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Conferences: 2013

A Richard E. Greenleaf Symposium on Latin America:
Authority and Identity in Colonial Ibero-America

Background | Agenda | Program | Panel Descriptions | Panelists & Moderators | Acknowledgments | Podcasts

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Background

Date:  Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - Thursday, April 11, 2013

Location:  University of New Mexico Student Union Building, Lobo A & B

Sponsors:  Latin American & Iberian Institute

Description:  "Authority and Identity in Colonial Ibero-America" is a two-day, interdisciplinary symposium which brings to UNM eight prominent colonial scholars from History, Art History, and Literary and Cultural Studies for an interdisciplinary dialogue. Their talks examine the meanings that indigenous, European, and Creole peoples produced in their festivals, rituals, codices and chronicles, legal dictates and practices, their bodies, and the very space they built and inhabited. With a constant focus on authority, presenters will discuss the complexity of colonial subjects' interactions with each other and the particularly colonial identities that emerged from these interactions. Panel titles are "Documenting & Structuring Knowledge outside of European Forms," "Contesting and Redefining Imperial Subjectivities," "Disciplining and Reinscribing the Body," and "Shaping and Performing Urban Space." Afternoon sessions will be followed by an opportunity for extended dialogue with the panelists. The symposium is made possible by Dr. Richard E. Greenleaf's generous endowment to the LAII and the LAII's US Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center grant.

Note: All panels will be held in the UNM Student Union Building (SUB), Lobo A & B. The entire conference is free and open to the public; no registration required.

Agenda

The agenda is available for download: Authority and Identity in Colonial Ibero-America agenda

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

9:30-10:00 a.m.: Introductions and Welcoming Remarks

  • Susan Tiano, Latin American & Iberian Institute, University of New Mexico
  • Kathryn McKnight, Latin American & Iberian Institute, University of New Mexico

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Panel I: Documenting & Structuring Knowledge Outside of European Forms

  • Mónica Díaz, Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Georgia State University
  • Kevin Terraciano, Department of History, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Moderator: Kimberly Gauderman, Department of History, University of New Mexico

12:00-1:00 p.m.: Lunch Break (on your own)

1:00-3:00 p.m.: Panel II: Contesting and Redefining Imperial Subjectivities

  • Alcira Dueñas, Department of History, Ohio State University
  • Lisa Voigt, Department of Spanish & Portuguese, Ohio State University
  • Moderator: Judy Bieber, Department of History, University of New Mexico

3:00-3:15 p.m.: Coffee Break

3:15-5:00 p.m.: Interdisciplinary Dialogue & Closing Remarks

  • Moderator: Kathryn McKnight, Latin American & Iberian Institute, University of New Mexico

Thursday, April 11, 2013

9:30-10:00 a.m.: Introductions and Welcoming Remarks

  • Susan Tiano, Latin American & Iberian Institute, University of New Mexico
  • Kathryn McKnight, Latin American & Iberian Institute, University of New Mexico

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.: Panel III: Disciplining and Reinscribing the Body

  • Cristina Cruz González, Department of Art, Graphic Design & Art History, Oklahoma State University
  • Peter Sigal, Department of History, Duke University
  • Moderator: Kathryn McKnight, Latin American & Iberian Institute, University of New Mexico

12:00-1:00 p.m.: Lunch Break (on your own)

1:00-3:00 p.m.: Panel IV: Shaping and Performing Urban Space

  • Guadalupe García, Department of History, Tulane University
  • Stephanie Kirk, Department of Romance Languages & Literatures, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Moderator: Ray Hernández-Durán, Department of Art & Art History, University of New Mexico

3:00-3:15 p.m.: Coffee Break

3:15-5:00 p.m.: Interdisciplinary Dialogue & Closing Remarks

  • Moderator: Suzanne Schadl, Inter-American Studies Program University Libraries, University of New Mexico

Program

The symposium program is available for download: Authority and Identity in Colonial Ibero-America program. For reference, it includes complete panel descriptions, including individual presentation titles and abstracts, and biographical statements on all presenters.

Panel Descriptions

The conference consists of four two-hour length panels, each involving two presentations from visiting scholars and moderation by a UNM faculty member.

