculares pertinentes y certificados de desarrollo profesional. Se servirán refrigerios. Por favor regístrese para reservar su espacio. Haga clic para ver el volante del taller. Additional note: English interpretation will be provided. See the event flyer in English for reference.
April 21

LAII Lecture Series: Catherine Murphy - The Cuban Literacy Project

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII for a lecture with invited scholar Dr. Catherine Murphy, a San Francisco-based filmmaker who has spent much of the last 10 years working in Latin America. She is founder and director of The Literacy Project, a multi-media documentary project on adult literacy in the Americas. As an independent producer, Murphy's work has largely focused on social documentaries. She has field produced films like Saul Landau's Will the Real Terrorist Please Stand Up?, Eugene Corr's From Ghost Town to Havana, served on the production crew of Gay Cuba; and subtitled Stealing America by Dorothy Fadiman, Jaime Kibben's The Greening of Cuba, and Out and Refusenicks by Sonja de Vries. She also served an archival researcher for Susanne Rostock's recent biography of Harry Belafonte, Sing Your Song. While in Caracas in 2009, she founded Tres Musas Producciones, a collaborative production house of independent women producers working in film, music and literature. Four short stories based on her interviews were published in Eduardo Galeano's most recent book, Espejos. Murphy served as senior staff producer at the TeleSur TV Washington bureau in 2006 and has produced content for PBS, TeleSur, Avila TV, Pacifica Radio National, WBAI and KPFA.
In this presentation, Murphy will take about her acclaimed documentary, Maestra, which focuses on the Cuban Literacy Project. As Howard Zinn wrote, "The Cuban Literacy Campaign is an important but little-known chapter in the history of the Americas. Catherine Murphy has created a project with rare and intimate access to this history. Her documentary MAESTRA brings together moving interviews with living witnesses, beautiful archival film footage, and Catherine's compelling storytelling. Based on personal testimonies of teachers and students from the campaign, her film will preserve the oral histories of a generation that will soon be gone. The historical significance of this archive -and its lessons for the present- cannot be overstated."
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see event flyer. KINDLY NOTE THAT THIS EVENT WAS RESCHEDULED FROM APRIL 16.
Apr 21

K-12 Educator's Film Screening & Workshop: The Cuban Literacy Project

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII for a lecture with invited scholar Dr. Catherine Murphy, a San Francisco-based filmmaker who has spent much of the last 10 years working in Latin America. She is founder and director of The Literacy Project, a multi-media documentary project on adult literacy in the Americas. As an independent producer, Murphy's work has largely focused on social documentaries. In this presentation, Murphy will take about her acclaimed documentary, Maestra, which focuses on the Cuban Literacy Project. As Howard Zinn wrote, "The Cuban Literacy Campaign is an important but little-known chapter in the history of the Americas. Catherine Murphy has created a project with rare and intimate access to this history. Her documentary MAESTRA brings together moving interviews with living witnesses, beautiful archival film footage, and Catherine's compelling storytelling. Based on personal testimonies of teachers and students from the campaign, her film will preserve the oral histories of a generation that will soon be gone. The historical significance of this archive -and its lessons for the present- cannot be overstated."
Sponsors: LAII, ¡Cine Magnífico Albuquerque's Latino Film Festival, Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque
Notes: Participants will receive copies of relevant curriculum materials and certificates of professional development. Refreshments will be served. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. For more information, please see event flyer. Visit our registration site to reserve a space.
Apr 23

¡SOLAS Presents! FRG Recipients: Sarah Leister and Corey Ragsdale

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: "'We Know Where We Stand': Knowledge Production in Nicaragua's Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemic"
Chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes (CKDnt) is affecting sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua at extremely high rates. In the last 10 years, it is estimated that 46% of male deaths in the city of Chichigalpa were caused by CKDnt. A variety of global and local actors have converged upon this public health crisis in search of biomedical causes of the disease and methods to prevent devastatingly high rates of premature death. At the same time, ex-sugar cane workers face extreme poverty and illness as many mobilize in protest against harsh labor practices in the local sugarcane company and a lack of governmental support for workers. Based on two months of field research, at La Isla Foundation, a local NGO committed to addressing the epidemic; and 10 interviews with sugarcane workers, family members of CKD-affected individuals, and a scientific researcher, Sarah will present her findings on the politics of knowledge production surrounding this crisis. She will look at how CKD has mobilized local and international actors around workers' rights and how knowledge production has individualized and interiorized disease, thereby eclipsing structural violence.
"Biological Consequences of Cultural Interaction in Postclassic Mexico"
Economic, political, and cultural relationships connected virtually every population throughout Mexico during the Postclassic period (AD 900-1520). Much of what is known about population interaction in prehistoric Mexico is based on archaeological or ethnohistoric data. What is unclear, especially for the Postclassic period, is how these data correlate with biological population structure. Corey addresses this by assessing biological distances among 28 samples based upon a comparison of dental morphology trait frequencies, which serve as a proxy for genetic variation, from 810 individuals. These distances were compared with models representing geographic and cultural relationships among the same groups. Results of Mantel and partial Mantel matrix correlation tests show that shared migration and trade are correlated with biological distances, but geographic distance is not. Trade and political interaction are also correlated with biological distances in Central Mexico, but not in West Mexico. These results indicate that trade and politics likely played a major role in shaping patterns of interaction between populations, and that the socioeconomic differences between Central and West Mexico allowed for different venues of population interaction. This study also shows that the biological distance data support the migration histories described in enthohistoric sources.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see event flyer.
Apr 30

Presentation with Fernando Arenas: Lisbon Stories: Migration, Citizenship, and Intercultural Relations in Contemporary Brazilian Cinema and Literature

