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Academics: Current: Graduate Dual Degrees

UNM offers five dual degree programs for Latin American Studies:

These dual degree programs allow students to earn a MALAS and another advanced degree with fewer credit hour requirements than would be required if the degrees were pursued separately. A student must be admitted by both programs and recognized by UNM as a dual degree student. With the exception of the dual degree with Law, both degrees must be completed within the same semester.

Interested students are required to submit application materials to both departments involved in the dual degree. For information on the application process for LAS, please see information on application guidelines. Once admitted, students work with advisors from both programs and are expected to adhere to the policies and deadlines of both programs. The Associate Director maintains a list of core and elective courses that may be taken to fulfill the 42 hour MPH component of the dual degree.

MALAS/MBA

Offered jointly with the Anderson School of Management, this dual degree program is designed to train management professionals with special expertise in Latin America. The dual degree reduces requirements to complete the two degrees by approximately 12 hours, to a minimum of 57 hours and a maximum of 72 hours past the Bachelor's, depending on the number of waivers granted by Anderson School for core requirements.

Competency in Spanish or Portuguese is required for admission to the dual degree. Applicants must meet entrance requirements for both programs; applications should be submitted simultaneously to both programs.

For the Latin American Studies component, students are required to complete 24 credit hours, including a minimum of 9 hours in each of the two chosen areas of concentration (see above). The remaining 6 hours are divided between LTAM 510 (Pro-Seminar in Latin American Studies) and either thesis hours (under Plan I) or electives (under Plan II). Students must also fulfill the seminar and language requirements (see above).

In order to meet the MBA requirements, a student must complete 48 credit hours of study, unless the student is eligible to waive some of the courses. If waivers are granted by Anderson School, a total of 33 credit hours must be completed.

MBA core requirements include MGT 501, 502, 504, 506, 508, 511, 520, 522, 526, and 598. Students must complete 30 hours of core courses or be waived from these courses (with the exception of MGT 598). Students must also complete 18 hours of elective management courses.

There are two fellowships that are available specifically for MALAS/MBA dual degree students: Bank of America MALAS/MBA Fellowship and Wells Fargo MALAS/MBA Fellowship. Both fellowships provide $2000 for one year and can be renewed.

MALAS/MCRP

The joint master's program in Latin American Studies and Community and Regional Planning is designed for students who are interested in the professional practice of planning in a Latin American context.

The Community and Regional Planning program at the University of New Mexico is dedicated to planning and advocating for sustainable communities and ecosystems throughout the Southwest region and Latin America. MALAS/MCRP graduates possess the knowledge and skills necessary to support planning by diverse human communities throughout the Western Hemisphere.

MALAS/MCRP students learn to assist Latin American communities to create community-based plans and programs that sustain and enhance their culture, resource base, built environment and economic vitality. The program promotes participatory processes that respond to community identities and development needs.

Prerequisites to the program are competence in either Spanish or Portuguese (at least two years of undergraduate course work or equivalent language training) and basic course work in economics (micro and/or macro) and statistics. Deficit courses in economics and statistics may be made up after admission to the program.

The program requires a minimum of 54 credit hours of graduate credit (compared to 72 credit hours if the two degrees were pursued separately). The required graduate credit hours include: 1) CRP 578, a 3 credit hour bridge seminar; 2) 22 credit hours of course work and thesis in Community & Regional Planning; 3) 24 credit hours of course work in Latin American Studies; and 4) 5 elective credit hours of either CRP or LTAM graduate course work.

For the 22 credit hours in Community and Regional Planning, students must complete CRP 500, 510, 511, 545 (or 580), 588, and 599.

For the 24 credits hours in Latin American Studies, students must complete a minimum of 9 hours in each of the two areas of chosen concentration (see above). The remaining 6 hours are divided between LTAM 510 (Pro-Seminar in Latin American Studies) and electives.

Each candidate is required to prepare a thesis (Plan I). The Master's examination will consist of an oral examination at the final presentation of the thesis; this examination will include coverage of the student's two areas of concentration in Latin American Studies. The student's Committee on Studies, comprised of at least two faculty members in one area of concentration and one faculty member from the second area of concentration, preside over the examination.

