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Events: 2013

Jan 14

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In January we're reading Hurricane Dancers by Margarita Engle.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public; no registration required. For more information, visit the Vamos a Leer blog or see the event flyer.
Jan 22

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Sue Brown - Development Work in Haiti

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker Series present Sue Brown, who will be speaking about her philosophies as a development worker in Haiti regarding housing, sanitation, humanitarian standards for food, and issues of safety in the face of natural disaster. Sue Brown is a retired physician who worked for Mennonite Central Committee and the Haitian government in the 1970s and 80s. After the 2010 earthquake, she returned with MCC to Haiti for two and a half years.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: Light refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public.
Jan 23

Informational Meeting: Ecuador Field School - Bio-cultural Diversity & Social Justice

Time: 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Location: UNM Ortega Hall, Reading Room 335
Description: The University of New Mexico, through the Latin American and Iberian Institute, offers a new study abroad opportunity in an intensive program of biology, culture, and language study at UNM and the field site, Quito, Ecuador. The Ecuador program offers students up to seven semester hours of credit and features a three-day orientation session at UNM, a three-week field experience, and three days of closing seminars at UNM upon return. Based on human rights and natural rights of Pacha Mama, Mother Earth, the new constitution of Ecuador, Chapter Two, Article 395 affirms that "The State shall guarantee a sustainable model of development, one that is environmentally balanced and respectful of cultural diversity, conserves biodiversity, and the natural regeneration capacity of ecosystems, and ensures meeting the needs of present and future generations." Join us for an informational meeting to learn how you can become a part of this new study abroad opportunity based in the bio-cultural diversity and social justice of Ecuador.
Sponsors: LAII, Spanish & Portuguese, Interdisciplinary Digital Film & Media Program, and support from Professors Enrique Lamadrid, Miguel Gandert, and Michael Thomas
Notes: For more information, please see the event flyer and the informational Wiki page. For questions, contact LAII graduate assistant Sam Johnson at sgjohnson@unm.edu.
Jan 25

Study Abroad Fair

Time: 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building (SUB) Atrium
Description: Join the Global Education Office for a chance to meet representatives of study abroad programs from all regions of the world, talk with returned study abroad students and international student volunteers, and discover the numerous options UNM offers to study abroad or become involved in international affairs here on campus. Please see the event flyer for reference.
Sponsors: Global Education Office (GEO)
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.
Jan 29

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Amber Jacks-K'iche' Maya Oral History Project; Ashley Yoder-A Cultura do Drible: Brazil Revealed through World Cup

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker Series presents Amber Jacks and Ashley Yoder, two UNM graduate students in the Latin American Studies program who have been accepted to present at this year's Student Conference on Latin America, organized by the Institute of Latin American Studies Student Association (ILASSA) at The University of Texas at Austin.
Utilizing the "Maya K'iche' Oral History Project," Amber will present a qualitative analysis of occurrences of Spanish word borrowings within K'iche', a Mayan language of Guatemala. Recent research on languages in contact has shed light on the complex nature of code-switching and word borrowing, eliminating the antiquated idea that suggests borrowing can be explained by linguistic deficiency. The project analyzes word borrowing within the corpus of folkloric stories and suggests that their occurrences can be attributed to culturally unique complexities surrounding contact between the languages and cultures of the region.
Ashley's presentation, titled A Cultura do Drible: Brazil Revealed through World Cup, explores the political and socio-cultural dynamics of Brazil's World Cup victory in 1970, while under the Medici dictatorship, as depicted in Cao Hamburger's 2006 film, O ano em que meus pais saíram de férias. The film pushes the 1970 World Cup to the forefront through the eyes of its protagonist, the 12-year-old Mauro (Michel Joelsas). Analysis reveals that the World Cup functioned only as a momentary veil in a nation wracked by terror, and that ultimately the political reality overwhelms even the most emotionally invested and dedicated soccer fans, embodied in this case, in the most innocent victim: Mauro. However, using soccer for political gain is a practice that preceded the dictatorship and continues into present day World Cup dynamics. Analysis of current cultural production through a lens of cultural studies gives rise to the differentiated rights of various fans, the contested and exclusive nature of the stadiums, and struggles of race and class that persist in the construction of national experience and identity as political projects of Brazilian World Cup participation.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: Light refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public.
Jan 31

LAII Lecture Series: John Ackerman and Lorenzo Meyer - The State of Democracy and Authoritarianism in Mexico after the 2012 Presidential Elections

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building (SUB), Ballroom C
Description: Please join the LAII in welcoming John Ackerman and Lorenzo Meyer, two leading political analysts, for a discussion of the recent presidential elections in Mexico. Dr. Ackerman will discuss "Deconsolidating Authoritarianism: Learning from Mexico's Failed Transition" while Dr. Meyer considers "Mexico: Democratic Authoritarianism."
For reference, please see the event flyer. For more information, including how to access a live webcast of the presentation, please see the LAII's recent news article about the event.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. An open reception will follow the presentations from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Feb 1

Sin Fronteras Film Festival

Time: 8:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building (Room TBD)
Description: The Sin Fronteras Film Festival is an annual film festival hosted by the Student Organization for Latin American Studies (SOLAS). It is held with the purpose of increasing awareness of Hispanic culture and Latin American affairs. This year it is a two-day festival featuring five films, with an opening night focus on "From the Land to Your Table / ¿Que culpa tiene el tomate?" From the Land to Your table presents seven different countries with seven different cultures and points of view, all focusing on the conditions and cultural diversity of popular produce markets in their individual countries.
Sponsors: SOLAS, Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, LAII, Graduate and Professional Student Association, and El Centro de la Raza. The festival is further supported by a grant from PRAGDA through the Spanish Film Club initiative.
Notes: This event is ticketed. For more information, please the film festival blog.
Feb 2

Sin Fronteras Film Festival

Time: 1:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.
Location: The Guild Cinema, 3405 Central Ave. NE
Description: The Sin Fronteras Film Festival is an annual film festival hosted by the Student Organization for Latin American Studies (SOLAS). It is held with the purpose of increasing awareness of Hispanic culture and Latin American affairs. This year it is a two-day festival featuring five films, with four back-to-back selections on Saturday. Join SOLAS and its community partners to see "Undertow / Contracorriente" at 1:00 p.m., "The Death of Pinochet / La muerte de Pinochet" at 3:30 p.m., "The Cinema Hold Up / Asalta al cine" at 6:00 p.m., and "Even the Rain / También la lluvia" at 9:00 p.m.
Sponsors: SOLAS, Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, LAII, Graduate and Professional Student Association, and El Centro de la Raza. The festival is further supported by a grant from PRAGDA through the Spanish Film Club initiative.
Notes: This event is ticketed. For more information, please the film festival blog.
Feb 4

Field Research Grant (FRG) Proposal Writing Workshop

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Please join us at the LAII for a workshop on how to write a successful proposal for an LAII field research grant. At this workshop you will learn what research should look like in the Humanities and Social Sciences. This workshop will provide tips on what to do and what not to do regarding proposal and grant writing. This is a great opportunity to gain insight into what the review committee will be looking for.
Sponsors: LAII, SOLAS
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Feb 4

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In February we're reading Estrella's Quinceañeras by Malín Alegria.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public; no registration required. For more information, visit the Vamos a Leer blog or see the event flyer.
Feb 5

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Elizabeth Halpin - Criminal Queens: Beauty and Power in Contemporary Mexico

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker Series presents Elizabeth Halpin, a graduate student in the Latin American Studies program who has been accepted to present at this year's Student Conference on Latin America, organized by the Institute of Latin American Studies Student Association (ILASSA) at The University of Texas at Austin. Elizabeth's presentation is Criminal Queens: Beauty and Power in Contemporary Mexico. Through an analysis and exploration of the darker side of beauty pageants and their contestants in contemporary Mexico, she argues that representations of beauty carry connotations of more than aesthetic values. Beauty practices, in the instance of beauty pageants, are a broader reflection of the State's social geography. Using the acclaimed 2011 Mexican film, Miss Bala, Elizabeth will show how the collision of the Drug War and beauty contests complicate the idea of beauty as power. In the case of Mexican beauty queens, fictitious and real, their subtle and sometimes obvious participation in narcotrafficking is an indicator of how embodied beauty impacts the broader social structure. She further argues that participating in a traditional cultural practice, such as the beauty contest, women in Mexico are capable of affecting the outcome of conflict in both positive and negative ways. The coercive and violent power exercised by the drug cartels in contemporary Mexico has not kept beauty queens from participating in their rituals. Through understanding beauty pageants as ritual communication, participants (contestants and audience) accept rather than resist social compulsion through their performance of the ritual. Even though the beauty contests are an enactment of gender norms and expectations, rituals are about what can be - the potential of reality. Accommodating the political, economic, and social changes brought on by the Drug War, beauty practices have come to foster community transformation, impacting the social geography of Mexico.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: Light refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Feb 6

Field Research Grant Information and Help Session

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Please join us at the LAII for a session to review application guidelines, learn tips for writing research proposals, and ask questions about the LAII's field research grants.
Sponsors: LAII, SOLAS
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Feb 7

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar: Allison Bigelow - Technical Literacies and Unlettered Work: Women Miners in the Seventeenth Century Andes

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description: Join the LAII and University Libraries for a presentation with Allison Bigelow, a recipient of the Greenleaf Visiting Library travel grant. The travel grants, funded by a generous gift to the LAII from Dr. Richard E. Greenleaf, provide faculty and graduate students the opportunity to visit UNM to work with one of the largest and most complete Latin American library collections in the United States. Her research addresses the following: In 1641, an indigenous woman named Bartola Sisa discovered a silver vein while prospecting in the province of Chayanta, about 200 miles northwest of Potosí. With a loan of 300 pesos from an indigenous man, Sisa initiated the protocols of discovery: she named the site, assayed the ore, and contracted miners to extract the material after she had determined its high value. A Spaniard named Cristóbal Cotes eagerly watched this process and appeared one day with a proposal. He told her that because she was a woman, imperial law would not permit her to own the site, so he offered to register the vein under his name in exchange for a share of the profits. Bartola Sisa reluctantly accepted, but when Cotes violated the terms of their agreement by preventing her from returning to the site, she sued him for unlawful occupation of the asset. And she won.
Because Andean legend prohibited women from entering underground tunnels - animate, feminized spaces who expressed their jealousy at the intrusion of biological women by cursing a site - historians, literary scholars, and anthropologists have argued for the need to shift our view of Potosí from the mines to the markets in order to hear women's stories. But colonial archival records prove that native and creole women did enter mines, and that when they did they made good livings as miners, refiners, and managers. This talk explains how women like Bartola Sisa used their technical literacies, or ways of knowing and speaking that were grounded in technical expertise in silver mining and metallurgy, to negotiate overlapping imperial laws and colonial jurisprudence in order to protect their production of silver. The framework of technical literacies allows us to appreciate the substantial contributions that indigenous and creole women made to the largest sector of the colonial economy, and how their unlettered work helped to shape Spanish imperial policies as they were applied in the provinces of Alto Perú.
Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Feb 7

K-12 Educators Workshop: Grandes secretos sobre cómo enseñar la gramática española: Una aplicación práctica del enfoque cognitivo en el aula

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join the Spanish Resource Center and partners for a special workshop focused on teaching strategies for explaining Spanish grammar. "Si bien se presupone que los profesores saben describir la gramática a sus alumnos, la realidad es que nuestro conocimiento gramatical se basa en una serie de creencias y de descripciones que no siempre responde al auténtico funcionamiento de las formas y que, además, no siempre resultan operativas ni accesibles para los estudiantes. Este taller revisará descripciones, explicaciones y actividades gramaticales al uso y ofrecerá, basándose en las aportaciones teóricas del enfoque cognitivo, maneras distintas de abordar la gramática, a lo largo de todo el proceso de instrucción gramatical, poniendo especial énfasis en los mecanismos que permiten que los estudiantes accedan a los saberes gramaticales. Se tratarán temas como el uso de ser y estar, las diferencias entre el pretérito imperfecto y el pretérito indefinido, los pronombres de objeto directo e indirecto o los pronombres reflexivos."
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, LAII
Notes: The workshop will be presented by Carlos Soler, Academic Director for the Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque. Attendance is free, but please confirm in writing by email cer.albuquerque@mecd.es. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Feb 12

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Robbie Burger - The Social Life of a Chilean Rodent

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker series presents Robbie Burger, a UNM graduate student in biology and recipient of a 2012 LAII/Tinker Field Research Grant. Robbie is a PhD student in the Department of and Fellow in the Program in Interdisciplinary Biological and Biomedical Sciences. His research involves the evolutionary ecology, behavior, and conservation of mammals, including modern humans.
The phenomenon of sociality or group-living has long received attention from diverse fields ranging from evolutionary biology and ecology to sociology and economics. I am collaborating with biologists from the US and Chile to investigate the social behavior of Octodon degus, a small mammal native to central Chile. Degus form social groups that share burrow systems underground at night and forage above ground during the day. Females are core members of groups and assist each other when caring for young. We use field observations to determine social networks among degus. We compare degu sociality between the austral winter, when degus are breeding, and the austral spring, when degus give birth and rear their offspring. We find that degu social networks vary by sex and between seasons. Turnover is higher among male associations than females. Females tend to form stronger associations when caring for young. Conflict is associated with lower fertility within groups. Our results shed light into the evolutionary consequences of sociality.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: Light refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public.
Feb 13

LAII Lecture Series: Roberto Elvira Mathez - MundoVilla: Participatory Journalism in the Villas Miserias (Marginal Neighborhoods) of Buenos Aires

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Roberto Elvira Mathez, academic liaison for MundoVilla. MundoVilla is a nonprofit organization in Argentina that prepares new journalists in the Villas Miserias (Argentinean term for marginal neighborhoods) with journalism workshops dedicated to the young and adults in the marginal zones of the city of Buenos Aires. The divulgation of other realities and the stimulation of social integration is the objective of the radio and newspaper that are part of the NGO. For more information, visit the websites for MundoVilla's newspaper (http://www.mundovilla.com) and radio program, Mundo Sur FM (http://new.wellesly.edu).
Sponsors: LAII, SOLAS
Notes: Light refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Feb 14

LAII Lecture Series: Eduardo Santana-Castellón - The Sierra de Manantlán Biosphere Reserve: A Case Study in Socio-Environmental Conflict and Collaboration