Time: 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: This lecture focuses primarily on the experiences of Brazilian migrants in Portugal since the economic boom of the 1990s to the economic crisis of the early 21st century, as they are the object of symbolic representation in film and literature. The analysis will center on several Brazilian texts: Walter Salles and Daniela Thomas' film Terra estrangeira (Foreign Land) (1995), Luiz Ruffato's novel Estive em Lisboa e lembrei de vocêum; (I Went to Lisbon and Thought of You) (2009), and Sérgio Tréfaut's film Viagem a Portugal (Voyage to Portugal) (2011), while critically exploring the dynamics of intercultural relations, identity, community, and citizenship.
Fernando Arenas is a Professor of Lusophone Studies (including Brazil, Portugal, and Portuguese-speaking Africa) at the University of Michigan with a dual appointment in the departments of Afro-American and African Studies and Romance Languages and Literatures. His work centers on cultural expressions such as literature, film, and popular music, which he studies through an interdisciplinary and theoretical prism centering on the dyad of post-colonialism and globalization. He is the author of Lusophone Africa: Beyond Independence (University of Minnesota Press, 2011) (forthcoming in Portuguese, África lusófona: além da independêum;ncia (Almedina)) and Utopias of Otherness: Nationhood and Subjectivity in Portugal and Brazil (University of Minnesota Press, 2003). He is also co-editor, together with Susan C. Quinlan, of Lusosex: Gender and Sexuality in the Portuguese-Speaking World (University of Minnesota Press, 2002). His current research focuses on migratory flows throughout the Portuguese-speaking world and dynamics of intercultural relations, identity, community and citizenship.
Sponsors: Department of Spanish & Portuguese, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.
May 4

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Tractor Brewery 1800 4th St NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In May, we're reading The Meaning of Consuelo by Judith Ortiz Cofer.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2014-2015 Selected Titles.
May 8

Latin American Studies Convocation

Time: 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Hibben Center, Atrium
Description: The Latin American Studies (LAS) program will hold its Spring 2015 Convocation, honoring those undergraduate and graduate students who will receive LAS degrees in May and August. Our keynote speaker will be Dr. Dante DiGregorio, UNM LAS alumnus and Associate Professor in Management.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: Light refreshments will be provided.
Aug 20

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar Lecture: Dr. Daniel Arbino - "Artistic Bombs: Cultural Responses to the Los Alamos National Lab"

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Join the LAII and University Libraries for a presentation with Dr. Daniel Arbino, a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar. Arbino will discuss how, seemingly overnight, Los Alamos went from being described as a "sleepy little town" to a bustling site of scientific testing and experimentation. In 1943, the federal government bought and closed Los Alamos Ranch School and began the transition to what is today known as Los Alamos National Lab (LANL). During the next seventy-two years, the National Lab has garnered New Mexico national and worldwide recognition for its role in atomic and nuclear development while stimulating northern New Mexico's economy via employment opportunities. However, the lab's secretive nature has also led to concerns of social division with the rest of the region while health and environmental anxieties abound. In this presentation, Arbino will use poetry, art, short story, and oral interviews found at the Center for Southwest Research to examine an archive of artistic activism in response to the Los Alamos National Lab. This archive will demonstrate sentiments of cultural loss, eco-imperialism, and nuclear fallout. At the same time, they also suggest complex negotiations that go beyond simplistic binaries. To that end, he hopes to frame a larger discussion around New Mexico's unique relationship with the rest of the United States as it pertains to cultural differences, community, and economic dependability. As a concluding remark, he will draw on commonalities with Vieques, a small island off the coast of Puerto Rico, where the U.S. Marines tested napalm, Agent Orange, cyanide, and uranium from the years of 1941-2003. With Vieques now in its eleventh year of demilitarization, the island offers insight into what options northern New Mexico faces going forward in its relationship with Los Alamos National Lab and the federal government.
Arbino specializes in Caribbean and Latin American literature with a concentration in cultural production from the African Diaspora. Recent projects and publications include "Modes of Decolonization in Francisco Arriví's Vejigantes" in Sargasso's recent special issue on agency and intervention (2013-14) as well as "Making the Visible Invisible: Reading African American Tropes and Anti-Hegemonic Articulations in José Bernardo Couto's La mulata de Córdoba" in Publications of the Afro-Latin American Research Association (2014). He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in Latin American Literatures and Cultures (2013) and an M.A. from the University of New Mexico in Hispanic Literature (2008).
Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Aug 21

Lecture: Dr. Rafael Betancourt - "Cuba Evolves Toward a New Economic Model"

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Continuing Education, Auditorium, 1634 University Blvd NE
Description: Join us for a presentation with Dr. Rafael J. Betancourt, a Cuban economics professor and consultant, as he provides a rare inside account of recent major economic policy revisions on the island nation. The details of US-Cuba relations have been rapidly evolving since the historic December agreement to normalize relations, but privatization of the Cuban economy was launched years earlier as an internal policy matter. Skeptics of Cuban rapprochement sometimes point to the revolutionary government's economic organization as something requiring reform before full normalization of economic relations can take place. Betancourt will detail how significant economic reform is already under way - and how the government struggles between the sometimes competing objectives of private economic risk and reward versus the national policy of nationwide equality. "After 50 years of revolution we have not been able to produce an equal society - and I don't know if we ever will," Betancourt said last month in Havana. But clearly, that objective remains a cornerstone of Cuban economic policy.
Betancourt is an economist with 30 years experience in both the business world and academia. He is a professor at Colegio Universitario San Gerónimo de La Habana, the Universidad de La Habana and Instituto Superior Politécnico José Antonio Echevarría. He is a consultant at Havanada Consulting Inc., a Canada-based nonprofit dedicated to promoting a socially responsible entrepreneurship and economic structure in Cuba.
Sponsors: LAII, UNM Continuing Education, Richardson Center for Global Engagement, and La Fundación Educativa Mexicana de Nuevo Mexico.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Parking is available at no cost at Continuing Education for campus and community visitors alike. For reference, please see the press release
Aug 27

LAII Welcome Back Reception

Time: 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American and Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: The Latin American & Iberian Institute hosts its annual welcome back reception for faculty, students, and staff from across campus. Anyone and everyone with an interest in Latin america and Iberia are encouraged to attend. Join us for mingling and refreshments as we kick off the fall term!
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. No RSVP required. Light refreshments will be served.
Sept 9

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Día de los Muertos and Papel Picado

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Education Building, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join us for an evening of discussion about Día de los Muertos in the K-12 classroom. We'll focus on papel picado as an important yet ephemeral part of this celebration. Local artists/educators Chris Baca and Mary Carmen Sánchez will explore the history of papel picado, demonstrate hands-on techniques for creating it using traditional and contemporary methods, and offer ideas for how to integrate it into the classroom using math-based exercises. Participants will have the opportunity to create their own papel picado to take home, and will receive certificates of professional development along with copies of relevant curriculum materials. Refreshments will be served.
Sponsors: LAII, National Hispanic Cultural Center
Notes: The event is free and open to all K-12 educators, but registration is required. Please RSVP at the event registration website. For reference, see the event flyer or join the event on Facebook.
Sept 10