Panel 1: Documenting & Structuring Knowledge Outside of European Forms

  • Following the publication of Ángel Rama's La ciudad letrada (1984), many scholars worked from the premise that writing entered the "New World" as the instrument of authority and domination. The vision that divides colonial society and knowledge systems into a European lettered city and an illiterate colonized population that recorded knowledge only in oral traditions has become increasingly challenged and nuanced since Elizabeth Boone and Walter Mignolo's Writing without Words (1994). This panel further explores the expansion of notions of literacy to the practices of knowledge-keeping by indigenous and mestizo communities long considered illiterate, where, in fact, writing emerged early in the colonial period, in conjunction with other material media of record keeping and knowledge production, such as map-making and cord-knotting, as communities constructed the local and contested state authority.

Panel 2: Contesting and Redefining Imperial Subjectivities

  • Colonial governments and peninsular and Creole elites defined hierarchies of power and authority based on European ideologies and forms. In negotiating access to power and responses to authority, indigenous and mestizo subjects responded, not with wholesale adoption of these European ideologies and forms, but rather through affirmation of indigenous forms and constructed subjectivities that did not conform to the ideal molds into which colonial authorities would fit them. Even Creole subjects in fringe colonial regions constructed American identities and subjectivities, rather than reiterate Imperial ones in baroque festivals. This panel explores identity formation by educated Creole, indigenous, and mestizo subjects as they engaged, negotiated, and accommodated European modes of governance and culture.

Panel 3: Disciplining and Reinscribing the Body

  • This panel examines the limits of the imperial project to colonize indigenous and female bodies and to make them perform European values and to exalt imperial centrality. When European ecclesiastics sought to control the sexuality of the Empire's new subjects they imposed the ideological equation of sex with sin. Scholars have overemphasized the Church's success. As the Church sought to bolster its authority among the colonial populace by promoting piety, some women took up modes of Imitatio Christi that paradoxically threatened Catholic orthodoxy. This panel explores the meanings that imperial subjects gave to their sexual practices and ritual presentation of bodies, how the former resisted European control, and how subjectivity within the colonial sphere was constructed, controlled, and countered.

Panel 4: Shaping and Performing Urban Space

  • Institutions of the monarchy and the Church in colonial Ibero-America constructed their authority through the definition and visual language of urban spaces. In doing so, they sought to regulate social activity, promote peninsular ideals and reinforce imperialist and masculine hierarchies of power. Groups from all social sectors debated, contested, and transformed these ideals. This panel explores specifically how local elites debated the value of the meanings imposed from above and how they negotiated authority through the practices and visual languages of urban space in Colonial New Spain and the Caribbean, in newspapers, patriotic societies and female convent communities.

Panelists and Moderators

The LAII welcomes as panelists the following professors from across the United States.

The following UNM faculty from the Departments of Art and Art History, History, Inter-American Studies, and Spanish and Portuguese will join the conference sessions as moderators.

Acknowledgments

Dr. Greenleaf

A distinguished scholar of colonial Latin America, Dr. Richard E. Greenleaf (1930-2012) had an extensive career in teaching, research, and service. He has been called "one of the most influential historians of colonial Latin America" (Schwaller, 2008) with a sphere of influence that extends across international borders. Reflecting upon Dr. Greenleaf, Susan Tiano (Director of the Latin American & Iberian Institute) said, "He had such a tremendous impact on not only colonial studies but also Latin American Studies writ large. He dedicated his life to scholarship, teaching, mentoring, and Latin American Studies administration. There is no doubt that his legacy will continue to make a difference and inform Latin American Studies." In part, his lasting effect will continue at the University of New Mexico through a generous endowment to the LAII which guarantees the LAII the ability to regularly hold an annual conference on Latin America. In 2013, the LAII honors this gift by organizing "Authority and Identity in Colonial Ibero-America," the second "Richard E. Greenleaf Symposium on Latin America." The first conference was held in 2011 and addressed "Africans and Their Descendants in the Early Modern Ibero-American World."

Planning Committee

The following UNM faculty provided significant input throughout the planning process: Judy Bieber, Associate Professor, Department of History; Dr. Kimberly Gauderman, Associate Professor, Department of History; Dr. Ray Hernández-Durán, Department of Art & Art History; Dr. Kathryn J. McKnight, Department of Spanish & Portuguese; and Dr. Suzanne Schadl, Inter-American Studies Program, University Libraries. LAII staff oversaw conference logistics, with indispensible support provided by LAII Graduate Assistant Ailesha Ringer.

Sponsorship

The symposium is made possible by Dr. Richard E. Greenleaf's generous endowment to the LAII and the LAII's US Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center grant.

Podcasts

The panel sessions were audio recorded and are available for download as podcasts. Please click the images below to listen.

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