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Dr. Eduardo Santana-Castellón, long-term professor and researcher at the University of Guadalajara (UdG), Jalisco, Mexico. Dr. Santana-Castellón will explore how Mexico was one of the pioneering countries in establishing the first biosphere reserves in the world. The "Mexican Modality" proposed experiments in local participation in reserve management, a policy later adopted by the international MAB-UNESCO network. One such experiment was the Sierra de Manantlán Biosphere Reserve, the sixth of the 42 biosphere reserves created in Mexico. Originally, the reserve developed as an open experiment in sustainable territory management in contrast to the view of reserves as "sieged conservation castles". Santana-Castellón describes the reserve's particular pioneering experiences in aspects such as: birth from a scientific discovery in the context of a paradigm shift in the conservation field; alliance between university conservationists and local communities defending their natural resources against lumber and mining interests; a bio-cultural approach to the conservation of native agricultural cultivars; linkages among management and research institutions to develop an adaptive management strategy; establishment of legitimate stakeholder participation platforms in reserve management; environmental education programs as a multi-directional communication mechanisms; community-based natural resource management programs; catalyzing new conservation "institutionalities" at the inter-municipal level in the reserve's bio-region of influence; and more recently, participating as a pilot project in the implementation of payment-for-ecosystem-services mechanisms. The challenges, successes and failures of this local experience will be the basis for discussing the evolution and adaptation of the biosphere reserve concept.
Sponsors: LAII, Global Education Office
Notes: Light refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Feb 19

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Cynthia Casas - The Mexican Quetzalcóatl (The Feathered Serpent): Cultural Hero and Modern Aesthetic

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII and SOLAS for a special presentation with Visiting Assistant Professor Cynthia Casas from the UNM Department of Spanish & Portuguese.
This lecture will address an inquiry into the abundant and illuminating appearance of the Feathered Serpent or La Serpiente Emplumada Quetzalcóatl within a modern cultural and literary context. This guardian of civilization, re-creative power, wind, and penitence (in his form as a priest-king) maintains his presence across Mexican history dating back to ancient sources. The recurring references to the Feathered Serpent within modern Mexican literature point to a preoccupation with his significance within the Aztec/Mexica cosmovision as well as outside of it. The foundational value of this Indianist preoccupation in the modern Mexican cultural and literary imagination operates along a distinct paradigm severed and extracted from Aztec mythology and pre-Hispanic primary sources. As disconnected as this paradigm may be, it still heavily depends upon Aztec images and aesthetic leitmotifs transferred into a modern framework on the part of Mexican writers, primarily Octavio Paz and José Vasconcelos, who inscribe this inherited neo-Aztec aesthetic into a political, historical, cultural, and ideological vision.
The discussion will revolve around the intellectual and cultural symbol Quetzalcóatl within Mexican literary and cultural production as an archetypal emblem of revolution, change, renovation, and a vision towards the future while maintaining the anchor of Mexican 'tradition' based on an originary mythical source which resists a eurocentric paradigm of thought. These writers employ this inherited aesthetic, specifically concentrated in Quetzalcóatl as a medium to exercise a political and ideological critique of Mexico after the Revolution.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Feb 21

LAII Lecture Series: Brian Winkenweder - Refugees, Natives and Kites: Hans Namuth in Spain and Guatemala

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Dr. Brian Winkenweder, Associate Professor of Art History and Chair of the Department of Art and Visual Culture at Linfield College in McMinnville, Oregon. Hans Namuth, most well-known for his photographs and films of Jackson Pollock painting, enjoyed fame as a leading photographer of visual artists during the second half of the 20th century. This achievement, however, eclipses Namuth's equally significant contributions as a photojournalist. For instance, Namuth was on assignment in Barcelona, Spain to cover the 1936 Worker's Olympiad (a protest against the Berlin Olympics) when Civil War broke out. Although the games were cancelled, Namuth stayed in Spain photographing for Vu Magazine. Namuth's photos were subsequently used as evidence to prove that Robert Capa's famous photo, Death of a Loyalist Soldier, was not faked as is often asserted. Another one of Namuth's Spanish Civil War photographs was used by John Heartfield in a collage. After World War II, Namuth married Carmen Herrera, a Guatemalan citizen. He visited that country for the first time in 1946. While there he met a young anthropologist, Maud Oakes, who asked him to photograph the Mam Indians in the small village of Todos Santos, near Huehuetenango for the book she was writing. After an earthquake devastated the region in 1976, Namuth returned to discover that in the passage of thirty years the Mam Indians were suffering not only from the aftermath of the earthquake but also from the negative effects of corporate colonialism. He began a project to photograph all of the Mam of Todos Santos in order to document their rapidly changing culture. In addition, Namuth is responsible for increasing the world's awareness of Santiago de Sacatepequez, another small village known for the large, colorful kites the Kaqchikel Indians construct and fly from their cemetery on All Saints Day. This presentation examines Hans Namuth's contributions to the history of photography with an emphasis on how his efforts as a photographer in Spain and Guatemala helped promote social justice in the world.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Feb 21

K-12 Educators Workshop: La integración del español coloquial en la clase de E/LE

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join the Spanish Resource Center and partners for a special workshop focused on using colloquial Spanish in classrooms where Spanish is taught as a second language. "Hablar una lengua extranjera no es sólo llegar a dominar sus reglas gramaticales y de construcción de la misma, sino saber comunicar y ser capaz de interactuar, de intercambiar e interpretar la información de forma natural con hablantes nativos. Este taller se centra en la descripción y explicación de los principales rasgos del español coloquial, así como de algunos de los principios que rigen la interacción y la conversación. Se ofrecerán una serie de líneas de actuación para el análisis del español desde este punto de vista, insistiendo en el modo de plantear su estudio en el ámbito del español como lengua extranjera."
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, LAII
Notes: The workshop will be presented by Carlos Soler, Academic Director for the Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque. Attendance is free, but please confirm in writing by email cer.albuquerque@mecd.es. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Feb 22

K-12 Event: Spanish Model UN

Time: 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: The Spanish Model UN Conference began as a final project in one of the advanced courses at Bosque School. Since the beginning the intent was to help stimulate the dissemination of the Spanish language and culture in a relevant, authentic context. In the last several years this project has expanded by including the advanced students from Sandia Prep and Corrales International School as participants and the Instituto Cervantes and the University of New Mexico Latin American and Iberian Institute as sponsors. One of the purposes of this event is to develop and practice skills for debate, analysis, discussion, conflict resolution and negotiation among its participants, following the model applied by the organization. Similarly, the Model United Nations' goal is to create an awareness of the vital and humanitarian mission of the United Nations in the world.
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, Bosque School, Sandia Prep, Corrales International School, and LAII
Notes: This event is free to observe, but registration must be confirmed in advance by writing to kphilipp@unm.edu.
Feb 22

Biofuel Land Use Change: Using Models to Illuminate Policy Options' Impacts

Time: 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: Economics, Room 1052
Description: Julie Witcover is an Assistant Project Scientist at the Institute of Transportation Studies (ITS), University of California - Davis. Her research focus is indirect land use effects of biofuel policy: understanding sources of varied modeling results, and developing policy options. She is interested in how new demands from a developing bioeconomy can be integrated with existing landscape uses, especially adequate food provision, while protecting key environmental services. She has a PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from UC Davis, and worked as a postdoc at ITS before moving to her current position. Prior to ITS, her research focused on drivers of deforestation along agricultural frontiers, especially in the Brazilian Amazon. Her dissertation involved a dynamic optimization model of small-scale settlers' deforestation decisions in a setting of market separability. As a research analyst at the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington, DC, she was involved in fieldwork and data analysis (econometrics, household iterative-dynamic optimization model) for a project looking at tropical deforestation drivers in the western Brazilian Amazon. She also performed a rapporteurial role for an ecoregional conference on Agricultural Growth, Environmental Sustainability, and Poverty Alleviation (Tegucigalpa, Honduras - in Spanish).
She holds an M.A. from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Latin American Studies as well as International Economics. She also holds an A.B. in Government from Harvard.
Sponsors: Department of Economics, Latin American Studies
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Feb 26

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Ralph Bolton, Applying Anthropology in Highland Peru: From Vicos to Chijnaya

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker series presents Ralph Bolton, Professor of Anthropology at Pamona College and President and Chairman of the Board of The Chijnaya Foundation, an organization which works in partnership with rural communities in Southern Peru to design and implement self-sustaining projects in health, education, and economic development.
In the 1950s, Vicos was a traditional hacienda in the Callejon de Huaylas. The inhabitants of Vicos were serfs who worked for the hacendado in exchange for access to small plots of land to raise subsistence crops. In the late 50s, Cornell University rented the hacienda and launched one of the most significant and controversial projects in the budding field of applied anthropology. As a Peace Corps volunteer several years later, Professor Bolton was the Field Director of a project in the southern highlands of Peru that in many respects replicated the Vicos Project, both of them constituting pilot agrarian reform actions before a national agrarian reform was carried out in the 1970s by the military junta led by Juan Velasco Alvarado. This was the Taraco-Chijnaya Project.
In 2004, Professor Bolton returned to Chijnaya for a reunion with the campesinos with whom he had worked more than four decades earlier. On this festive occasion, he was asked to collaborate with the community again. As a result, a group of ex-Peace Corps Volunteers and friends created The Chijnaya Foundation. In this talk, he will discuss the work of the Foundation in rural villages on the Peruvian Altiplano. The Foundation's approach to improving the quality of life in this impoverished area is fairly unique, but it builds on the lessons learned during the Vicos and Chijnaya projects.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 1

Exhibiting Latino Popular Religious Traditions: New Mexico in a Transnational Context

Time: 1:00 p.m. - 6:45 p.m.
Location: UNM Mesa del Sol IFDM Building, 5700b University Blvd. SE
Description: Join us for a two-day symposium composed of presentations that, together, represent research and documentation of popular religious celebrations in different places in the Ibero-American world. The presentations explore how community-based religious ceremonies are expressions of local, regional, and transnational affinities. The lecturers themselves come from the disciplines of Hispanic Studies, Anthropology, American Studies, Community & Journalism, and Chicano/Hispano/Mexicano Studies. Related photography exhibitions will be on view to complement the speakers' presentations. See event flyer for a complete itinerary of speakers and their foci, as well descriptions of the photo exhibits.
Sponsors: American Studies, Religious Studies, Interdisciplinary Film & Digital Media Program, Spanish & Portuguese, Center for Regional Studies, the Latin American & Iberian Institute, Museum of Spanish Colonial Art
Notes: This event is free and open to the public.
Mar 1

Exhibition: Challa: Fiesta Carnaval del Valle de Codpa

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, 555 Camino de la Familia, Santa Fe, NM
Description: Join us for the opening reception of Challa, a vibrant photography exhibit composed of images taken during 2011 and 2012 by photographer Rodrigo Villalon and produced by Fernando Rivera at carnival in Codpa Valley. It aims to promote traditional culture through photography and cultural management. For more information, please see the event flyer and accompanying descriptive text.
At the point where Chile, Peru, and Bolivia share a beautiful landscape and hostile climate, there a strong and wise culture has lived for centuries under the sun. They have been able to keep alive a rich heritage and an admirable history of the Aymara culture. It is in the village of Codpa, located one hour from Arica City in northern Chile, where there developed one of the most important and crowded activities in the Andean tradition: the carnival. The origins of the carnival are from the European Middle Ages. It was a popular celebration where the social, political, and moral critiques were staged publicly just before the celebration of the Catholic Lent. This festival arrived to Latin America with the Spanish colonization and was merged with a set of beliefs and practices, mainly rites that celebrated and thanked the fertility of the earth and also the ancestor worship. The carnival presents a clear manifestation of cultural syncretism.
Sponsors: LAII, El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, Cornerstones
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. The exhibit will run until April 1, 2013.
Mar 1

Exhibition: Prints from El Taller Gráfica Popular

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, 555 Camino de la Familia, Santa Fe, NM
Description: Join us for an opening reception, concurrent with that for Challa (see above), for an exhibition of prints from El Taller de Gráfica Popular." The exhibit, originally shown at UNM Zimmerman Library in Spring 2012, "explores the imagery of "El Taller de Gráfica Popular" (Popular Graphics Workshop). TGP is a graphic art collective founded in Mexico City in 1937....topics at the core of their prints and addressed in this show include: Mexico's divided heritage and fragmented history; poverty and oppression; defending the nationalization of natural resources; civil liberties for labor movements; education; agrararian reform; free speech; and human rights and social justice for the popular classes" (read more about the original exhibition in UNM Today).
Sponsors: LAII, El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, UNM University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. The exhibit will run until April 1, 2013.
Mar 2

Exhibiting Latino Popular Religious Traditions: New Mexico in a Transnational Context

Time: 1:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Location: Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, Santa Fe, 750 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe, NM
Description: Join us for a two-day symposium composed of presentations that, together, represent research and documentation of popular religious celebrations in different places in the Ibero-American world. The presentations explore how community-based religious ceremonies are expressions of local, regional, and transnational affinities. The lecturers themselves come from the disciplines of Hispanic Studies, Anthropology, American Studies, Community & Journalism, and Chicano/Hispano/Mexicano Studies. Related photography exhibitions will be on view to complement the speakers' presentations. See event flyer for a complete itinerary of speakers and their foci, as well descriptions of the photo exhibits.
Sponsors: American Studies, Religious Studies, Interdisciplinary Film & Digital Media Program, Spanish & Portuguese, Center for Regional Studies, the Latin American & Iberian Institute, Museum of Spanish Colonial Art
Notes: The standard $10 museum entrance fee will be waived will UINM ID. This event is free and open to the public.
Mar 4

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In March we're reading Leaving Glorytown: One Boy's Struggle Under Castro by Eduardo Calcines.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public; no registration required. For more information, visit the Vamos a Leer blog or see the event flyer.
Mar 5

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Peace Corps Panel

Time: 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building (SUB) Lobo A & B
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker series presents a panel discussion for National Peace Corps Week. Have you ever considered volunteering in the Peace Corps? Discover the benefits of Peace Corps service from a panel of returned volunteers and help us celebrate Peace Corps' 52nd birthday. Join us to hear challenging, rewarding, and inspirational moments. Have your questions answered and gain tips to guide you through the application process.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 5