Presentation: Ethnomusicologist Alejandro Madrid - "Secreto a voces: Excess, Vocality, and Jotería in the Performance of Juan Gabriel"

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Juan Gabriel is arguably the most successful Mexican singer, songwriter, and producer of the last decades of the twentieth century. One could begin measuring his success through the numerous Billboard, Grammy, Latin Grammy, and MTV awards, and more than 1500 Golden, Platinum, and Multi-Platinum Records. The excesses one witnesses in Juan Gabriel's commercial success are analogous to the stylistic excesses one observes in his vocality and the performance of his musical persona. This paper focuses on these excesses and examines them in relation to mainstream ideas about masculinity in Mexico and Latin America. Relating Juan Gabriel's symbolic excess in performance to the Marxist idea of surplus, this paper takes the singer's vocality as a case study to theorize the notion of jotería as a libidinal economy of excesses that puts in evidence the contradictions, silences, and absences of the Mexican and Latin American heteronormative fantasies.
Dr. Alejandro L. Madrid received his PhD in musicology and comparative cultural studies from the Ohio State University. His research focuses on the intersection of modernity, tradition, and globalization in music, dance, and expressive culture from Mexico, the U.S.-Mexico border, the Circum-Caribbean, and among Latinos in the U.S. Madrid's publications have received numerous awards; among others, the Robert M. Stevenson and Ruth A. Solie awards from the AMS, the Béla Bartók Award from the ASCAP Foundation, the Woody Guthrie Award from IASPM, and the Premio Casa de las Américas. Currently, he is associate professor of ethnomusicology at Cornell University.
Sponsors: UNM College of Fine Arts, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Sept 14

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult and older books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In September we're reading Gabi, A Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2015-2016 Selected Titles.
Sept 18

Film Festival: ¡Cine Magnífico! at the University of New Mexico

Time: 10:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Location: College of Fine Arts, Room 2018
Description: ¡Cine Magnífico! celebrates Spanish and Latin American culture through presentation of some of the best of modern cinema in a weekend-long program, featuring work by first-time filmmakers and established masters alike. The subject matter runs the gamut from comedies, action, romances and documentary films, to dramatic masterpieces. Some of the riskiest and most innovative films of recent years will be included.
As part of the broader community programming, 2015 brings an exciting new component to the film festival: free screenings for students and faculty on the UNM campus. This year we will screen two films. The first, to be shown at 10:30 a.m., is "American Dreamers," a crowdfunded documentary about the Campaign for an American DREAM (CAD), a group of six undocumented youth and an ally who risk their freedom when they publicly come out as undocumented and walk 3,000 miles to the nation's capital to organize for immigrant rights. The second, to be shown at 12:30 p.m., is "El Espíritu de la Memoría," a documentary about justice, memory and truth in Guatemala. Two religious individuals share their Protestant and Catholic experiences of working with indigenous communities in the effort to resist transnational corporations.
Sponsors: Department of Cinematic Arts, Instituto Cervantes, LAII, Lobo Reading Experience, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Student Organization for Latin American Studies.
Notes: Although the community-wide programming consists of ticketed events, these campus screenings are free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer or visit the ¡Cine Magnífico! website for complete details.
Sept 18

Exhibit Opening: Mexico at the Hour of Combat - Sabino Osuna's Photographs of the Mexican Revolution

Time: 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology
Description: The Maxwell Museum of Anthropology announces the opening of its current exhibit focused on photograph of the Mexican Revolution.
The Mexican Revolution offered a nascent generation of photographers an opportunity to document a moment of drama, celebration, and tragedy. Advances in technology such as the regular use of halftones in popular periodicals and the ability to transmit images phototelegraphically contributed to an increased use of photography to tell the story of the revolutionary. Both sides in the conflict relied on the visual exposure that photojournalism could provide. Gun and camera were intimately connected, and the photographers were aware that they were recording history. Among the hundreds of photographers who appeared on the scene was Sabino Osuna, a skilled portrait photographer that was ripping open its core. The rules of war allowed him to be a noncombat and not a target and to get close to the action. The images he produced cover primarily the early years of the Revolution, in particular the Decena Trágica, the ten days in February 1913 in which the Madero government was overthrown and the old order briefly restored.
Sponsors: Chicana and Chicano Studies, Global Education Office, LAII, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, Ortiz Center, and the Southwest Hispanic Research Institute.
Notes: This lecture is offered in conjunction with the Maxwell Museum, whose current exhibit, "Mexico at the Hour of Combat," highlights photography of the Revolution by Sabino Osuna. It is part of ongoing program related to the exhibit, which is on view through January 2016. This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.
Sept 18

Film Festival: ¡Cine Magnífico! Opening Night

Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center
Description: ¡Cine Magnífico! celebrates Spanish and Latin American culture through presentation of some of the best of modern cinema in a weekend-long program, featuring work by first-time filmmakers and established masters alike. The subject matter runs the gamut from comedies, action, romances and documentary films, to dramatic masterpieces. Some of the riskiest and most innovative films of recent years will be included in this year's festival.
The festival opens Friday night with a screening of Conducta/Behavior, an award-winning Cuban drama that examines the relationship between student and teacher in the face of wider obstacles. Director/writer Ernesto Daranas will be in attendance, and will provide a question and answer session following the film. For more information about the film, see MALAS student Jake Sandler's summary on ¡El Blog!. After this opening celebration, the film festival continues with a full line-up of amazing films on Saturday and Sunday.
Sponsors: Instituto Cervantes, LAII, National Hispanic Cultural Center
Notes: Outside of the campus screenings, all films in the festival are ticketed events. For reference, including a complete program and ticket prices,visit the ¡Cine Magnífico! website.
Sept 24

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Mexico at the Hour of Combat - The Revolution

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American and Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: Join us for an evening about the Mexican Revolution. This professional development workshop will feature a private tour of the Maxwell Museum's current exhibit, "Mexico at the Hour of Combat," which focuses on Sabino Osuna's photography of the Revolution. Participants will hear background information about the Revolution, engage in hands-on strategies for including Mexican history in middle/high school clasrooms, and receive relevant curriculum materials to help explore the topic more fully with students. Refreshments will be served. We will meet first at the LAII and then walk together to the exhibit.
Sponsors: LAII, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology
Notes: The event is free and open to all K-12 educators, but registration is required. Please contact Amy Grochowski at amygro@unm.edu to reserve your space. For reference, see the event flyer or join the event on Facebook.
Sept 24