Panel Discussion and Book Signing: In the Wake of Juárez

Time: 3:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Location: UNM Art Museum
Description: Join the LAII and the UNM Art Museum for a panel presentation and artist lecture focused on the museum's exhibit "In the Wake of Juárez: The Drawings of Alice Leora Briggs," on view in the Clinton Adams Gallery from February 2 to May 25, 2013.
The panel presentation will run from 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., offering complementary discussions by Charles Bowden, essayist and author of Dreamland: The Way Out of Juárez (2010), with drawings by Alice Leora Briggs; Julián Cardona, Juárez resident, photographer, and journalist, and collaborator with Charles Bowden on the book Exodus/Éxodo (2008), about the Mexican migration north; and Molly Molloy, Research and Reference Librarian, NMSU, Las Cruces, specializing in Latin American studies and U.S.-Mexico border issues.
Then, from 5:30-6:30 p.m., the artist will present a lecture titled "Basta!" and discuss the work she made in Juárez between 2007 and 2012. The city was an remains the center of the Mexican drug wars, and these drawings are part of a larger mission to understand why the "uncivilized" is such an integral part of the "civilized" in modern life."
With expressionist bravado and technical cool, Briggs' remarkable sgraffito (literally "scratch") drawings capture the Inferno that the city [Juárez] has become. Freely appropriating Renaissance prints and paintings of the Last Judgment, the Crucifixion and other martyrdoms, public executions, tortures, and wars by artists from Holbein to van der Weyden, and immersing herself in literature of Dante and Cormac McCarthy, Briggs merges old world fears with present-day realities to create a disturbing yet compelling picture of the human condition.
Sponsors: The Raymond Jonson Trust and the Allene H. and Walter P. Kleweno Lecture Series, UNM Art Museum, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Copies of Dreamland will be available for purchase and signing. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 5

K-12 Educators Workshop: Stitching Resistance: Chilean Arpilleras in the Classroom

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: The National Hispanic Cultural Center and the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute are coming together once again to provide another in-depth and profound look at Latin America history, art and experience via special events tailored for New Mexico teachers. This pair of workshops will focus on demonstrations and resources designed to bring the history of Chile and the arpillera art form alive in classrooms! Teachers from grades 4-12 will benefit most from this content, though all are welcome to attend.
Nearly 40 years ago, the armed forces of Chile overthrew the administration of Salvador Allende. That day, September 11, 1973, created the necessary conditions for the art form known as arpilleras. These textiles became the most visual (and visible), poignant, and widespread manifestation of opposition to authoritarianism, violation of human rights and the disappearance of loved ones associated with the military government that ruled Chile until 1990.
This workshop will start with a private tour of the NHCC art museum, led by NHCC Education Director Dr. Shelle Sánchez, to provide a face-to-face experience of the artwork of the exhibition Stitching Resistance: The History of Chilean Arpilleras. After the tour, we'll provide different curriculum perspectives for how to bring this history and art into the classroom.
Sponsors: National Hispanic Cultural Center, LAII
Notes: This workshop is free, but teachers are asked to register in advance given limited space and materials. Please contact the LAII at kphilipp@unm.edu or (505) 277-7047. All educator participants will receive a certificate of professional development. Refreshments and copies of the curriculum materials will be provided. Please see the event flyer for reference.
Mar 7

Symposium: Got Rights? Human Ecologies of Ethnicity, Race and Memory in Human Rights Discourses

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Zimmerman Library
Description: Please join the UNM Department of Spanish & Portuguese on March 7 and 8 in the Willard Room of Zimmerman Library on the University of New Mexico Albuquerque campus for their first annual Human Rights Symposium. The symposium will confront three pivotal issues in contemporary human rights: memory and transitional justice; indigenous and environmental rights and race and human rights. On March 7th, cultural critics Rebecca Atencio (Tulane University) and Idelber Avelar (Tulane University), internationally renowned Afro-Brazilian writer Ana Maria Gonçalves, and Brazilian scholar and filmmaker Charles Bicalho will address the aforementioned issues vis-á-vis human rights. On March 7th in the evening Dr. Charles Bicalho will screen Kotkuphi (2011) and Xupapoynãg (2011). On March 8th, selected graduate student papers will be read on a variety of issues that confront themes of human rights.
Sponsors: UNM Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Division of Student Affairs, El Centro de la Raza, Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, University Libraries' Inter-American Studies Program, and the LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please visit the UNM University Libraries website or see the event flyer.
Mar 8

Campus Workshop: Biodiversity & Indigenous Peoples

Time: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Law School Room #2404
Description: Please join us for a capacity-building forum and workshop on the Convention of Biodiversity, the Protocol of Nagoya, and the protection of traditional knowledge associated with biodiversity. This is a three-day workshop that will be held on March 8,9, and 10. The participants will learn about the Convention on Biodiversity, the Protocol of Nagoya, and their relation [and protection of] to Traditional Knowledge associated to genetic resources. The Position with respect to the Protocol of Nagoya and the reference to Indigenous Peoples will be drafted and sent to the Secretariat of the Convention on Biodiversity. This Positioning paper will also be sent the International Forum on Indigenous Peoples on Biodiversity to be completed for the discussions that will take place in South Korea in 2014. The information will be disseminated in English and Spanish to inform Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities on the implications of the Protocol of Nagoya and the effects it could have on the resources of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities. An emphasis will be placed on understanding and developing capacity building to create and define Community Protocols.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This workshop is free, but registration is required. Please visit El Centro for registration and more information. For quick reference, please the event flyer.
Mar 19

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Steven Maloney, United States Foreign Service

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker series presents Ambassador Steven Maloney to speak with students about the United States Foreign Service. Steve Maloney joined the Foreign Service in January 1981. Mr. Maloney earned his B.A. at the University of Maryland in 1974 and received his M.S. in National Resource Strategy from the National Defense University in 2001. He has served overseas at the U.S. Embassies in Bucharest, Amman and Tel Aviv and has had a variety of postings at the State Department in Washington.
Among his other assignments, Mr. Maloney was Consul General in Amman, Jordan and Director of Consular Training at the Foreign Service Institute in Arlington, Virginia. From 2006-2009, he served as a senior officer in Hong Kong and most recently worked as a Senior Career Development Officer (Human Resources) at the State Department in Washington. From 2011 to August 2012, Steve served as Consul General at the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan. He has been a career member of the Senior Foreign Service since 2004.
Mr. Maloney's foreign languages are German, Arabic, Hebrew and Romanian. He and his wife Diane make their home in Bethesda, Maryland. They have two grown sons, both recent college graduates who are living and working in California and Colorado, respectively. Steve and his wife are excited to be living and working in New Mexico and Steve looks forward to a great experience at UNM. He is also responsible for visiting campuses and engaging students on other campuses throughout the Rocky Mountains region.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.
Mar 19

Lecture: Joseph Gilbert: In from the Cold: Latin America's New Encounter with the Long Cold War

Time: 2:15 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Location: 1104 Mesa Vista Hall, History Department Commons Room
Description: Join the UNM Department of History and the LAII as they welcome Professor Gilbert Joseph, Farnham Professor of History and International Studies at Yale University, for a presentation titled "In from the Cold: Latin America's New Encounter with the Long Cold War." Professor Joseph's interest in the topic stem both from his scholarship and from his personal conviction. In the 1980s he participated or led several interfaith delegations to Nicaragua, one of which gave rise to "Witness for Peace."
He has served on the board of historical journals in Mexico, Venezuela, the United Kingdom, and the United States, and was editor, alongside Stuart Schwartz, of the Hispanic American Historical Review from 1997 to 2002. Recent essay collections for which he served as editor include The Mexico Reader: History, Culture, Politics (Duke, 2002); In from the Cold: Latin America's New Encounter with the Cold War (Duke, 2008); and A Century of Revolution: Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America's Long Cold War (Duke, 2010). He currently co-edits with Emily Rosenberg the academic monograph series "American Encounters: Global Interactions" for Duke University Press, with more than 50 titles to date.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of History
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 19

K-12 Educators Workshop: Stitching Resistance: Bringing an Art Form to Life in the Classroom

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: The National Hispanic Cultural Center and the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute are coming together once again to provide another in-depth and profound look at Latin America history, art and experience via special events tailored for New Mexico teachers. This pair of workshops will focus on demonstrations and resources designed to bring the history of Chile and the arpillera art form alive in classrooms! Teachers from grades 4-12 will benefit most from this content, though all are welcome to attend.
Nearly 40 years ago, the armed forces of Chile overthrew the administration of Salvador Allende. That day, September 11, 1973, created the necessary conditions for the art form known as arpilleras. These textiles became the most visual (and visible), poignant, and widespread manifestation of opposition to authoritarianism, violation of human rights and the disappearance of loved ones associated with the military government that ruled Chile until 1990.
This workshop will expand on the themes explored in the previous one, but with an emphasis on hands-on activities. Participants will have the opportunity to create their own arpilleras in the workshop, and activity kits will be provided so that they can then share the same experience with their students. Tapas and refreshments from the La Fonda del Bosque Restaurant will be provided.
Sponsors: National Hispanic Cultural Center, LAII
Notes: This workshop is free, but teachers are asked to register in advance given limited space and materials. Please contact the LAII at kphilipp@unm.edu or (505) 277-7047. All educator participants will receive a certificate of professional development. Refreshments and copies of the curriculum materials will be provided. Please see the event flyer for reference.
Mar 20

LAII Lecture Series: Frederick M. Nunn - Threads of History or, The Chile of the Arpilleras: Studies in Imagination, Perspectives, and Intrigue

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Dr. Frederick M. Nunn, Professor Emeritus of History and International Studies, Portland State University. Times of stress or crisis produce vivid and dramatic examples of the perpetual relationship between history and politics, and the creative arts. So it was in late twentieth-century Chile when "received" historical and political beliefs proved false, at best misleading. In 1973, Latin America's most professional armed forces and police deposed a democratically elected president, held power for seventeen years, ruling harshly all the while. Chileans in opposition to the regime produced art literature, music, poetry, and theater. They not only expressed their realization about assumptions regarding Chile's past and its institutions, they demanded change. In no genre is this more clearly expressed in than that of the arpilleras. "Threads of History" explores "the Chile of the Arpilleras," the context in which appliqué became the medium of expression for the Chileans' appreciation of their past and present, and perhaps their future.
Sponsors: LAII, Global Education Office
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 20

Lecture: Joseph Gilbert: Historical Editing: Academic Journals, Academic Essay Collections, Academic Book Series

Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Location: 1104 Mesa Vista Hall, History Department Commons Room
Description: Join the UNM Department of History and the LAII as they welcome Professor Gilbert Joseph, Farnham Professor of History and International Studies at Yale University, for a presentation titled "Historical Editing: Academic Journals, Academic Essay Collections, Academic Book Series." Professor Joseph has served on the board of historical journals in Mexico, Venezuela, the United Kingdom, and the United States, and was editor, alongside Stuart Schwartz, of the Hispanic American Historical Review from 1997 to 2002. Recent essay collections for which he served as editor include The Mexico Reader: History, Culture, Politics (Duke, 2002); In from the Cold: Latin America's New Encounter with the Cold War (Duke, 2008); and A Century of Revolution: Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America's Long Cold War (Duke, 2010). He currently co-edits with Emily Rosenberg the academic monograph series "American Encounters: Global Interactions" for Duke University Press, with more than 50 titles to date.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of History
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 21

LAII Lecture Series: Ramón Arzápalo: The Colonial Maya Texts: Recent Contributions to the Theory of Semiotic Translation

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Please join us for a special presentation by Dr. Ramón Arzápalo Marín, a LAII Visiting Scholar from the Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
This presentation will draw upon the research that Dr. Arzápalo has done while here at UNM. He will discuss how "Maya civilization is characterized by the development of a complex writing system that allowed members of this high culture to record their scientific, artistic and especially their historical texts. For a thorough understanding of their messages it is necessary to become acquainted with the script that they used for books, murals, and stellae. We provide an overview of the structure and development of the hieroglyphs or written signs relied on by the Maya for these records until the arrival of the Spaniards.
We offer a critical analysis of the nature of this script based on recent, extensive research on documents of the Colonial period. The analysis of an encoded text taken from The Book of Chilam Balam of Chumayel is key to laying the foundation for a solid methodology for interpreting pre-Columbian texts written by the Maya. However, in order to correctly interpret the messages indicated by the analytical components, it is important to also consider such pragmatic information as their place in history and the surrounding social interrelations. The heuristic of our analysis should clarify some intercultural phenomena, usually overlooked since the 16th century, that have damaged interethnic relations."
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 26

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Emmanuel Ortega, Illustrated Testimonials: Images of Novohispanic Franciscan Martyrs in 18th Century New Mexico

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker series presents Emmanuel Ortega, Art History Instructor at University of Nevada - Las Vegas. The pictorial history of Franciscan martyrs is one that belongs to an ongoing process of spiritual conquest which began during the early Christian era. The visual techniques employed by missionary members during the Spanish colonial period in the Americas are some that derive essentially from medieval concepts of vision and spiritual devotion. These included representations of violence that were carried, as mentioned by Anthony McCosker, by "a highly affective visual content."
In the particular case of New Mexican missions, such concepts were applied in order to create a Bourbon visual landscape of devotion. While many medieval affective visual techniques were applied to the Novohispanic Franciscan martyr canvasses, colonial approaches to the image of the so called "savage" in the edges of empire were to result in a unique genre of painting. One of the main details these images sought to establish was he will of missionary members to die at the service of any given imperial power.
Such will was exploited by medieval and Novohispanic religious orders through a constant exploration of unknown and newly conquered territories. The images of martyrs thus provided the perfect opportunity to narrate a monk's experience as a spiritual conqueror in estranged lands such as New Mexico in the mid 17th and late 18th centuries. Mendicant orders were in charge of the dissemination of these paintings, and in order for the images to serve their roles as what I call "illustrated testimonials," their principal display grounds were mostly concentrated in monastic spaces of learning and/or prayer.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Mar 26

K-12 Educators Workshop: In the Wake of Juárez: Teaching Politics Through Art

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Art Museum
Description: Join the UNM Art Museum and the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute for a free, art-based professional development workshop for educators. Participants will first engage with the subject and technique of the museum's exhibition, "In the Wake of Juárez: The Drawings of Alice Leora Briggs," and then discuss how to implement it in the classroom. This event is recommended only for teachers of grades 9-12 given the content of the artwork.
In the first half of the workshop, UNM Art Museum Curator of Academic Initiatves, Sara Otto-Diniz, will lead a guided discussion of the art in the exhibit and offer a hands-on experience of working in sgraffito (the artist's method). In the second half, LAII staff members will review the socio-cultural context of Ciudad Juárez and provide Common Core-based curriculum strategies that will allow participants to explore the topic in more depth with their students.
The exhibit of Alice Leora Briggs will form the basis for this workshop. With expressionist bravado and technical cool, Briggs' remarkable sgraffito (literally "scratch") drawings capture the Inferno that the city has become. Freely appropriating Renaissance prints and paintings of the Last Judgment, the Crucifixion and other martyrdoms, public executions, tortures, and wars by artists from Holbein to van der Weyden, and immersing herself in literature of Dante and Cormac McCarthy, Briggs merges old world fears with present-day realities to create a disturbing yet compelling picture of the human condition For more information on the artist, please visit the artist's website.
Sponsors: UNM Art Museum, LAII
Notes: This workshop is free, but teachers are asked to register in advance given limited space and materials. Please contact the LAII at kphilipp@unm.edu or (505) 277-7047. YOU MUST RSVP BY MARCH 20, 2013. All educator participants will receive a certificate of professional development. Refreshments and copies of the curriculum materials will be provided. Please see the event flyer for reference.
Mar 27