Conference: Race and Media Keynote Presentation with Angharad N. Valdivia - Implicit Utopias, Ambiguous Ethics, and Neoliberal Rescues: Contemporary Media Issues

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Location: UNM School of Architecture and Planning (George Pearl Hall), Garcia Honda Auditorium
Description: Organized by the Department of Communication and Journalism, this conference includes nearly fifty speakers representing diverse perspectives and disciplines. The conference will open with a colloquium featuring Dr. Angharad N. Valdivia. Valdivia is Research Professor of the Institute of Communications Research and Department of Media and Cinema Studies at the University of Illinois, Inaugural Head of Media and Cinema Studies, and Interim Director of the Institute of Communications Research, 2009-2014. She publishes on transnationalism, gender and popular culture. Books include A Latina in the Land of Hollywood; Feminism, Multiculturalism and the Media; A Companion to Media Studies; Latina/o Communication Studies Today; Mapping Latina/o Studies; and Latina/os and the Media. She edited Communication Theory and the International Encyclopedia of Media Studies (2012/2013), a 7-volume full-length article encyclopedia with Wiley/Blackwell.
Sponsors: African American Student Services, Africana Studies, American Indian Student Services, Black Graduate and Professional Student Association, College of Arts & Sciences, Department of American Studies, Department of Communication & Journalism, ENLACE, Feminist Research Institute, Latin American and Iberian Institute, Office of Student Affairs
Notes: The complete conference spans September 24-26, 2015. All events are free and open to the public. For a complete program and related information, see the conference website.
Sept 25

Exhibit Symposium: Talkin' 'Bout a Revolution: The Mexican Revolution Outside of a National Context

Time: 1:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: Hibben Center
Description: In conjunction with the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology's exhibit, "Mexico at the Hour of Combat," this symposium will discuss the ongoing importance of the Revolution both within and beyond Mexico. Keynote speakers include Dr. Leila Flores-Dueñas and Carol Y. Vigil, who will together discuss "Soldaderas! Bringing to Light Women's Participation in the Mexican Revolution Through Images, Narratives and Songs." A reception will follow the symposium from 6:00-7:00 p.m. at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. For reference, see the symposium poster.
Sponsors: Chicana and Chicano Studies, Transnational Research Collective, Transnational Americas Research Cluster, American Studies, Hibben Center, Global Education Office, LAII, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, the Ortiz Center, and the Southwest Hispanic Research Institute.
Notes: This lecture is offered in conjunction with the Maxwell Museum, whose current exhibit, "Mexico at the Hour of Combat," highlights photography of the Revolution by Sabino Osuna. It is part of ongoing program related to the exhibit, which is on view through January 2016. This event is free and open to the public.
Sept 29

CNM/UNM Latin American Studies Speaker Series: Ronda Brulotte - Oaxacan Mezcal in the Global Market

Time: 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Main Campus, Smith Brasher (SB), Room 106
Description: Join the CNM and UNM Latin American Studies programs for a jointly sponsored lecture with Dr. Ronda Brulotte, Associate Professor of Anthropology and an affiliated faculty member of the Latin American and Iberian Institute at the University of New Mexico. This presentation discusses the sociologically complex field of production, marketing, consumption, and connoisseurship surrounding Oaxacan mezcal as it emerges in the global market. Not only is mezcal Oaxaca's fastest-growing rural industry, it connects the region to an emergent network of producers, brokers, and consumers across the U.S.-Mexico border and beyond. Mezcal may be joining more well-known foods of Mexican origin commonplace in U.S. markets (corn, chile, chocolate), but its circulation as a food/beverage commodity is distinctly tied to the creation of a new class of global food consumers; at the same time, its growing popularity is spurring the social and economic reorganization of producer communities.
Brulotte earned a Ph.D. in Anthropology (2006) and M.A. in Latin American Studies (1999) at the University of Texas at Austin. Her teaching, research, and scholarship focus on tourism, material culture, critical heritage studies, and the anthropology of food. She has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Oaxaca, Mexico since 1998 and is currently writing a book about mezcal production in the region.
Sponsors: CNM, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, see the flyer for this lecture or the whole Speaker Series flyer. General parking is available at no cost to the west of the Smith-Brasher building on the CNM campus.
Sept 30

LAII Lecture Series: Marygold Walsh-Dilley - Evangelical Protestantism in Rural Andean Bolivia: The Social Impact of Religious Change

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American and Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: Join the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute for the first presentation in our Fall 2015 LAII Lecture Series. Dr. Marygold Walsh-Dilley, Assistant Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Honors College, with a courtesy appointment in the Department of Sociology, will discuss how a 'Protestant Wave' is sweeping across Latin America, challenging the historical dominance of the Catholic Church and bringing with it far reaching social change. This paper examines the contentious process of increasing religious diversity in rural Andean Bolivia. Drawing on ethnographic research in two Quechua villages, she explores why villagers convert to new evangelical denominations, what tensions result, and how increasing religious diversity interacts with non-religious social networks. She focuses in particular on reciprocity networks and practices, which have long been understood as important cultural and economic resources in the Andes. This research highlights alcohol consumption as a key factor mediating both religious conversion and its effects.
Walsh-Dilley holds a PhD in Development Sociology, and an MS in Applied Economics, both from Cornell University. Her research focuses on the intersection between rural development, food systems, and indigenous politics, with a geographical focus in Andean Bolivia. She is a faculty affiliate of the Latin American & Iberian Institute.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, see the event flyer.
Oct 3

Early Childhood Educator's Workshop: Matemáticas y Juegos

Time: 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Main Campus, Ken Chappy Hall, Room 113
Description: Join us for a morning with early childhood educator Eva de Andrés as she draws on over 16 years of experience in bilingual classrooms to discuss mathematics in early childhood education. Children are naturally curious in their first 5 years. The best time to introduce mathematics to young children is at this time while their brain is rapidly developing. During the workshop we'll provide proper use of mathematical talk; activities to engage children in purposeful play; and ideas to support the development of counting and create math connections by using open-ended questions. The workshop is offered entirely in Spanish without English interpretation. Materials, certificates of professional development, and refreshments are provided at no cost. // Acompáñenos una mañana con la profesora de educación infantil temprana, Eva de Andrés, mientras ella discute matemáticas para niños pequeños usando como base su experiencia de más de 16 años en el aula. Los ninos/as son por naturaleza curiosos durante sus primeros 5 años de vida. Durante estos años el cerebro esta en constante desarrollo y los ninos/as son muy receptivos cuando se introducen conceptos matemáticos. En este taller explicaremos cómo usar el lenguaje matemático; actividades para motivar y fomentar el gusto por la matemáticas; así como ideas para desarrollar el concepto de numeros y crear conexiones usando preguntas de final abierto. Este taller se ofrecerá enteramente en español sin interpretación simultánea al inglés. Todos los materiales, certificados de desarrollo profesional, y refrigerios se proporcionarán sin costo alguno.
Sponsors: LAII, Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Spanish Resource Center (SRC) of Albuquerque
Notes: The event is free and open to all early childhood educators, but registration is required. Please RSVP at the event registration website. For reference, see the event flyer or join the event on Facebook. For those unfamiliar with CNM, see our driving and parking instructions. Nota: Para referencia, ver el volante versión en español.
Oct 5