LAII Lecture Series: Jessica Budds: Extracting Minerals, Producing Waterscapes: Rethinking the Relationship Between Mining and Water in Peru

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Please join us for a special presentation with Dr. Jessica Budds, Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in Environment and Development at the University of East Anglia in the UK. With a background in Hispanic studies and human geography, she works on political ecologies of water and development in Latin America, with an interest in how power relations shape instances of water (water flows, patterns of access, infrastructure, policies and discourses), and how water counter-shapes social relations and forms of governance, thus configuring 'waterscapes' in particular ways.
In this talk, Budds draws on work undertaken as part of a UK Economic and Social Research Council project to explore the relationship between the expansion of mining and growing demand for water resources in the Andes. While previous research has centred on the contamination and depletion of water resources by mining, Budds argues that the expansion of mineral extraction has both wider and deeper implications for water resources, and, moreover, that the nature of water issues has reshaped practices and debates around mining. In this presentation, she builds on emerging scholarship within political ecology that repositions water from a material resource to a 'socio-nature' that embeds and reflects power relations, both material and discursive. She supports this perspective with field data from Peru, in order to show how the mining sector's thirst for water influences social relations, technologies, institutions, and discourses, which operate over varying spatial and temporal scales, and often beyond the watershed. The concept of the waterscape, she contends, is well suited to examine these multiple ways in which water becomes produced through mineral extraction.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of Geography
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. Please see the event flyer for reference.
Mar 28

LAII Lecture Series: Samuel Roll - Providing Psychoanalytic Training and Psychoanalytic Treatment to a Large Mexican Community

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII for a special presentation with Dr. Samuel Roll, Professor Emeritus, Department of Psychology, for a discussion of the Instituto de Salud Mental in Monterrey, Mexico. The need: Mexico trains a large number of persons with university degrees in psychology but no avenue for advanced training. A large number of children in Mexico are in need of psychotherapy but well-trained therapists are limited in number and expensive. The Limitations: Limited economics resources; limited number of professionals with advanced training; lack of a model that is psychologically sophisticated and culturally relevant. The Resources: A culture of support for education and educational innovation; large number of professionals with intense desire for advanced training; flexible political structures; cultural values that support analytic thinking; a devoted core of international educators; one determined woman. The Obstacles: Too many to list. The Outcome: Instituto de Salud Mental in Monterrey Mexico.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 1

LAII Informal Presentation & Conversation: Rich Wood - Francis I: First Latin American Pope

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII for an informal presentation and group discussion about Francis I, led by professor Rich Wood, Department of Sociology. Cardinal Bergoglio, who has taken the name of Pope Francis I, is the first Jesuit pope and the first pope from South America. In this informal event, Professor Wood will explore the implications of his election and discuss what it might mean for church and society in Latin America.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 1

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In April we're reading Journey of Dreams by Marge Pellegrino.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public; no registration required. For more information, visit the Vamos a Leer blog or see the event flyer.
Apr 2

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Fernando Rivera and Beatriz Yuste: Fundación Altiplano: Sustainable Economic Development Initiatives in Northern Chile

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker series presents Fernando Rivera and Bea Yuste, who will together discuss the nonprofit organization Fundación Altiplano, an integral project of sustainable development carried out in the northern Chilean region Arica y Parinacota. The organization's mission involves "promoting sustainable development among rural and Andean communities through the strengthening of cultural traditions." It carries this out through the restoration, historical and anthropological evaluation of the Andean churches in the region; involvement with the tourist-patrimonial circuit in the Andean foothills; and, the diffusion of audiovisual projects. For more information about Fundación Altiplano, visit the organization's website.
The project is co-presented by Beatriz Yuste, a Spanish architecture, and Fernando Rivera, a Chilean producer, both of whom have worked with the organization in Chile. Yuste and Rivera will explain the organization itself and discuss their work in the field. Then, Yuste and Rivera will touch upon the community-based work they currently do in Santa Fe, drawing connections between the Santa Fe organization Cornerstone and Fundación Altiplano. The presentation will explore parallels between the two organizations, finding similarities in the way that communities in the Southwestern US and northern Chile independently struggle with historic preservation and cultural management.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 3
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Apr 6

60th Annual Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies (RMCLAS) Conference

Time: All Day
Location: Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, NM, 87501
Description: The Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies (RMCLAS) is the oldest Latin American academic organization in the world. Formation of the organization began in 1953 at the University of New Mexico (UNM) and the first annual meeting was held in 1954. This year RMCLAS celebrates a landmark year with its 60th Annual Conference of the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies. The RMCLAS Annual Conference provides an opportunity for scholars and graduate students to share original research on Latin America.
Sponsors: RMCLAS, LAII, others
Notes: For more information, please see the RMCLAS website.
Apr 4

Author Reading and Presentation: Jesús Vázquez Mendoza, Ráfagas

Time: 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join author Jesús Vázquez Mendoza for a special author reading, book-signing, and discussion of his forthcoming book, Ráfagas. From Amazon, "Ráfagas es un libro producto de muchos años de búsqueda por los caminos de la escritura y la fotografía; en él, se recopilan textos realizados por el autor hace ya algún tiempo y en ese sentido constituye un trabajo de recuperación, una obligada puesta al día con el oficio. Asimismo, apoyándose en el contenido visual, Ráfagas emprende una travesía cuyas escalas arriban a espacios heterogéneos: las calles de París, la legendaria Ruta 66 norteamericana, el territorio fronterizo entre México y los Estados Unidos. Y es a partir de la confluencia entre palabra e imagen que Ráfagas explora sus posibilidades de significación, a la vez que asume una actitud crítica respecto a la violencia imperante en la zona de la cual proviene: Ciudad Juárez. No obstante, su temática es diversa y se halla lejos de centrarse únicamente en esa dolorosa realidad fronteriza, ya que en esta colección también encuentran lugar el erotismo, la nostalgia, la cotidianidad urbana, el autoexilio y el lenguaje como asunto mismo de la escritura. Este último punto explica, al menos en parte, el empleo del neologismo, el juego textual y el sarcasmo como estrategias discursivas capaces de apropiarse de los motivos tradicionales de la poesía."
Jesús Vázquez-Mendoza has a Ph.D. from the University of Kansas in Spanish & Spanish American Literature. During the last 25 years, his professional use of Spanish has taken him to live in cities like Chicago, Houston, Kansas City and Albuquerque. Most recently, Dr. Vazquez's career has span 12 years in television and radio broadcasting with the Hispanic Broadcasting Corporation, Univision Radio and Telemundo by hosting regional talk shows in technology, and commentating on important cultural highlights. Throughout his career, he has also been an editor of a newspaper, reporter, and internet website manager producing virtual communities for Hispanics in the United States (Barnes & Noble ).
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, and LAII
Notes: The presentation will be primarily in Spanish; no interpretation provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 4

Lecture: Dr. Alejandro Lugo: Border Landscapes: The Outsider Within and the Occupied Borderlands

Time: 3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: Hibben Center, Rm 105
Description: Dr. Lugo is Professor of Anthropology and Latina/o Studies at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. His book Fragmented Lives Assembled Parts: Culture, Capitalism, and Conquest at the US-Mexico Border (University of Texas Press 2008) received two national book prizes, including the Southwest Book Prize and the Association of Latina/o Anthropologists Book Prize. His ethnographic photographs have been exhibited in several museums including two works selected for the permanent collection by the National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago, IL.
Sponsors: Department of Anthropology, Ortiz Center, American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, and the LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Apr 9

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Scott Crago, Guitarreros Caminantes and Rural Reform: Plan Perquenco and Mapuche Cultural Revival Under Chilean Authoritarianism, 1973-1990

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker series presents Scott Crago, PhD student in the Department of History and recipient of a 2012 LAII/Tinker Field Research Grant.
Through a focus on a pilot project for indigenous Mapuche integration known as Plan Perquenco, this presentation examines the intersections between ethnicity, gender, state building and Mapuche collective memory under Chilean authoritarianism in the 1970s and '80s. His study of Plan Perquenco demonstrates that while neoliberal reforms under the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet required a fundamental transformation of Mapuche familial, cultural, and political organization, administrative decentralization permitted Mapuche a means to manipulate these rural reform programs to the benefit of their communities.
Under Plan Perquenco, Mapuche used mandatory monthly meetings overseen by young agricultural technicians less than sympathetic to the military regime to come together and share collective memories of loss and devastation suffered under the dictatorship. In these meetings, Mapuche utilized both their oral tradition and Chilean folk music to reconstruct a history that reinforced their sense of collective community belonging and cultural identity that challenged the ideals of masculinity and femininity espoused by the military regime.
Mapuche, therefore, remember Plan Perquenco as a time when they began to recover historical memory and community organization through new modes of cultural production like Chilean folk music.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 10
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Apr 11

A Richard E. Greenleaf Symposium on Latin America: Authority and Identity in Colonial Ibero-America

Time: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building (SUB) Lobo A & B
Description: Please join the Latin American & Iberian Institute "A Richard E. Greenleaf Symposium on Latin America: Authority and Identity in the Colonial Ibero-America World," a two-day interdisciplinary conference that will be held April 10-11, 2013.
This symposium brings to UNM eight prominent colonial scholars from History, Art History, and Literary and Cultural Studies for an interdisciplinary dialogue. Their talks examine the meanings that indigenous, European, and Creole peoples produced in their festivals, rituals, codices and chronicles, legal dictates and practices, their bodies, and the very space they built and inhabited. With a constant focus on authority, presenters will discuss the complexity of colonial subjects' interactions with each other and the particularly colonial identities that emerged from these interactions. Panel titles are "Documenting & Structuring Knowledge outside of European Forms," "Contesting and Redefining Imperial Subjectivities," "Disciplining and Reinscribing the Body," and "Shaping and Performing Urban Space." Afternoon sessions will be followed by an opportunity for extended dialogue with the panelists.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This symposium is free and open to the public; no registration required. For reference, please see the event flyer and agenda. Additional details are available on the symposium webpage.
Apr 12

Film Screening: MY VILLAGE, MY LOBSTER

Time: 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building (SUB) Theater
Description: Please join us for a FREE screening of the acclaimed documentary "MY VILLAGE, MY LOBSTER," the powerful and shocking story of the indigenous Miskito lobster divers along Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast who risk their lives diving for the region's most lucrative resource - the Caribbean spiny lobster. Over the past 20 years, hundreds of Miskito divers have died and thousands of have become paralyzed from decompression sickness, a diving-related condition commonly known as the bends. Through the voices of Miskito lobster divers and their families, as well as boat owners, captains, and doctors, MY VILLAGE, MY LOBSTER tells the story of an industry and a community in crisis.
A Q & A with the Director/Producer, Brad Allgood, will follow the screening.
Sponsors: LAII, Department of Economics, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at UNM, Nourish International, and Peace Corps
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Click to see the poster for the film screening event.
Apr 16

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Joseph Sorrentino, Aquí y Allá

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Joseph Sorrentino began documenting the lives of farmworkers in western New York in 2002. The vast majority of farmworkers in this area-and in the US-are from Mexico and it's generally agreed that well over half of them are here illegally. After seeing the difficult conditions under which they live and work here, he decided to travel to remote villages in southern Mexico in 2003 to see first-hand the conditions that were driving them to make the dangerous journey across the border. His trip took him to the coffee-growing regions in the Sierra Juarez in Oaxaca and to Cuetzalan, Puebla where he found extreme poverty. He has since made three more trips to rural Mexico (the most recent being January and February, 2012) while continuing to document conditions for farmworkers in New York. In Aquí y Allá, he tries to show how Mexico's agricultural policies and trade agreements with the US have increased poverty in rural Mexico, forcing people off their lands to search for work in the US. He also tries to show how necessary Mexican farmworkers are to the US.
His articles and photographs have appeared in a number of publications including City Paper (Philadelphia), City Paper (Rochester, NY), Rochester Magazine, Philadelphia Inquirer Magazine, La Jornada del Campo (Mexico City) and Commonweal Magazine. He has had close to 40 solo photography exhibits, including several in Mexico. His photographs will appear in La Hora del Café, Dos Siglos de Café Mexicano, which will be published by Instituto Maya later this year.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 19

LAII Lecture Series: Mary Alice Scott - El enfermo se me muere: An Ethnographic Analysis of Fragmented Neoliberalization in Mexico's Health Care Reform

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a presentation with Dr. Mary Alice Scott, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at New Mexico State University. Dr. Scott's presentation will address the following: In the year 2000, the Mexican government introduced the public health program Social Protection in Health, aiming to attain 100% health insurance coverage for the Mexican population. Official program evaluations to date have focused on quantitative measures of health outcomes, but little qualitative research on the experiences of patients has been conducted in the evaluation process. This presentation uses data collected in an ethnographic study of 72 women in an agricultural community in southern Veracruz to analyze the experiences of women who participate in Social Protection in Health through its health insurance program known as Seguro Popular. Although recent research demonstrates national improvement in some health outcomes following program implementation, women in the ethnographic study often claimed that health care through the program was inadequate and did not serve their health needs. I argue that the disconnect between improved national health outcomes and women's experiences of care is in part due to the fragmented and partial neoliberalization of health care programs and discourses that both patients and personnel adopt and that supports changes in public health clinic infrastructure and care delivery.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Apr 23

K-12 Event: Poesía eres tú

Time: 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: In 2013, the LAII and the Spanish Resource Center will partner for the 13th edition of this elementary school student poetry contest. Elementary school kids (from first to fifth grade) will recite a poem in Spanish in the most artistic and beautiful way in front of a crowd of over 300 people.
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, and LAII
Notes: This event is free to observe, but registration must be confirmed in advance by writing to kphilipp@unm.edu.
Apr 23

K-12 Event: Cuentistas

Time: 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: 2013 marks the 13th year of the Spanish Resource Center's annual Spanish literary contest, Cuentistas, for high school students. This contest, honoring the Día del Libro, April 23rd, is made possible by the New Mexico / Spain educational partnership. This year's topic will be free and the only requirement is that students are encouraged to further their writing skills and their knowledge of Spanish language by writing in Spanish a short story (fiction or non-fiction).
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, and LAII
Notes: This event is free to observe, but registration must be confirmed in advance by writing to kphilipp@unm.edu.
Apr 30

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Luke Smith - Farrapos' politics in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: The SOLAS Brown Bag Speaker series presents Luke Smith, UNM graduate student in the Department of History and recipient of a 2012 LAII/Tinker Field Research Grant.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.
May 6

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In May we're reading Under the Mesquite by Guadalupe García McCall.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public; no registration required. For more information, visit the Vamos a Leer blog or see the event flyer.
May 9

K-12 Educator's Workshop: El programa bilingüe de Albuquerque High School / Albuquerque High School's Bilingual Program

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, Spanish Resource Center, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join us for a professional development workshop led by Michelle Jurado, director of Albuquerque High School's bilingual program.
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, LAII
Notes: Attendance is free, but please confirm in advance by emailing the Spanish Resource Center at cer.albuquerque@mecd.es
May 10

Latin American Studies Convocation

Time: 2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Hibben Center, Atrium
Description: The Latin American Studies (LAS) program will hold its Spring 2013 Convocation, honoring those undergraduate and graduate students who will receive LAS degrees in May and August. The keynote speaker will be LAS alum Melina Salvador, program manager and medical anthropologist at the UNM Center for Rural and Community Behavioral Health.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: Light refreshments will be provided.
May 16

K-12 Educator's Workshop: El español de herencia / Spanish heritage speakers

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, Spanish Resource Center, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join us for a professional development featuring Damián Vergara Wilson, assistant professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and coordinator of UNM's Spanish as a Heritage Language program.
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, LAII
Notes: Attendance is free, but please confirm in advance by emailing the Spanish Resource Center at cer.albuquerque@mecd.es
May 30
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Jun 2

¡Cine Magnífico! Albuquerque's Latino Film Festival

Time: Varies
Location: Varies
Description: Join the LAII and Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque as they celebrate the inaugural year for ¡Cine Magnífico!, New Mexico's only film festival presenting the voice and vision of Latin@ cinema. The festival exhibits contemporary documentaries, short films, and feature films about Spain, Portugal, Latin America, and Latinos in the U.S. In doing so it promotes intercultural awareness and celebrates the diversity of Ibero-American cultures throughout the world.
Sponsors: LAII, Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, and supporting community members.
Notes: This is a ticketed event. For more information, please visit the film festival website.
Jun 3

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. During the summer months (June and July), the book group has transitioned to reading similarly-themed adult literature. In June we're reading It All Begins and Ends at the Kentucky Club by Benjamin Alire Sáenz.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, "Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America and Literacy.
Jun 10

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar: Rady Roldán-Figueroa - Spanish Accounts of Christian Martyrdom in Tokugawa Japan, c. 1597-c. 1945: Ideational Representations and their Circulation in Spain, the Philippines, and New Spain

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Waters Room, Zimmerman Library
Description:

Join the LAII and University Libraries for a summative research presentation by Rady Roldá-Figueroa, a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar.

This project traces the literary representation of Christian martyrdom in 17th century Japan as it was articulated, disseminated, and published in Spain and its colonial territories, specially the Philippines and New Spain. The Christian Century of Japan (1548- c.1650) coincided with the eventual unification of the country under the Tokugawa dynasty, which defined the Edo period of Japan's history (1603-1867). Until 1614, Christianity flourished throughout the realm. Jesuits were for long the exclusive Christian missionary agents in the country since the arrival of Francis Xavier (1506-1552) at the port of Kagoshima in 1549. They were joined in the last decade of the sixteenth century by Spanish mendicants travelling from Manila. In 1614, Tokugawa Ieyasu proscribed Christianity and ordered the expulsion of European religious personnel. Consequently, an unprecedented persecution against Christians was unleashed throughout the country. In response, the missionary orders produced a unique body of religious literature, in the form of hagiographical and martyrological works, centered on the fate of European missionaries and their Japanese converts. The literature was also meant to advance the interests of the missionary orders in the Spanish court, as well as in peripheral centers of power within the Spanish empire. Religious orders not only had to earn the support of Madrid but also the patronage of political and commercial elites in Mexico City and Manila.

In this context, print proved a fruitful means of advancing the interests of each religion, and the accounts of martyrs proved to be a moving topic. Interestingly, this body of religious literature engendered a secondary corpus made up of devotional works produced well beyond the seventeenth century and even beyond the colonial period of New Spain. The presentation will focus on rare printed items found in the special collection of the Center for Southwest Research that illuminate this interesting chapter of religious ideational history.

Rady Roldán-Figueroa (Th.D., Boston University) is Assistant Professor of the History of Christianity at Boston University School of Theology. He is the author of The Ascetic Spirituality of Juan de Ávila (1499-1569) (Brill, 2010), and co-editor of Exploring Christian Heritage - A Reader in History and Theology (Baylor University Press, 2012). His articles have appeared in the Sixteenth Century Journal, Archiv für Reformationgeschichte/Archive for Reformation History, The Seventeenth Century, and History of European Ideas, among others.

Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Jun 10
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Jun 15

26th Annual Festival Flamenco Internacional de Albuquerque

Time: Varies
Location: Varies
Description: Each June, the National Institute of Flamenco hosts Festival Flamenco Internacional de Albuquerque, bringing the finest flamenco artists in the world to Albuquerque. For seven days, the city is filled with the pulse of flamenco, and is transformed into a cultural epicenter for the art form. This tradition celebrates flamenco, the ancient form of artistic expression of the Spanish-Gypsy culture. The lure of flamenco is its ability to explore the full range of human emotion with an intense, vibrant quality that leaves audiences and students alike, captivated.
Sponsors: UNM (including LAII), among many others.
Notes: This is a ticketed event. For more information, please visit the festival website.
Jun 26

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar: Theresa Avila - Rebellion in the Archive: The Mexican Revolution in the University of New Mexico's Latin American Collections

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Zimmerman Library, Waters Room
Description:

Join the LAII And University Libraries for a summative research presentation with Theresa Avila, a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar.

The Mexican Revolution occurred between 1910 and 1920. The legacy of the war, however, is an ongoing concept that has evolved over one hundred years, which frames and informs present day politics, struggles, and art in Mexico and beyond. The Revolution manifests in various forms, one being the archive. Due to its impressive and vast collections, the University of New Mexico is a key site for research of the history of Mexico. This project is the result of a focused investigation seeking visual material from the UNM Latin American Library Collections that stems from or is related to the Mexican Revolution. Material examined includes caricatures, photographs, graphic prints, posters, excerpts from news journals and publications, bulletins, and book covers.

Who participated in the Mexican Revolution? What did life during the war look like? How was the rebellion remembered and constructed? What formats were engaged to invoke and disseminate information and narratives about the revolt, the ideas of revolutionaries, and to establish the pantheon of revolutionary leadership? How does post-war Mexico and Mexicans connect to their revolutionary past? This presentation addresses these questions and more. Themes and topics of particular focus are the social and political conditions in Mexico particularly related to the outbreak of the war, civil liberties and human rights, labor laws, access to education, the control of natural resources, the Mexican Revolution and the actors involved, nation building after the war, and the legacy of the insurgency.

Theresa Avila is an independent scholar and curator with a Ph.D. in Art History from the University of New Mexico. She specializes in the history, theory, and criticism of modern and contemporary Latin American Art with a concentration in Modern Mexican Art. Recent projects and publications include co-editor for a forthcoming Special Issue of Third Text (2014) entitled "Art and The Legacies of the Mexican Revolution," her dissertation entitled Chronicles of Revolution and Nation: El Taller de Gráfica Popular's "Las Estampas de la Revolución Mexicana" (2013), and "Zapata: Figure, Image, Symbol" (2007) as part of The University of New Mexico Latin American and Iberian Institute's Research Paper Series.

Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For more information, please see the event flyer.
Jul 1

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. During the summer months (June and July), the book group has transitioned to reading similarly-themed adult literature. In July we're reading The Queen of America by Luis Alberto Urrea.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, "Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America and Literacy.
Aug 5

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In August we're reading Gringolandia by Lyn Miller-Lachmann.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America and Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2013-2014 Selected Titles.
Aug 28

LAII Lecture Series: Evan W. Carson - The Art of the Possible: Partnerships in Conserving Desert Biodiversity in Mexico

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Dr. Evan W. Carson, Research Assistant Professor in the Biology Department and a faculty affiliate with the Latin American and Iberian Institute (LAII) at UNM. He has a great and longstanding interest in population genetics and desert fishes of Mexico. The main objective of his research program is to supply conservation organizations and managers with population genetic information to guide conservation management of imperiled desert fishes and their habitats. This work is conducted primarily through collaboration with colleagues at Pronatura Noreste, A. C., and the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL) in Mexico.
The Chihuahuan Desert is notable for unusually high levels of biodiversity and endemism within an arid landscape. This biota is particularly diverse in Mexico where it is also highly imperiled due to widespread, unsustainable exploitation of natural resources. Loss of desert biodiversity is driven by landscape-scale effects that present a vexing problem for conservation: How can limited resources for protection be used most effectively when i) ecosystem deterioration is a regional phenomenon; ii) individual species are distributed locally; and iii) wide chasms often separate the priorities of stakeholders? One approach for which early results are promising involves a locally applied, landscape extensible model being tested in Chihuahua, northern Mexico. This bottom-up strategy focuses on development of a flexible conservation model that emphasizes partnership with and common ground between conservationists and local landowners. Success of this model hinges on sustainable development of natural resources, such that durable conservation agreements can be negotiated and long-term security for landowners can be achieved. The framework of this model, case examples, and the importance of local, national, and international education programs will be discussed.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Aug 28

SOLAS Brown Bag Lecture Series: Christos Galanis and Kathryn Peters, FRG recipients

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us at the Latin American and Iberian Institute for our first Brown Bag Event of the Year.
Christos Galanis has just completed his M.F.A. in the University of New Mexico's Studio Art Department with a specialization in Art & Ecology. As a recipient of the Tinker / Latin American and Iberian Institute Field Research Grant, he spent May and June 2013 in Spain, conducting a research/art project that was primarily realized through a 150-mile memorial walk from the French border to Barcelona. His work focuses on the cultivation and consideration of walking as a vehicle for research, representing an embodied, non-rational form of knowledge production that spans the evolutionary trajectory of our species.
His route re-traced, in reverse, the steps of hundreds of thousands of Republican Spaniards who fled toFrance on foot for fear of reprisals by the forces ofGeneral Franco's fascist army at the conclusion of the Spanish Civil War (1936-39). Galanis' presentation will reveal the many nuances, synchronicities, and contradictions he encountered along the way, through which he will present the argument that the particular knowledge and understanding produced from the walk could only have been undertaken through this particular research method. Further, his project reaffirms the "long walk" as a vehicle for performance art, in the lineage of artists such as Marina Abramovic, Richard Long, and Francis Alÿs.
Kathryn Peters is a dual degree M.A. Latin American Studies/Community and Regional Planning student at the University of New Mexico. Kathryn received a field research grant in 2012 to conduct research in the remote village of Pindoyú, Paraguay. Kathryn received a field research grant in 2012 to conduct research in the remote village of Pindoyú, Paraguay.
The community of Pindoyú has historically practiced subsistence agriculture with little interaction with the global economy. However, macro-level policy reform beginning in the 1970s caused international trade, principally agricultural export, to become a priority in the formerly insular Paraguayan countryside. Additionally, a highway located within 5 km of Pindoyú was paved during the mid 1990s, exposing the community to increased migration and trade. Currently, residents of Pindoyú participate in elements of a local, communal economic system while simultaneously playing a role of the global capitalist economy.
Three years after serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in Pindoyú, Kathyrn returned to the 500 inhabitant village to conduct research for her master's thesis. To document the changes in inter-personal relationships and the population's contemporary economic perspective of the land, Kathryn interviewed families and arranged auto-ethnography activities with 2nd-12th graders. The recorded narratives reveal varying perceptions surrounding these cultural shifts, including forms of both adaptation and resistance.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Sept 5

Presentation & Discussion: Michael A. Hammer

Time: 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: History Common Room (1st floor Mesa Vista Hall)
Description: Join us for a special presentation and discussion with Ambassador Mike Hammer, who is currently the Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs and who has held numerous diplomatic posts around the world. Ambassador Hammer has also served at the White House as special assistant to the President, Senior Director for Press and Communications, and the National Security Council Spokesman from January 2009-January 2011. While at the National Security Council, he also served as the Director of Andean Affairs. Mike Hammer is a career member of the U.S. Senior Foreign Service, entering the diplomatic corps in 1988. He has served abroad in Bolivia, Norway, Iceland and Denmark. The Ambassador grew up in Latin America, living in Honduras, El Salvador, Colombia, Venezuela, and Brazil. He is fluent in Spanish, and speaks French and Icelandic.
Sponsors: Office of Vice President for Student Affairs, Global Education Office, Latin American and Iberian Institute, International Studies Institute, National Security Studies Program, and Departments of History and Political Sciences
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Sept 7

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Día de los Muertos - Ofrendas, Papel Picado & Alfeñiques

Time: 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center - Domenici Education Building (1701 4th St. SW)
Description: Join the National Hispanic Cultural Center and the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute (LAII) as we explore the history of Día de los Muertos and consider the related practices of creating ofrendas, papel picado, and alfeñiques.
This is a free professional development workshop for K-12 educators. Participants will learn how to integrate Día de los Muertos into their classrooms with this hands-on, art-based workshop. Certificates of professional development and copies of relevant curriculum materials will be provided.
Sponsors: National Hispanic Cultural Center, LAII
Notes: Given limited space and resources, all educators are asked to pre-register by contact Erica Garcia (erica.garcia@state.nm.us) at the NHCC. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Sept 9

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In September we're reading Summer of the Mariposas by Guadalupe Garcia McCall.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America and Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2013-2014 Selected Titles.
Sept 10

LAII Lecture Series: Jorge Colón - Rio 2014-2016: Beyond Olympic Mode

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Jorge Colón, Assistant Professor in the School of Architecture + Planning and a faculty affiliate with the Latin American and Iberian Institute (LAII) at UNM. He currently teaches design studios and seminars that focus on research-based design methodologies within rapidly urbanizing cities and regions. His research centers on the social and economic networks, transportation systems, and infrastructure that inform urban development and public space, and places a special interest in housing patterns within the Global South.
The presentation will offer curent preparations for the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games in Brazil as demonstration projects of familiar decision-making processes addressing urban conditions, within the urgent timetables and politics associated with these mega-events. Recently, urban centers in Brazil have experienced massive demonstrations protesting planning and government investment that favors the immediate game-mode over the long-term legacy of these events. Residents have expressed their frustration with the public funding of stadiums and transportation systems that cater to the anticipated influx (and departure) of tourists, rather than long-term investment in education, health care, and infrastructure within urban slums.
The immediate convergence of these two mega-events in Brazil creates a laboratory of accelerated change - offering an opportunity to study the changing roles of actors within contemporary Latin American urban conditions. Further, the shortcomings of current planning efforts and the social inequities that will result from these projects will further demonstrate the need for disciplinary reorientation in order to more effectively view and shape contemporary urban conditions.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Sept 12

Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar: Melanie Wetzel - Miskitu Bila Aisisna: Collecting Miskitu Language Resources

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: LAII Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII and University Libraries for a summative research presentation by Melanie Wetzel, a Richard E. Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar. The Miskitu Indians of the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua and Honduras have a unique history. Their geographic location on the outskirts of Spanish Colonial power resulted in the Miskitu being allied with British colonists. The Moravian Church was also influential in the region, converting large numbers of Miskitu to Moravian Christianity as early as the 1850's. The Moravian Church published bibles and hymnals in the Miskitu language, providing some of the earliest translations and linguistic studies of this indigenous language. During the Nicaraguan war of the 1980's, the Miskitu in large part comprised the counter-revolutionary forces that opposed the Sandinista Revolution. In their own language, their political party is known simply as Yatama, but in U. S. news and historical accounts, they are described as "Contra-revolucionarios" or simply, Contras. In the present, there are several political parties active the Miskitu regions, including the Yatama party, the Sandinista party, and even a combined Yatama-Sandinista party, promoting continuing peace in Nicaragua. Today, the Miskitu Indians have political autonomy within Nicaragua. From coastal ports, they work at sea as lobster divers. Other communities lie along the Rio Coco and Segovia, or the Wangki, as it is called in Miskitu language, a major waterway that provides a portion of the border between Nicaragua and Honduras. From Honduras to Nicaragua there are almost 300,000 native speakers of the Miskitu Indian language. Many stakeholders are currently involved in efforts to document, protect, and teach the Miskitu language, including the Universities of the Autonomous Regions of Nicaragua, Miskitu activists and linguists, and international scholars. Melanie Wetzel is originally from Kansas, and spent 13 years living in Honduras, Central America. During her time abroad, she graduated from the National Autonomous University of Honduras with a Law degree, and practiced for 6 years, as well as working as a journalist, translator and teacher. After returning to Kansas in 2009, she began graduate studies at the University of Kansas, and will be completing an M. A. in Latin-American Studies in 2014. Her interest in indigenous languages allowed her to receive Department of Education Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships (FLAS), to study Kaqchikel Maya and Miskitu as part of her graduate studies. Through funding for the LAII Greenleaf Visiting Library Scholar program, Ms. Wetzel will be reviewing and collecting materials in the Miskitu language, as well as other documentation of Miskitu history and culture, in order to preserve and teach the language.
Sponsors: LAII, University Libraries
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Sept 18

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Mexico & New Mexico - How We Historically Present the Agency of Indigenous Peoples

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Please join us for a unique professional development opportunity for K-12 educators. This workshop will consider the history of colonization in the Americas and the continued struggle of Indigenous Peoples of the region for agency, civil rights and sovereignty. Special presentations will be offered by Dr. Kimberly Gauderman, Associate Professor, UNM Department of History, and Dr. Glenabah Martinez, Associate Professor, UNM Department of Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies.
Dr. Gauderman will consider the myths surrounding the portrayal of the agency of early Indigenous Peoples of Mexico and the ongoing ramifications of those preconceptions. Dr. Martinez will discuss civil rights and Indigenous Peoples of New Mexico in the twentieth century.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public, but with priority given to K-12 educators. All educators in attendance will be provided with copies of relevant curriculum materials and certificates of professional development. The first 20 teachers will also receive a free copy of the teacher resource guide Rethinking Columbus. Refreshments will be provided to all. Due to limited resources and space, please pre-register by contacting Keira Philipp-Schnurer at (505) 277-7047 or kphilipp@unm.edu. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Sept 18

Exhibit: El Otro Chile - Opening Night Reception

Time: 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Location: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
Description: Join us for a free Chilean art exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture, music, and film. "El otro Chile" (The Other Chile) will showcase the visual art of Carlos Ruiz Lolas (Carulo), Sebastian Picker, Sylvia Ernestina Vergara and Roberto Matta. Additionally, the photographic exhibit "Andean Carnival," depicting an annual celebration in northern Chile, will be on display. The 45-minute documentary film "Las Mujeres del Pasajero" (The Women and the Passenger) will also be shown.
Sponsors: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, Cornerstones of Santa Fe, Latin American & Iberian Institute
Notes: All events are free and open to the public. This opening night reception will be followed by a range of film screenings throughout the month. For details, see the event flyer.
Sept 19

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Strategies to Create an Environment of Respect in the Classroom that Allows a Dynamic Learning Experience

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Truman Middle School (9400 Benavides SW, Albuquerque, 87121)
Description: This workshop will be about classroom management and how to connect with students' interests. The presenter, Gilberto Lobo, is very much involved in education and the place of the workshop will be his classroom. Teachers of dual language classrooms are particularly encouraged to attend.
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, LAII
Notes: The workshop will conducted primarily in Spanish. Participants will be provided with certificates of professional development. The workshop is free to attend, but please register beforehand by emailing cer.albuquerque@mecd.es. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Sept 20

Exhibit: El Otro Chile - Film Screening of "Sal"

Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Location: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
Description: Join us for a free Chilean art exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture, music, and film. "El otro Chile" (The Other Chile) will showcase the visual art of Carlos Ruiz Lolas (Carulo), Sebastian Picker, Sylvia Ernestina Vergara and Roberto Matta. This evening, the film "Sal" by Diego Rougier (114 min) will also be screened. The film will be shown in Spanish with English subtitles.
Sponsors: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, Cornerstones of Santa Fe, Latin American & Iberian Institute
Notes: All events are free and open to the public. Other, related films will be shown throughout the month. For details, see the event flyer.
Sept 21

Exhibit: El Otro Chile - Film Screening of "Aquí no estoy"

Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Location: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
Description: Join us for a free Chilean art exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture, music, and film. "El otro Chile" (The Other Chile) will showcase the visual art of Carlos Ruiz Lolas (Carulo), Sebastian Picker, Sylvia Ernestina Vergara and Roberto Matta. This evening, the film "Aquí no estoy" by Elisa Eliash (96 min) will also be screened. The film will be shown in Spanish with English subtitles.
Sponsors: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, Cornerstones of Santa Fe, Latin American & Iberian Institute
Notes: All events are free and open to the public. Other, related films will be shown throughout the month. For details, see the event flyer.
Sept 24

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Día de los Muertos - Skeletons & Cultural Literacy

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center - Domenici Education Building (1701 4th St. SW)
Description: Join the National Hispanic Cultural Center and the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute (LAII) as we explore the history of Día de los Muertos and consider the visible and dramatic role of skeletons within this important holiday.
This is a free professional development workshop for K-12 educators. Participants will learn how to integrate Día de los Muertos into their classrooms with this art- and literacy-based workshop. Certificates of professional development and copies of relevant curriculum materials will be provided.
Sponsors: National Hispanic Cultural Center, LAII
Notes: Given limited space and resources, all educators are asked to pre-register by contacting Keira Philipp-Schnurer at kphilipp@unm.edu or (505) 277-7047. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Sept 25

¡SOLAS Presents! FLAS Fellowship Recipients

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Location: LAII Conference Room
Description: Join SOLAS and the LAII to hear from Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship (FLAS) recipients Ailesha Ringer, Roxanne Blair and Fiorella Vera-Adrianzen, who will lead a panel discussion on the experience of studying Portuguese in Brazil and Kichwa in Ecuador. The FLAS fellowship is a program supported by the U.S. Department of Education that awards funding to both undergraduate and graduate students who are interested in studying less- commonly taught languages. This panel, comprised of three summer FLAS fellowship recipients, will highlight their personal experience through all phases of the FLAS beginning from the application process to the time each fellow spent abroad learning Portuguese and Kichwa (a Quechuan language).
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: For reference, see the SOLAS website or event flyer.
Sept 25

Honduras Speaking Tour with Ana Rivera: "Human Rights, Resistance and the Movement for Peoples Power in Honduras"

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: LAII Conference Room
Description: Join the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute (LAII) as we partner with SOLAS, UNM Peace Studies, Witness for Peace Southwest, and the Honduran Solidarity Network to welcome Ana Gabriela Rivera, a 25-year-old resistance leader from the organization Los Necios based in Honduras' capital, Tegucigalpa. Ana will speak on her formative experiences in the organization as well as the current conditions in Honduras, providing a firsthand account of the resistance movement in Honduras. In her words: "This November 24, 2013, Hondurans will head to polls, just over four years after a brutal coup ousted elected President Manuel Zelaya on June 28, 2009. In the past four years Hondurans have experienced severe repression from brutality in breaking up peaceful protests to the straightforward assassinations of political leaders including 104 peasant cooperative leaders in the Aguan Valley, 59 lawyers, 39 journalists, 99 LGBQT activists, and dozens of unionists and teachers. Yet Hondurans have organized an unprecedented resistance movement in all sectors of the nation. The Honduras Solidarity Network is calling on people nationwide to stand for free and fair elections in Honduras without US interference."
Sponsors: LAII, SOLAS, Witness for Peace Southwest, Honduran Solidarity Network, UNM Peace Studies
Notes: For reference, see the event flyer.
Sept 26

LAII Lecture Series: Frances Hayashida - Water, Land, and Empire in the Ancient Andes

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Dr. Frances Hayashida, an archaeologist and an Associate Professor of Anthropology and a faculty affiliate with the Latin American and Iberian Institute at UNM. Before coming to UNM, she held research fellowships at Dumbarton Oaks and the Technische Universität München and taught at the University of Virginia, Penn State, and the University of Missouri. Her research focuses on the political economy and political ecology of Andean states and empires, and her areas of interest include agriculture and water management, craft production, and beer brewing. She currently co-directs a project on agriculture and empire in the high-altitude Atacama Desert with colleagues from the Universidad de Chile and the Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain).
This presentation will examine how in the past as in the present, water is a valuable and contested resource in arid environments. While large irrigation systems can be built and managed from the bottom-up by farmers, they are vulnerable to takeover by politically powerful entities. These dynamics are explored in two regions of the Andes, the Peruvian north coast and the high-altitude Atacama Desert in Chile. In both areas, local societies devised extensive and ingenious networks of canals and fields to create productive farmlands during late prehispanic times. In both areas, imperial conquest transformed water management, agriculture, and communities. Archaeology can provide a long-term historical and comparative perspective on what happens to local landscapes and livelihoods with incorporation into larger political economies.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Sept 26

Rudolfo and Patricia Anaya Lecture on the Literature of the Southwest: N. Scott Momaday

Time: 7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building, Grand Ballroom
Description: Thanks to a generous contribution from the renowned fiction writer Rudolfo Anaya and his late wife Patricia Anaya, the UNM English Department established the Rudolfo & Patricia Anaya Lecture on the Literature of the Southwest in 2010. The annual lecture series brings together students, faculty, and community members to address the rich traditions of Southwest literature and new directions in literary and cultural scholarship for our dynamic region. N. Scott Momaday is one of the most distinguished writers of our time. His first novel House Made of Dawn was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1969, an event that brought new visibility to American Indian literature and literature of the Southwest, a landscape that has inflected his fiction, poetry, and paintings for decades.
Sponsors: UNM Department of English with support from the Center for Southwest Research, Center for the Southwest, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of History, Feminist Research Institute, Honors College, Institute for American Indian Research, Latin American and Iberian Institute, and the Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Notes: For more information, visit the Department of English website.
Sept 27

Exhibit: El Otro Chile - Film Screening of "Tráiganme la cabeza de la mujer metralleta"

Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Location: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
Description: Join us for a free Chilean art exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture, music, and film. "El otro Chile" (The Other Chile) will showcase the visual art of Carlos Ruiz Lolas (Carulo), Sebastian Picker, Sylvia Ernestina Vergara and Roberto Matta. This evening, the film "Tráiganme la cabeza de la mujer metralleta"" by Ernesto Díaz (75 min) will also be screened. The film will be shown in Spanish with English subtitles.
Sponsors: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, Cornerstones of Santa Fe, Latin American & Iberian Institute
Notes: All events are free and open to the public. Other, related films will be shown throughout the month. For details, see the event flyer.
Sept 28

Exhibit: El Otro Chile - Film Screening of "Sal"

Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Location: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
Description: Join us for a free Chilean art exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture, music, and film. "El otro Chile" (The Other Chile) will showcase the visual art of Carlos Ruiz Lolas (Carulo), Sebastian Picker, Sylvia Ernestina Vergara and Roberto Matta. This evening, the film "Sal" by Diego Rougier (114 min) will also be screened.
Sponsors: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, Cornerstones of Santa Fe, Latin American & Iberian Institute
Notes: All events are free and open to the public. Other, related films will be shown throughout the month. For details, see the event flyer.
Oct 1

LAII Documentary Film Series: Realidades Indígenas Contemporáneas "Sariris, abriendo camino al andar" and "El poder de la memoria"

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: LAII Conference Room
Description: Join us for the first evening of the LAII's documentary film series exploring the realities and experiences of contemporary indigenous peoples of the Americas. This evening we will show two complementary documentaries, "Sariris, abriendo camino al andar" and "El poder de la memoria," both directed by Magdalena Cajías, historian, filmmaker, and former Minister of Education in Bolivia. The documentaries are in Spanish (no English subtitles); total duration is one hour. They will explore and explain the struggles of indigenous peoples of Bolivia through the following context: "En la década de los noventa, trabajadores de las minas, indígenas de tierras altas y bajas de Bolivia, productores de coca y distintos sectores populares lucharon contra las medidas neoliberales que se venían implementando desde 1985 y fueron construyendo una agenda de transformación confluyendo en la necesidad de una Nueva Constitución Política del Estado. Como no eran escuchados, caminaron hacia la sede de gobierno desde distintos lugares del país encontrando en su largo recorrido la solidaridad del pueblo boliviano. Su sacrificio fue fundamental para los nuevos tiempos que vive Bolivia." Discussion preceding and following the film will be led by LAII staff member Nelmy Jerez Morales and Dr. Ramiro Jordán, Associate Professor, UNM Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.
Sponsors: LAII, SOLAS
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer or complete series description.
Oct 2

LAII Documentary Film Series: Realidades Indígenas Contemporáneas "Amanece dignidad. Voces latinoamericanas frente al poder de las multinacionales"