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Tractor Brewing, 1800 4th St. NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult and older books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In October we're reading Lost City Radio by Daniel Alarcón.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2015-2016 Selected Titles.
Oct 10

IV Centennial Anniversary Celebration of Cervantes: Quixote Reading Series in Spanish and English

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 8: 00 p.m.
Location: UNM Ortega Hall, Reading room 335 (Spanish) / Lounge 332 (English)
Description: The Department of Spanish and Portuguese is happy to announce that it is celebrating from 10 to 16 October 2015 the fourth centenary celebration of the publication of the second part of arguably the world's greatest novel, Don Quixote and enthusiastically invites everyone to join in the festivities. To honor this achievement, the department will read the entire work aloud both in English and Spanish and are hoping you will join them for this event by being part of the audience for the readings or, more actively, by offering to read the chapter of your choice in either English or Spanish. To participate as a reader, please visit the Department of Spanish & Portuguese website. Readings will take place in 335 Ortega Hall (Spanish) and 3rd Floor Lounge Ortega Hall (English) mostly between the times of noon to 8 pm.
Sponsors: Organized by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese in partnership with the Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque and the following UNM organizations: S:panish & Portuguese Graduate Student Association, Alumni, Foundation, Homecoming 2015, Popepjoy Presents, Student Affairs, Bookstores, Office of the Provost-EVP for Academic Affairs, and the LAII
Notes: For reference, please see the event poster. For any questions, please contact the Department Administrator, Ms. Fabiola Parra-Oldham, at fabi@unm.edu.
Oct 13

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Día de los Muertos - Posada and Printmaking

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Education Building, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join us for an evening discussing Día de los Muertos in the K-12 classroom. We'll focus on the significance of death in Mexican culture, José Guadalupe Posada and the role of satire in social critiques, and printmaking as a form of resistance. The evening will be co-led by educator Mike Graham de la Rosa and artist Carol Sanchez. Participants will have the opportunity to create their own design for printing on repurposed materals, and will receive certificates of professional development alongside copies of relevant curriculum materials. Refreshments will be served.
Sponsors: LAII, National Hispanic Cultural Center
Notes: The event is free and open to all K-12 educators, but registration is required. Please RSVP at the event registration website. For reference, see the event flyer or join the event on Facebook.
Oct 16

IV Centennial Anniversary Celebration of Cervantes: Quixote Symposium

Time: 3:15 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building, Santa Ana A & B
Description: The Department of Spanish and Portuguese is happy to announce that it is celebrating from 10 to 16 October 2015 the fourth centenary celebration of the publication of the second part of arguably the world's greatest novel, Don Quixote and enthusiastically invites everyone to join in the festivities. As part of these celebrations, a symposium on Quixote will feature two presentations by invited speakers: "Towards a Poetics of Re-accentuation: The Image of Don Quixote in European and American Novels" by Prof. Tatevik Guilamyriam, Hope College; "Emotion and Human Development in Cervantes' Don Quixote: The Case of Sancho Paza" by Prof. Isabel Jaén-Portillo, University of Portland.
Sponsors: Organized by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese in partnership with the Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque and the following UNM organizations: S:panish & Portuguese Graduate Student Association, Alumni, Foundation, Homecoming 2015, Popepjoy Presents, Student Affairs, Bookstores, Office of the Provost-EVP for Academic Affairs, and the LAII
Notes: For reference, please see the event poster. For any questions, please contact the Department Administrator, Ms. Fabiola Parra-Oldham, at fabi@unm.edu.
Oct 16

IV Centennial Anniversary Celebration of Cervantes: Alumni Reception and Plenary Presentation

Time: 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Location: UNM Ortega Hall, Reading Room 335
Description: The Department of Spanish and Portuguese is happy to announce that it is celebrating from 10 to 16 October 2015 the fourth centenary celebration of the publication of the second part of arguably the world's greatest novel, Don Quixote and enthusiastically invites everyone to join in the festivities. As part of these celebrations, the department hosts an alumni reception and plenary presentation featuring Prof. James Parr from the University of California, Riverside, who will present on "Cervantes, His Immortal Duo, and the Book Itself."
Sponsors: Organized by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese in partnership with the Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque and the following UNM organizations: S:panish & Portuguese Graduate Student Association, Alumni, Foundation, Homecoming 2015, Popepjoy Presents, Student Affairs, Bookstores, Office of the Provost-EVP for Academic Affairs, and the LAII
Notes: For reference, please see the event poster. For any questions, please contact the Department Administrator, Ms. Fabiola Parra-Oldham, at fabi@unm.edu.
Oct 17

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Día de los Muertos - Teaching ESL and GLAD Strategies

Time: 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Main Campus, Max Salazar Hall, Room 214
Description: Join us for a morning of discussion about Día de los Muertos in the K-12 classroom. This workshop will focus entirely on curriculum and strategies. Through discussion and hands-on exercises, we will highlight how to use ESL strategies modeled after the GLAD teaching method. We will emphasize ways to actively engage your students in the topic. Materials, certificates of professional development, and refreshments are provided at no cost.
Sponsors: LAII, Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Spanish Resource Center (SRC) of Albuquerque
Notes: The event is free and open to all K-12 educators, but registration is required. Please RSVP at the event registration website. For reference, see the event flyer or join the event on Facebook. For those unfamiliar with CNM, see our driving and parking instructions.
Oct 19