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: LAII Conference Room
Description: Join us for the second evening of the LAII's documentary film series exploring the realities and experiences of contemporary indigenous peoples of the Americas. This evening we will show "Amanece Dignidad. Voces latinoamericanas frente al poder de las multinacionales" directed by Anna Castillo. The documentary is in Spanish (no English subtitles); total duration is 30 minutes. The documentary explores the struggles of indigenous peoples of Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela through the experiences of three women: "A Dominga en Bolivia, Gloria en Ecuador y Norquis en Venezuela se les prometió un futuro mejor cuando las empresas transnacionales llegaron a sus respectivos países, allá en la década de los noventa. Durante esta época en toda América Latina, la actividad de estas compañías iba asociada a promesas como el empleo, la competitividad, el aporte de tecnología y, en definitiva, el progreso ¡Se han cumplido estas promesas?, ¡qué ha representado la actividad de estas transnacionales para la calidad de vida de Dominga, Gloria y Norquis? Al contrario de lo esperado, las empresas transnacionales han originado fuertes impactos sociales y ambientales. Frente a estos Dominga, Gloria y Norquis se han organizado con su comunidad para defender sus derechos y para exigir otros modelos de desarrollo que les permita tener una vida digna. Este documental cuenta sus historias." Discussion preceding and following the film will be led by Dr. Cristobal Valencia, Assistant Professor, UNM Department of Anthropology, and Dr. Kimberly Gauderman, Associate Professor, UNM Department of History.
Sponsors: LAII, SOLAS
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer or complete series description.
Oct 3

LAII Documentary Film Series: Realidades Indígenas Contemporáneas - "Newen Mapuche, la fuerza de la tierra"

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: LAII Conference Room
Description: Join us for the third evening of the LAII's documentary film series exploring the realities and experiences of contemporary indigenous peoples of the Americas. This evening we will show "Newen Mapuche, la fuerza de la tierra" directed by Elena Varela. The documentary is in Spanish (no English subtitles); duration is two hours. This film explores and explains the struggles of the Mapuche of Chile through the following context: "Después de la muerte de Alex Lemún, la cineasta Elena Varela comienza a investigar las razones del conflicto entre el pueblo Mapuche y el Estado chileno. Así conoce a un dirigente mapuche clandestino que le entrega información sobre el conflicto y los motivos que tuvo su organización para tomar un camino propio, con una política relacionada con su cosmovisión y la pugna por recuperar sus tierras. Pero Elena es detenida, su película secuestrada y ella es acusada, en un montaje judicial, y condenada a 15 años de cárcel." Discussion preceding and following the film will be led by Linda Calderón Marina, a Chilean scholar, and Scott Crago, doctoral student in the UNM Department of History.
Sponsors: LAII, SOLAS
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, see the event flyer or complete series description.
Oct 3

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Stitching Resistance: The History of Chilean Arpilleras

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Art Museum Lobby, 1701 4th St. SW
Description: Join the National Hispanic Cultural Center (NHCC) and the UNM Latin American & Iberian Institute for a free professional development workshop for K-12 educators on Thursday, October 3, 2013 from 5:00 - 8:00 p.m. Nearly 40 years ago the armed forces of Chile overthrew the administration of Salvador Allende. That day, September 11, 1973, created the necessary conditions for the art form known as arpilleras. These textiles became the most visual (and visible), poignant, and widespread manifestation of opposition to authoritarianism, violation of human rights and the disappearance of loved ones associated with the military government that ruled Chile until 1990.
This professional development workshop will explore the history of Chilean arpilleras and their relevance to New Mexico's K-12 classrooms. Participants will receive copies of pertinent curriculum materials and certificates of professional development. In addition, the workshop will entail a private tour of the NHCC exhibition "Stitching Resistance: The History of Chilean Arpilleras" led by Dr. Tey Marianna Nunn, NHCC Visual Arts Director, and a special presentation by Dr. Elizabeth Hutchison, Chilean historian and Associate Professor of History at the University of New Mexico.
Sponsors: LAII, National Hispanic Cultural Center
Notes: Due to limited space and resources, all participants must pre-register for this free workshop by contacting Keira Philipp-Schnurer at the LAII: (505) 277-7047 or kphilipp@unm.edu. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Oct 4

Panel Discussion and Book Signing: Spain's Great Untranslated

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Location: UNM Student Union Building, Mirage-Thunderbird
Description: Join the Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque and UNM Latin American and Iberian Institute for a panel presentation and book-signing for Spain's Great Untranslated, a collection of twelve contemporary Spanish masters whose dazzling work has been unavailable to the English-language world. Exploring scenes ranging from the devastating Madrid subway bombing to the idyllic coastline of Greece, in rhapsodic poetry and anguished prose, these writers demonstrate the breadth and depth of the country's literary scene. Edited by Javier Aparicio, Aurelio Major, and Mercedes Monmany, these new English translations of great Spanish poetry, fiction, and memoirs provide an unrivaled view of Spanish writing today.
This panel presentation will include Javier Aparicio, editor; Ignacio Martín de Pisón, author; and Anne McLean, translator. Dr. Santiago Vaquera-Vásquez from the UNM Department of Spanish & Portuguese will moderate the panel. A book-signing will follow the presentation.
Spain's Great Untranslated was produced by "Words without Borders," an organization which "promotes cultural understanding through the translation, publication, and promotion of the finest contemporary international literature. Their publications and programs open doors for readers of English around the world to the multiplicity of viewpoints, richness of experience, and literary perspective on world events offered by writers in other languages. We seek to connect international writers to the general public, to students and educators, and to print and other media and to serve as a primary online location for a global literary conversation."
Sponsors: Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Oct 4

Exhibit: El Otro Chile - Film Screening of "Aquí estoy, aquí no"

Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Location: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
Description: Join us for a free Chilean art exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture, music, and film. "El otro Chile" (The Other Chile) will showcase the visual art of Carlos Ruiz Lolas (Carulo), Sebastian Picker, Sylvia Ernestina Vergara and Roberto Matta. This evening, the film "Aquí estoy, aquí no" by Elisa Eliash (96 min) will also be screened. The film will be shown in Spanish with English subtitles.
Sponsors: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, Cornerstones of Santa Fe, Latin American & Iberian Institute
Notes: All events are free and open to the public. Other, related films will be shown throughout the month. For details, see the event flyer.
Oct 5

Exhibit: El Otro Chile - Film Screening of "Tráiganme la cabeza de la mujer metralleta"

Time: 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Location: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe
Description: Join us for a free Chilean art exhibition featuring paintings, sculpture, music, and film. "El otro Chile" (The Other Chile) will showcase the visual art of Carlos Ruiz Lolas (Carulo), Sebastian Picker, Sylvia Ernestina Vergara and Roberto Matta. This evening, the film "Tráiganme la cabeza de la mujer metralleta"" by Ernesto Díaz (75 min) will also be screened. The film will be shown in Spanish with English subtitles.
Sponsors: El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe, Cornerstones of Santa Fe, Latin American & Iberian Institute
Notes: All events are free and open to the public. Other, related films will be shown throughout the month. For details, see the event flyer.
Oct 7

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In October we're reading The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano by Sonia Manzano.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America and Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2013-2014 Selected Titles.
Oct 14

K-12 Exhibition: LAII Día de los Muertos Ofrenda

Time: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center (1701 4th St. SW)
Description: Every year the National Hispanic Cultural Center (NHCC) hosts approximately two dozen altars in celebration of Día de los Muertos. These altars, or ofrendas, are on display in the Education and Performing Arts buildings at the NHCC. This will be the second year that the LAII has sponsored and created an ofrenda to serve as an exhibition for K-12 teachers and community members. We invite you to visit the NHCC to see the LAII's ofrenda and the many other beautiful altars on view. The display of ofrendas runs from October 14 through November 3. On November 1, the NHCC will host a despedida event to invite community members to tour the ofrendas, enjoy music, eat traditional foods, and share their personal and heartfelt memories.
Sponsors: National Hispanic Cultural Center, LAII, and the many other community partners who create the ofrendas for the display.
Notes: The complete exhibition, including the final despedida event, is free and open to the public.
Oct 17

K-12 Educator's Workshop: National Parks as an Educational Resource

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: National Hispanic Cultural Center, Domenici Education Building, Spanish Resource Center (1701 4th St. SW)
Description: Join us for a free professional development workshop for K-12 educators. The workshop will be led by Paloma Ramírez, biology teacher at Nuestros Valores Charter School, Albuquerque, NM. National Parks are a simple educational resource available to all levels and areas, not only through school trips but also as a source for activities, teacher training, lesson plans, etc. Specific programs such as "Teacher Ranger Techer" and official web pages provide an important tool for teachers.
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, LAII
Notes: The workshop will conducted primarily in Spanish. Participants will be provided with certificates of professional development. The workshop is free to attend, but please register beforehand by emailing cer.albuquerque@mecd.es. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Oct 23

LAII Lecture Series: Ronda Brulotte - Oaxacan Mezcal and the Making of a Transnational Prestige Commodity

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Dr. Ronda Brulotte, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and a faculty affiliate with the Latin American and Iberian Institute (LAII) at UNM. She holds a PhD in cultural anthropology and an MA in Latin American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests focus on global tourism, art and material culture, and the politics of food and heritage in Mexico. She is currently working on a second book project that deals with the production of Oaxacan mezcal for a transnational consumer market.
This talk will address the sociologically complex field of production, marketing, consumption, and connoisseurship surrounding Oaxacan mezcal as it emerges within the global market. Mezcal is an alcoholic spirit made by distilling the fermented juice from agave, a spiky-leafed member of the lily family that is related to the century plant--the same plant used to produce tequila. However, while tequila has enjoyed vast commercial success at home and abroad since the 1970s, until the late 1990s mezcal remained a regional drink, produced on a relatively small scale for local consumption, and was virtually unknown outside of Mexico. Mezcal from the southern state of Oaxaca is currently undergoing a dramatic transformation into a high-end, prestige commodity that is now produced for export to the U.S., Europe, South Africa, and Japan.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Oct 23

ISI Conference: Cultures of Exile: Conversations on Language & the Arts

Time: 9:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Location: Varying Locations (Hodgin Hall, Pearl Hall)
Description: Join the International Studies Institute (ISI) for the conference "Cultures of Exile: Conversations on Language and the Arts," which was inspired by the music of Georges Moustaki (1934-2013), especially his song "Le Métèque" (1969). In "Le Métèque" Moustaki dealt with outsiders, strangers, and all those who do not share one homogeneous place of origin. What does it mean to be a "métèque," an exile, an outsider today? Although often associated with loss and victimhood, exile can also foster artistic freedom, creativity, renewal, and empowerment. What is the role of the new place in the development of one's artistic oeuvre? How does the memory of original sounds, visual images, and physical places inflect one's creative voice? Many of our New Mexico students have personal experiences of exile and relocation. Through presentations and discussions, we will examine how personal and national tales of loss and adversity, transformed through the artist's medium, can become powerful testimonies of the human condition. Distinguished speakers include the writers Shirley Geok-Lin Lim (from Malaysia, teaching at UC Santa Barbara), Kébir Ammi from Paris (originally from Morocco), Liana Theodoratou (from Greece, teaching at NYU), Karen Elizabeth Bishop (from the UK, teaching at Rutgers University), and historian Devin Naar, U. of Washington (with ancestors from Salonica, Greece). Speakers from UNM and the Albuquerque community include Diane Thiel, Vera John Steiner, Manuel Montoya and his panelists, Angus Fletcher and Constantine Hadjilambrinos. Commentators include Diana Rebolledo, Natasha Kolchevska, Les Field, Laura Matter and Walter Putnam.
Sponsors: Organized by the International Studies Institute and the Department of Foreign Languages & Literature, with support from campus partners including Latin American & Iberian Institute; Spanish and Portuguese Department; Art & Art History Department; Tamarind Institute; Peace Studies Program; Feminist Research Institute; School of Architecture and Planning; Anderson School of Management; Office of Graduate Studies; Global Education Office; Offices of the Provost, Vice President for Research, and Vice President for Student Affairs; and the UNM Bookstore. Additional support from community partners was provided by the National Hispanic Cultural Center, Hispano Chamber of commerce, Colorado European Union Center for Excellence, Modern Greek Studies Association, among others.
Notes: For information, please see the ISI website. All events are free and open to the public.
Oct 24

¡SOLAS Presents! Joseph Sorrentino "Los Chileros: The Chile Pickers"

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Location: LAII Conference Room
Description: Join SOLAS, the Graduate Art Association, and the Spanish Portuguese Graduate Student Association at the Latin American & Iberian Institute for a special presentation by photographer and journalist Joseph Sorrentino.
Joseph Sorrentino tells stories. Expressed through photographs and news articles, these stories are about the lives that we do not see or hear about often: those who harvest the food we eat. Sorrentino's visual and verbal narratives speak of the experiences of migrant workers in chile farms in southern New Mexico. Most of the workers make little more than $25 daily and sleep in shelters whose facilities lack basic comforts such as adequate bathrooms and beds. As migrant laborers, their employment fluctuates with the daily demand for labor. Living a precarious existence, they wake up at dawn to wait on the streets of border towns hoping a contractor will select them. If they are not chosen to work or the contractor doesn't arrive, they oftentimes return to the shelter to wait for the next day.
These are the stories of chile farmers who are exposed to the uncertain realities of our international economic system. Yet Sorrentino's photographs don't dramatize their situations or convey misery or injustice felt on behalf of the workers; rather they focus on portraying the blunt realism that relates to these working conditions: survival and hope.
Sorrentino's images are evidence that the food on our table has a narrative of its own. These images are of people trying their hardest to get by on what little they earn. The photos reveal to us that mechanized tractors don't harvest these agricultural products; rather the hands of migrant workers pick them. Sorrentino's work demands that we not forget that behind most fenced off farm areas, that before these chiles reach the produce aisle, there is someone on the other side, laboring, subsisting and hoping for a better day to come.
Sponsors: Graduate Art Association, Spanish and Portuguese Graduate Student Association
Notes: Please see the SOLAS event page for more information here.
Oct 24