LAII Lecture Series: Michael Stanfield - The Politics of Popular Music in Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation in the LAII Lecture Series as Dr. Michael Stanfield, Professor of History at the University of San Francisco, discusses the politics of popular music in Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile. The presentation examines what the evolution of popular music in Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile reveals about regional culture, the search for national identity, and the interplay between national and international systems. It also addresses why and how the armed forces have often acted as creators and guarantors of national sonic content, and what issues arise from that role for civil society.
As a professor at the University of San Francisco, Stanfield teaches a wide range of courses, ones designed to spark student interest in the past and in what makes us conscious humans. He grew up in San Diego along the U.S./Mexican border, a location that left him optimistic and curious about the other side. He completed his BA at UC Berkeley, an MA at San Diego State University, and PhD at the University of New Mexico. History has always been his passion and Muse, Latin America and the United States the foci of most of his investigations. His research has taken him all around Latin America, particularly to Amazonia and the Andean region. He is currently working on a history of popular music in the Southern Cone.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, see the event flyer.
Oct 21

LAII Lecture Series: iD+Pi Students with Dr. Ted Jojola - The Cañari People of Ecuador: A Perspective of the People and Their Worldview

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with students and faculty affiliated with iTown - Ecuador, an international program offered by the UNM Indigenous Design + Planning Institute (iD+Pi) in Summer 2015. iD+Pi students and faculty were invited by the Cañari people of Ecuador to help create a culturally appropriate ecotourism plan for their community. The Cañari have a history rich in culture, language, and collective values that are expressed through stories, art and music that date back to pre-Incan times. Their history has been greatly impacted by the socio-cultural and socio-political influences of the Incan civilization, the evangelization of the Spanish missionaries and, most recently, by the encroaching and problematic development of non-indigenous communities from surrounding areas. Participating students will present on their experience of traveling to Ecuador to experience "the other" in time and place, and will discuss their proposal for a culturally appropriate plan for the Cañari community.
The mission of the iD+Pi is to educate by engaging faculty, students, professionals, and policy leaders in culturally appropriate design and planning practices. For more information, visit the iD+Pi website.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, see the event flyer.
Oct 21

CNM/UNM Latin American Studies Speaker Series: Michael Wolff - Pacifying the Slum: Police and Gangs in Rio de Janeiro

Time: 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Main Campus, Smith Brasher (SB) Hall, Room 106
Description: Please join us for the second presentation in our Fall 2015 CNM•UNM Latin American Studies Speakers Series. In this presentation, Dr. Michael Wolff discusses how, since the 1980s, drug gangs have become the de facto governing authorities in the favelas (slums) of Rio de Janeiro, essentially splitting the city between areas controlled by the state and those controlled by armed criminal groups. An ambitious public security program called "Pacification," was initiated in 2008, which sought to saturate the favelas with permanent community policing units (UPPs), and break the authority of drug gangs. After an impressive string of successes, however, the pacification program has since run into more serious challenges, including an almost complete reversion to the more violent, confrontational policing methods of the past in some communities. This presentation will ask two questions: Why did gangs in Rio become so strong in the first place?; and, what is causing the weakening of the pacification program?
Wolff is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. His research looks at criminal violence and policing in Latin America, the only world region where homicides and violent crime have significantly increased in recent decades.
Sponsors: CNM, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, see the flyer for this lecture or the whole Speaker Series flyer. General parking is available at no cost to the west of the Smith-Brasher building on the CNM campus.
Oct 22

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar: Vanessa Fonseca - Following the Manito Trail: Los Nuevomexicanos en Guayomin (Wyoming)

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Join the LAII and University Libraries for a presentation with Dr. Vanessa Fonseca, a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar, who will discuss her current research on "Following the Manito Trail." This is an interdisciplinary ethnographic project that documents Hispanic New Mexican (Manito) migration from New Mexico to different parts of the United States during the last century. Looking at Interstates I-25 and I-80 as major migration corridors for Manito families, Fonseca focuses on the driving factors for Manito migration to Wyoming and the exploration of notions of querencia, or how one establishes as sense of self and community through place.
Fonseca is an Assistant Professor of Latina/o Studies and English at the University of Wyoming. She teaches courses in Chicano Literature, Transnational Literature of the Americas, and Non-Western Women Writers. Her research focuses on contemporary manifestations of colonial relationships in Chicano literary and cultural production, looking specifically at the effects of multiple layers of colonial relationships from the Spanish colonial period to the present. She currently is working on a co-edited book project which examines the international presence of Chicano literature.
The Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar travel grant is funded by a generous gift to the Latin American and Iberian Institute from Dr. Richard E. Greenleaf.
Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, see the event flyer.
Oct 28

LAII Lecture Series: Nelly Blacker-Hanson - Ayotzinapa: From the Revolution's Commitment to Education to the Massacre of 2014

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Hibben Center, Room 105
Description: Join us for a presentation with Dr. Nelly Blacker-Hanson as she contextualizes the Mexican Revolution's ongoing importance by drawing connections to recent events. On September 27, 2014 the news broke that 43 students at a rural teacher-training school in Aytozinapa, Guerrero, Mexico were missing; others had died the previous night in a series of attacks. Mexico's government, established after the revolution in 1910, had made a legal commitment to expand public education. Indeed, it became a bulwark of 20th century Mexico. What happened to that commitment? How did it - and other changes in the nation - result in the massacre and disappearance of young students?
Blacker-Hanson earned her PhD in Latin American history from the University of Washington. Her dissertation explored Mexico's Cold War-era, focusing on the role of teacher-activists - including graduates of the school in Ayotzinapa - in the leadership of the opposition movements in the State of Guerrero. Her work reflects research in the national archives, those of Mexico's security intelligence forces, and at the school in Aytozinapa, as well as interviews with former activists in the state.
Sponsors: LAII, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology.
Notes: This lecture is offered in conjunction with the Maxwell Museum, whose current exhibit, "Mexico at the Hour of Combat," highlights photography of the Revolution by Sabino Osuna. It is part of ongoing program related to the exhibit, which is on view through January 2016. This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov 2

LAII Lecture Series: International Business Students Global with Dr. Manuel Montoya - Rebuilding a Cultural Olympiad: UNM's Efforts to Build an Olympic Folk Art Market in Brazil and Beyond

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with students of International Business Students Global (IBSG) and their faculty advisor, Dr. Manuel Montoya. Dr. Montoya and his IBSG students will present on their efforts to revisit the concept of a "Cultural Olympiad" and how UNM is positioned to be the long-term leader in connecting two of the world's largest cultural events to each other.
The Santa Fe International Folk Art Market is the largest of its kind in the world and serves as a shining example of social innovation and cultural entrepreneurship that is ethically engaged and sustainability-minded. In 2015, the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market generated 2.9 million USD in 21 hours. 90 per cent of that money returned to the 173 artists and their communities from 57 countries across 6 continents. The student organization, IBSG, has proposed a three-day version of the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market to be held during the beginning of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. Made up of a minimum of 50 artists, we have identified Parque Madureira and Casa Rio as ideal sites for the market and its accompanying sessions. Produced in accordance with IFAA programs, the Olympic Folk Art Market would include a two-day Artist Training Program that provides market preparedness and business strategies and tools to local Brazilian artists, as well as various think-tank sessions on how art, and folk art in particular, can contribute to the social and economic development of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov 2

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In November we're reading Enrique's Journey by Sonia Nazario.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2015-2016 Selected Titles.
Nov 3

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Máscaras de Michoacán: An Evening with Maskmaker Felipe Horta

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American and Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special evening with Mexican maskmaker Felipe Horta, an internationally-renowned mascarero from Tocuaro, Michoacán, who has dedicated himself since the age of 12 to producing masks for the pastorela (Shepherd's Tale) danzas and other ceremonies celebrated in his community and throughout Mexico. Blending allegory with symbols and scripts from popular culture, these dynamic performances discuss and depict faith, sin, and salvation, and also comment upon the joys and struggles of everyday life in contemporary Mexico. Horta has introduced innovative, fine sculpting techniques into the thriving, vibrant art of mask making, and his exquisite masks are embraced and sought after by dancers and others in his community. Participants will hear from Horta (in Spanish, with English interpretation), paint their own masks under Horta's guidance, and receive copies of relevant curriculum materials and certificates of professional development. Refreshments will be served.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: The event is free and open to all K-12 educators, but registration is required. Visit the event registration website to RSVP. For reference, see the event flyer or join the event on Facebook.
Nov 4

CNM/UNM Latin American Studies Speaker Series: Eric Griego - Building a Creative and Cultural Local Economy in New Mexico: Lessons from Latin America

Time: 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Main Campus, Smith Brasher (SB), Room 106
Description: Join the CNM and UNM Latin American Studies programs for a jointly sponsored lecture with Eric Griego, doctoral fellow in the UNM Department of Political Science. Griego's research focuses on alternative local economic development models and their effectiveness in local communities. Most recently, that research has emphasized practices developed in Cuenca, Ecuador. In this presentation, he will discuss findings from his research and experiences working in Latin America, while emphasizing the relevance to New Mexico communities.
Sponsors: CNM, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, see the flyer for this lecture or the whole Speaker Series flyer. General parking is available at no cost to the west of the Smith-Brasher building on the CNM campus.
Nov 4

Interdisciplinary Lecture Series in Linguistics: Kim Potowski - "Soy los dos": Spanish and Identity among "MexiRicans"

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Dane Smith Hall, Room 125
Description: Join us for a presentation in the Fall 2015 Interdisciplinary Lecture Series in Linguistics as Dr. Kim Potowski, Associate Professor of Hispanic linguistics in the Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago, presents on "Soy los dos": Spanish and Identity among "MexiRicans". "MexiRican" individuals grow up in the U.S. with one Mexican parent and one Puerto Rican parent. What does their Spanish look like after being exposed to these two distinct dialects from birth? This study explores several features of their Spanish, including their knowledge of Mexican and Puerto Rican lexicon and their realizations of coda /s/ and of multiple /r/. Dr. Potowski then describes the ways in which MexiRicans perform identities as mixed ethnicity Latinos with particular focus on the role that the Spanish language plays in their identities.
Dr. Potowski is interested in the promotion of minority languages and multilingualism, particularly via elementary schooling. Her research focuses on Spanish in the United States, including factors that influence inter-generational language transmission, connections between language and identity, and heritage language education. For more information on her research, visit potowski.org.
Sponsors: This event is organized by the Department of Spanish & Portuguese, with additional support from the UNM LAII and Southwest Hispanic Research Institute (SHRI).
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov 6

Field Research Grant Colloquium and Reception

Time: 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII for our first annual Field Research Grant (FRG) colloquium and reception. Three FRG recipients (Katie Sartor, Lean Sweeney and Edmond Seabright) will share their respective research experiences and findings in a series of presentations. Afterward, all FRG recipients and members of the LAII community are invited to come and mingle to learn more about the exciting research initiatives of UNM's Latin Americanist graduate students. All are invited and encouraged to attend this event.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov 6

Interdisciplinary Lecture Series in Linguistics: Hiroto Uchihara - Tone, Phonation and Registrogenesis in Central Zapotec

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: Department of Linguistics, Humanities Room 134
Description: Join us for a presentation in the Fall 2015 Interdisciplinary Lecture Series in Linguistics as Dr. Hiroto Uchihara, Assistant Research Professor at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), presents on "Tone, Phonation, and Registrogenesis in Central Zapotec." Zapotecan languages (or, Otomanguean languages in general) are heavily tonal, and they appear to have been tonal since the time of the proto-language. However, some Zapotec varieties manifest evidence of the loss of an overt tonal contrast, and the emergence of a non-tonal (phonation) contrast or of a covert tonal contrast. This talk discusses whether the tendency to replace an overt tonal contrast, a kind of "anti-tonogenesis", is observed across Zapotecan.
Dr. Uchihara received his PhD in 2013 from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo. His book Tone and Accent in Oklahoma Cherokee, based on his 2013 dissertation, is under contract with Oxford University Press.
Sponsors: Department of Linguistics and the LAII.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov 12

Southwest Workshop on Mixed-Methods Research

Time: 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Frank Waters Room
Description: The US Southwest is home to an increasing number of scholars committed to methodological pluralism and to the appropriate use of both qualitative and quantitative methods for deriving theories and testing hypotheses. The two-day Southwest Workshop on Mixed-Methods Research thus seeks to take advantage of this regional wealth to advance our collective knowledge of mixed-methods research, and to share that knowledge with other interested faculty and graduate students. The workshop will include several panels, as well as a "Master" class, which will address one forthcoming book on mixed-methods research. Each panel will include junior scholars from universities throughout the Southwest, who will present a work in progress that engages with mixed-methods research.
Sponsors: UNM Political Science Department, LAII, UNM RWJF, University of Arizona Political Science Department, University of California - Riverside Political Science Department, and Institute for Qualitative and Multi-Method Research (IQMR) at Syracuse University.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. For more information, please contact either Kendra Joivu (klkoivu@unm.edu) or Sara Niedzwiecki (saran@unm.edu). For reference, please see the workshop agenda.
Nov 13