ISI Conference: Cultures of Exile: Conversations on Language & the Arts

Time: 10:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Location: Varying Locations (Hodgin Hall, UNM Bookstore, Pearl Hall)
Description: Join the International Studies Institute (ISI) for the conference "Cultures of Exile: Conversations on Language and the Arts," which was inspired by the music of Georges Moustaki (1934-2013), especially his song "Le Métèque" (1969). In "Le Métèque" Moustaki dealt with outsiders, strangers, and all those who do not share one homogeneous place of origin. What does it mean to be a "métèque," an exile, an outsider today? Although often associated with loss and victimhood, exile can also foster artistic freedom, creativity, renewal, and empowerment. What is the role of the new place in the development of one's artistic oeuvre? How does the memory of original sounds, visual images, and physical places inflect one's creative voice? Many of our New Mexico students have personal experiences of exile and relocation. Through presentations and discussions, we will examine how personal and national tales of loss and adversity, transformed through the artist's medium, can become powerful testimonies of the human condition. Distinguished speakers include the writers Shirley Geok-Lin Lim (from Malaysia, teaching at UC Santa Barbara), Kébir Ammi from Paris (originally from Morocco), Liana Theodoratou (from Greece, teaching at NYU), Karen Elizabeth Bishop (from the UK, teaching at Rutgers University), and historian Devin Naar, U. of Washington (with ancestors from Salonica, Greece). Speakers from UNM and the Albuquerque community include Diane Thiel, Vera John Steiner, Manuel Montoya and his panelists, Angus Fletcher and Constantine Hadjilambrinos. Commentators include Diana Rebolledo, Natasha Kolchevska, Les Field, Laura Matter and Walter Putnam.
Sponsors: Organized by the International Studies Institute and the Department of Foreign Languages & Literature, with support from campus partners including Latin American & Iberian Institute; Spanish and Portuguese Department; Art & Art History Department; Tamarind Institute; Peace Studies Program; Feminist Research Institute; School of Architecture and Planning; Anderson School of Management; Office of Graduate Studies; Global Education Office; Offices of the Provost, Vice President for Research, and Vice President for Student Affairs; and the UNM Bookstore. Additional support from community partners was provided by the National Hispanic Cultural Center, Hispano Chamber of commerce, Colorado European Union Center for Excellence, Modern Greek Studies Association, among others.
Notes: For information, please see the ISI website. All events are free and open to the public.
Oct 25

ISI Conference: Cultures of Exile: Conversations on Language & the Arts

Time: 10:00 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Location: Varying Locations (Hodgin Hall, National Hispanic Cultural Center)
Description: Join the International Studies Institute (ISI) for the conference "Cultures of Exile: Conversations on Language and the Arts," which was inspired by the music of Georges Moustaki (1934-2013), especially his song "Le Métèque" (1969). In "Le Métèque" Moustaki dealt with outsiders, strangers, and all those who do not share one homogeneous place of origin. What does it mean to be a "métèque," an exile, an outsider today? Although often associated with loss and victimhood, exile can also foster artistic freedom, creativity, renewal, and empowerment. What is the role of the new place in the development of one's artistic oeuvre? How does the memory of original sounds, visual images, and physical places inflect one's creative voice? Many of our New Mexico students have personal experiences of exile and relocation. Through presentations and discussions, we will examine how personal and national tales of loss and adversity, transformed through the artist's medium, can become powerful testimonies of the human condition. Distinguished speakers include the writers Shirley Geok-Lin Lim (from Malaysia, teaching at UC Santa Barbara), Kébir Ammi from Paris (originally from Morocco), Liana Theodoratou (from Greece, teaching at NYU), Karen Elizabeth Bishop (from the UK, teaching at Rutgers University), and historian Devin Naar, U. of Washington (with ancestors from Salonica, Greece). Speakers from UNM and the Albuquerque community include Diane Thiel, Vera John Steiner, Manuel Montoya and his panelists, Angus Fletcher and Constantine Hadjilambrinos. Commentators include Diana Rebolledo, Natasha Kolchevska, Les Field, Laura Matter and Walter Putnam.
Sponsors: Organized by the International Studies Institute and the Department of Foreign Languages & Literature, with support from campus partners including Latin American & Iberian Institute; Spanish and Portuguese Department; Art & Art History Department; Tamarind Institute; Peace Studies Program; Feminist Research Institute; School of Architecture and Planning; Anderson School of Management; Office of Graduate Studies; Global Education Office; Offices of the Provost, Vice President for Research, and Vice President for Student Affairs; and the UNM Bookstore. Additional support from community partners was provided by the National Hispanic Cultural Center, Hispano Chamber of commerce, Colorado European Union Center for Excellence, Modern Greek Studies Association, among others.
Notes: For information, please see the ISI website. All events are free and open to the public.
Oct 30

LAII Lecture with Laura Carlsen: "A War on Women": U.S.-Backed Drug Wars in Mexico and Central America

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join the LAII and the Americas Program for a presentation by Laura Carlsen with Araceli Rodríguez. Carlsen is director of the Americas Program in Mexico City, an organization whose premise is "A new world of action and communication for social change." For more, see the organization's website.
Currently traveling to select universities in the US, Carlsen will visit UNM to present on the gender violence associated with the drug war. She will travel and co-present with Araceli Rodríguez, a mother who lost her son in the drug war and who has become a leader within the organization Movement for Peace with Justice and Dignity. Carlsen holds a B.A. in Social Thought and Institutions from Stanford University and a Masters degree in Latin American Studies, also from Stanford. In 1986 she received a Fulbright Scholarship to study the impact of the Mexican economic crisis on women and has lived in Mexico City since then. She has published numerous articles and chapters on social, economic and political aspects of Mexico and recently co-edited Confronting Globalization: Economic integration and popular resistance in Mexico, and co-authored El Café en Mexico, centroamerica y el caribe: Una salida sustentable a la crisis.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Oct 30

Public Interview with Composer Mario Lavista: "Fifty Years of Musical Intersections with the Arts"

Time: 6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.
Location: Willard Room, Zimmerman Library
Description: Join the UNM Latin American Music Center and LAII for a public interview with Mario Lavista, internationally-renowned Mexican composer, pianist, intellectual, editor, and teacher. Lavista is regarded as a central figure in the contemporary music scene of his native country Mexico. A prolific composer of orchestral, stage, chamber, solo, and electronic pieces, his oeuvre is characterized by its intersections with the other arts. His music shows an integration of modernist avant-garde trends of both European and American music, while adopting compositional techniques of diverse historical periods of Western art traditions. He has maintained an active performance career, especially in collective improvisations using prepared piano.
Sponsors: UNM Latin American Music Center and the LAII, among many others.
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about this event and to see a complete schedule of other events at UNM involving and honoring Mario Lavista, see the UNM College of Fine Arts website.
Nov 1-30

Exhibition: Guatemalan Culture Through Images and Artifacts

Time: Regular Operating Hours
Location: Los Griegos Public Library, 1000 Griegos Rd. NW
Description: The LAII, in partnership with Instituto Cervantes of Albuquerque and the Los Griegos Public Library, is sponsoring an exhibition on Guatemala throughout the month of November. The exhibit explores Guatemalan culture through vivid photography of Día de los Muertos in Guatemala and hands-on artifacts produced in or focused on the country. The photography in the exhibit is subtitled "In Memoriam" and is the work of New Mexico photographer Steven St. John. In Memoriam explores the ways individuals and cultures choose to celebrate life by honoring and remembering those who have died. Photographed over the past several years, it is a collection of photographs of Día de los Muertos in the highlands of Guatemala. Día de los Muertos, also known as Day of the Dead or All Saints' Day, is celebrated in the Hispanic world between October 31 and November 2.
Sponsors: LAII, Instituto Cervantes, and Los Griegos Library
Notes: This complete exhibit of photography and artifacts is on view at the Los Griegos Public Library until November 30, 2013. Visitors may view it during normal operating hours. For reference, see the exhibit flyer.
Nov 4

LAII Vamos a Leer Book Group

Time: 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Location: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd NW
Description: Each month educators, teachers, librarians and community members from all over Albuquerque come together at our wonderful local bookstore, Bookworks, to discuss young adult books related to Latin America. All of the books featured in the Vamos a Leer book group are chosen for their representations of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinos in the United States. In November we're reading Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco X. Stork.
Sponsors: LAII, Bookworks
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the book group and relevant resources, visit the LAII's blog, Vamos a Leer: Teaching Latin America and Literacy. For a reference, see a list of 2013-2014 Selected Titles.
Nov 5

¡SOLAS Presents! FRG Recipients: Andrew Bernard and Grant Florian

Time: 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Location: LAII Conference Room
Description: "Urban Acequias and the Desert Oasis: An exploration of Integrated Water Infrastructure in Mendoza, Argentina"
Andrew Bernard is a M.A. student in Landscape Architecture (2014) at the University of New Mexico. His studies have focused on the integration of infrastructure, nature, culture and water as a means to resilient design in arid regions. He finds that Albuquerque's existing municipal water infrastructure is outdated and needs to shift from a single-purposed perspective system to one that integrates these elements and connects cities instead of dividing them. As a FRG recipient, Andrew was granted the opportunity to explore a successful example of integrated infrastructure in the arid region of Mendoza, Argentina for the month of July, 2013.
Mendoza is a city located at the foothills of the Andes mountains and while well known for its exquisite Malbec wine, it is best known as a desert oasis. This identity is supported by an intricate network of acequias or irrigation channels that run along each street providing irrigation for the vibrant street tree canopy that provides a refuge from the sun. In addition to providing irrigation, the acequias integrate storm water capture and function as linear public spaces that connect the city, fostering social and cultural exchange. Andrew's presentation, "Urban Acequias and the Desert Oasis: An Exploration of Integrated Water Infrastructure in Mendoza, Argentina" examines the function, significance, and benefits of the acequia system in Mendoza and illuminates the lessons that can be applied toward an alternative water infrastructure paradigm in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
"Socio-poltics of Ubandaime"
Grant Florian is a M.A. student in Anthropology (2014) at UNM and has been researching the blending of two syncretic Brazilian religions: Umbanda and Santo Daime. Umbanda is a religion that formed in Rio de Janeiro in the early 20th century as a blend of esoteric mediumistic practices from Europe, which in Brazil are associated with what is referred to as Kardecismo, popular Catholicism, and Afro-Brazilian religion. Santo Daime formed during the same period in the Amazon region of Brazil, and centers around the ritual consumption of ayahuasca accompanied by dance, song, or meditation. Originally Santo Daime was chiefly a rural, mixed race religious practice, but around the 1970's many middle class urban Brazilians -many of European descent but of varied ethnic backgrounds- brought the religion to cities like Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro.
Umbanda, on the other hand, has always attracted members from all social classes, but has chiefly been an urban religious practice. Now there are practitioners of both Umbanda and Santo Daime who are blending these two syncretic religions in a variety of ways, and this is connected to a broader movement toward spiritual eclecticism in urban Brazil's middle class. In the summer of 2013, Grant traveled to São Paolo where he conducted field research at two Santo Daime churches and three Umbanda centers. His presentation discusses his field experience and how it connects to broader social trends in Brazilian society.
Sponsors: LAII, SOLAS
Notes: Light refreshments will be provided. For more information about LAII and Tinker Foundation Field Research Grants, click here. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Nov 7

LAII Lecture Series: Rebecca M. Schreiber - Refusing Disposability: Collaboration and Representational Strategies in Maquilápolis: City of Factories

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Dr. Rebecca M. Schreiber, Associate Professor in the American Studies Department and faculty affiliate with the Latin American and Iberian Institute (LAII) at UNM. She is the author of Cold War Exiles in Mexico: U.S. Dissidents and the Culture of Critical Resistance (University of Minnesota Press, 2008). Her current book project Migrant Lives and the Promise of Documentation examines contemporary immigration issues in the United States through forms of visual representation. Specifically, she explores how Mexican and Central American migrants have depicted themselves and their communities through documentary photography, film, and video since 9/11.
In her paper Schreiber discusses how Maquilápolis narrates a critique of the way in which women workers are positioned as "objects of labor" within the maquiladoras, while also challenging the conventions of documentary film. The film highlights the multinational corporations' treatment of women workers as "objects of labor" through the promotoras "performing" the monotonous movements from their workplaces. These staged performances also denaturalize more conventional documentary segments, including the video diaries, highlighting them as representational strategies. Funari, De La Torre and the promotoras thus disrupt the claims to self-representation as truth, instead positioning the video diaries, documentary and staged sequences each as representational strategies.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Nov 14

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Hacia un aprendizaje creativo de la literatura: ejercicios para profesores de español / Creative Writing in Spanish

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: Agua Fría Elementary School, Santa Fe
Description: Join us for a free professional development workshop for K-12 educators. The workshop will be led by Juan Rodríguez.
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, LAII
Notes: The workshop will be conducted primarily in Spanish. Participants will be provided with certificates of professional development. The workshop is free to attend, but please register beforehand by emailing cer.albuquerque@mecd.es.
Nov 20

LAII Lecture Series: Ray Hernández-Durán - Towards an Architectonics of the Colonial City: Performance, Space, and Meaning

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: LAII Conference Room
Description: Join us for a special presentation with Dr. Ray Hernández-Durán, Associate Professor in the Department of Art and Art History and faculty affiliate with the Latin American and Iberian Institute (LAII) at UNM. Hernández-Durán completed his doctorate in prehispanic and colonial Latin American art history at the University of Chicago in 2005. In addition to undergraduate and graduate courses on colonial art history, he teaches classes on Baroque arts and architecture, African art, and Museum Studies, as well as seminars on critical theory, visual culture, and professional practices. This presentation will consider how much of the recent scholarship on the city in the colonial Ibero-American context focuses on the structure or design of viceregal cities, on representations of urban spaces, such as seen in maps and in painting, and/or on the kinds of performances that were conducted in colonial city streets and plazas. By combining semiotics, specifically via the semiological propositions in Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogical theory, with recent developments in space theory and performance studies, this lecture aims to define a broader theoretical framework for the study of colonial space that will present a more unified analysis of cities in the Americas during the viceregal period. This approach takes into consideration indigenous ideas about urban planning, and the negotiation of the space and meaning of pre-existing cities with Iberian concepts and the demands of the new socio-political order. The spatial palimpsests that resulted functioned on numerous signifying levels in terms of historical indexing, imperial politics, institutional ideologies, and social regulation. Based on a paper delivered at the College Art Association conference in 2008 for the panel, 'The Latin American City,' this lecture will consider two Novohispanic case studies: a viceregal entry into Mexico City and a funerary ceremony for the archbishop of Puebla.
Sponsors: LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For reference, please see the event flyer.
Nov 21

K-12 Educator's Workshop: Implementación de los programas bilingües a través de actividades intercurriculares / Intercurricular Activities in Dual Language Programs

Time: 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Location: Agua Fría Elementary School, Santa Fe
Description: Join us for a free professional development workshop for K-12 educators. The workshop will be led by Noé Carrero Torres from Atrisco Heritage Academy in Albuquerque, NM.
Sponsors: Spanish Resource Center of Albuquerque, National Hispanic Cultural Center, UNM Continuing Education, New Mexico Public Education Department, LAII
Notes: The workshop will be conducted primarily in Spanish. Participants will be provided with certificates of professional development. The workshop is free to attend, but please register beforehand by emailing cer.albuquerque@mecd.es.
Dec 4

SOLAS Brown Bag: FLAS Fellowship Information and Help Session

Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Location: Latin American & Iberian Institute Conference Room
Description: Please join us at the LAII to learn the details about the FLAS (Foreign Language and Area Studies) Fellowship application process. This help session will provide valuable information regarding application instructions and FLAS expectations, and will answer frequently asked questions.
Sponsors: SOLAS, LAII
Notes: This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please see the FLAS Call for Applications.