Music of the Americas Concert Series: The American-Mexico Connection - Virtuoso Piano Music by American & Mexican Composers Featuring Mauricio Náder

Time: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Center for the Arts, Keller Hall
Description: Join the Music from the Americas Concert Series for a presentation of virtuoso piano music by American & Mexican composers. Mexican pianist Mauricio Náder, one of the most active and iconic figures on the Latin American music scene today, presents virtuoso pieces by U.S. and Mexican composers, showcasing a vast spectrum of styles, techniques, and emotions. He performs regularly at major venues in the United States, Latin America, Europe and Asia, and has given private recitals for former presidents of Mexico, France and Spain. His repertoire, ranging from Baroque to 21st century, includes many pieces written especially for him. He has recordered over 30 CDs as a soloist, member of a chamber music ensemble and vocal accompanist.
Sponsors: Organized by the UNM College of Fine Arts in partnerhsip with the LAII, Univisión Nuevo Mexico, UNM Department of Music, La Fundación: Mexican Education Foundation of New Mexico, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Consulate of Mexico-Albuquerque, Conaculta: National Council for Culture and Arts of Mexico, Música y Opera, and the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes of Mexico.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov 14

Early Childhood Educator's Workshop: ¡Qué dramático es aprender!

Time: 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), South Valley Campus, Room SV 55
Description: Join us for a morning with early childhood educator Clara P. de Sandoval as she draws on over twenty years of experience in the classroom to discuss theater for young children. Children are the most natural actors that exist, from the moment that they begin to have consciousness about their first acts. The acquisition of physical and linguistic abilities, alongside the development of recognition in the child, is all the more interesting and fun when combined with the practice of dramatization. This kinesthetic practice allows the child to become fully integrated in the experience of savoring the pronunciation of the words, touching the softness of the costumes, listening to wordplay and repetition, moving to the rhythm of the music and dance, and letting their creativity and imagination soar. If the child is able to fully embrace the experience, the memory will be difficult to forget for it will bring with it a confidence that will accompany him or her into the coming years.The workshop is offered entirely in Spanish without English interpretation. Materials, certificates of professional development, and refreshments are provided at no cost. // Acompáñenos una mañana con la profesora de educación infantil temprana, Clara P. de Sandoval, mientras ella discute teatro para niños pequeños usando como base su experiencia de más de 20 años en el aula. Los niños son los actores más naturales que existen desde el momento en que empiezan a tener conciencia de sus actos. La adquisición de habilidades físicas y linguisticas, asi como el desarrollo de conocimientos en el niño, se hacen más divertidas cuando se integra en el propósito el arte dramático. Esta practica Kinestésica, le permite al niño integrarse totalmente en la experiencia para saborear la pronunciación de los vocablos, tocar la suavidad de los disfraces, escuchar los juegos de palabras y repetirlos, moverse al ritmo de la música y la danza y y echar a volar la imaginación y la creatividad. En si el niño se integra a un aprendizaje completo, difícil de olvidar, ganando la confianza que le acompañara por el resto de su vida.
Sponsors: LAII, Central New Mexico Community College (CNM), Spanish Resource Center (SRC) of Albuquerque
Notes: The event is free and open to all early childhood educators, but registration is required. Please RSVP at the event registration website. For reference, see the event flyer or join the event on Facebook. For those unfamiliar with CNM, see our driving and parking instructions.
Nov 17

LAII Lecture Series: Jorge Ibarra - José Martí and Latin America

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with Cuban historian Jorge Ibarra, who has written extensively on the history of Cuba and Latin America writ large. José Martí (1853-1895), the noted Cuban author and philosopher, spent much of his personal and professional life struggling for Cuban independence. In this discussion, Ibarra will discuss Martí's work in the context of Cuba's liberation from Spain and Cuba's current relationship with the United States.
Ibarra has a distinguished career, having received a degree in Law from the University of the Orient in 1951 and a Ph.D. in Historical Sciences from the University of Havana in 1997. He has worked as a professor of English in the National Council of Culture and in the Political Directorate of the Revolutionary Armed Forces, and served as a researcher with the Cuban Institute of Radio Broadcasting, Cuban Institute of History and Social Sciences, and the Academy of Sciences of Cuba. In addition to participating in diverse conferences, congresses, and other academic forums, he has written on the history of Cuba in numerous publications. He has received the National Critics' Prize three times over in recognition for his books on Ideología mambisa (1969), Cuba: 1898-1921, Partidos políticos y clases sociales (1993), and Cuba: 1898-1958: estructuras y procesos sociales (1996). In recognition of his overall achievements, in 1996 he was also awarded the National Prize of the Social Sciences.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For reference, see the event flyer.
Nov 19

LAII Lecture Series: Jami Núñez - Cozy or Crowded? The Effect of NGOs on Citizens' Contact with Government

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American and Iberian Institute, Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with Dr. Jami Núñez, an Assistant Professor in the UNM Department of Political Science and faculty affiliate of the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute. In this presentation, Núñez address how the challenge of building responsive local governments capable of delivering poverty-alleviating services has heightened with the development of the Sustainable Development Goals. The new goals renew the debate on whether non-governmental organizations (NGOs) engaging in service delivery facilitate government engagement in similar services or crowd them out of the service delivery sector. This paper explores whether interactions with NGOs affect the demands made of government for goods and services. Using a mixed methods approach, she draws on original data gathered in the Peruvian Amazon in poor rural communities. Through household surveys, she finds no evidence for the claims that demand for government services decreases as a result of support from service-delivery NGOs and instead find that some types of contact with NGOs are associated with greater interaction with government. Extending these findings with interviews with community leaders, governments and NGOs, Núñez identifies mechanisms through which NGOs actually facilitate contact with government. The conclusions are generally supportive to NGOs but also suggest opportunities to further strengthen local government responsiveness.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, see the event flyer.
Dec 2

Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Info & Help Session

Time: 12:00 pm- 1:00 pm
Location: LAII, Conference Room
Description: Please join us at the LAII to learn the details about the FLAS (Foreign Language and Area Studies) Fellowship application process. This help session will provide valuable information regarding application instructions and FLAS expectations, and will answer frequently asked questions.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: For reference, see the event flyer.
Dec 7

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: St. Clair Winery, 901 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In December we're reading American Chica: Two Worlds, One Childhood by Marie Arana.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America Through Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2015-2016 Selected Titles.