Students must complete a minimum of 6 credits in graduate seminars numbered 500 or above (excluding 551 or 552 Problems courses). Students should consult with the Associate Director to determine which courses are considered seminars. Students must also fulfill the language requirement (see above).

MALAS/JD

This dual degree program with the School of Law is intended to prepare legal professionals for work in Latin America or with Latino populations in the United States by combining legal training with Latin American language and area studies. The program enables students to develop professional skills directly applicable to Latin American nations and populations.

Prerequisites to the program are competence in either Spanish or Portuguese (at least two years of undergraduate course work or equivalent language training). The program requires 80 credit hours of Law course work that must include 9 credit hours of international law, 24 credit hours of Latin American Studies course work, and a stand-alone 3 credit hour elective course containing subject matter linking Law and Latin American Studies.

The first-year Law curriculum consists of required courses that emphasize methods of legal reasoning, policy analysis, and the analysis of legal institutions. During their second and third years, students can choose from approximately 100 elective courses in developing individualized programs suited to their career goals.

The Latin American Studies component requires that students complete a minimum of 9 hours in each of the two areas of chosen concentration (see above). The remaining 6 hours are divided between LTAM 510 (Pro-Seminar in Latin American Studies) and electives.

Students must complete a minimum of 6 credits in graduate seminars numbered 500 or above (excluding 551 or 552 Problems courses). Students should consult with the Associate Director to determine which courses are considered seminars. Students must also fulfill the language requirement (see above).

To meet the exit requirements for the Latin American Studies component, students must:

  • sit for the comprehensive examinations in both areas of concentration. The examinations are administered by a Committee on Studies composed of two faculty members from each concentration; or
  • sit for a comprehensive examination in one area of concentration and complete an article length professional paper (jointly supervised by one member of the Law faculty and one non-Law Latin American-specialized faculty member) in the student's other area of concentration.

MALAS/MALLSS

The Latin American Studies program and the College of Education's Department of Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies offer a dual degree program leading to master's degrees in Latin American Studies and Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies.

This program is intended to allow education professionals to enhance their secondary school teaching with Latin American topics in the humanities and social sciences.

The program combines advanced professional development in education with advanced interdisciplinary study of Latin America and is designed to help students integrate the two fields through coordinated advisement and bridge courses.

The program requires 51 credit hours of course work for students who hold teaching certificates. It includes three components:

  • 21 credit hours of Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies courses with a concentration in social studies.
  • 21 credit hours of Latin American Studies course work with at least 9 hours in each of the two areas of chosen concentration (see above). The remaining 3 hours are dedicated to LTAM 510 (Pro-Seminar in Latin American Studies).
  • 9 credit hours of bridge courses.

Students must complete a minimum of 6 credits in LAS-related graduate seminars numbered 500 or above (excluding 551 or 552 Problems courses). Students should consult with the Associate Director to determine which courses are considered seminars. Students must also fulfill the language requirement (see above).

All students follow Plan II (non-thesis) and are required to sit for the comprehensive examinations in both areas of their LAS concentration. The examinations are administered by a Committee on Studies composed of two faculty members from each concentration.

MALAS/MPH

The Master of Arts in Latin American Studies and Masters of Public Health dual degree program is intended to prepare graduates to improve the health of Latin American populations and Latino populations in the United States, with a primary focus on New Mexico, the Southwest, the United States/Mexico border region, and regions south of the border. It supplements the MPH program with in-depth study of languages, cultures, and societies that will help prepare graduates to work effectively either in Latin America, or with Latin American immigrant populations within the United States.

The dual degree requires 63 graduate credit hours, as compared to the 78 hours of graduate credits required to complete the two degrees separately. A minimum of 42 hours is required in Public Health courses, and a minimum of 21 hours is required in Latin American Studies courses. At least 13 hours of the MPH component must have significant content related to Latin America or Latin American immigrant communities in the United States, to enable the student to integrate the content and practice of the two degrees.

Applicants for the dual degree program must apply separately to and meet the entrance requirements of each program. Preference is given to students who have public health experience, which may be in community development, research, health education, health science, health promotion, or other health-related work. Experience can be paid or voluntary.

The MPH component of the dual degree requires a minimum of 42 credit hours as follows:

  • PH 501, 502, 506, 508, 511, 513, 538, and 552;
  • PH 507, 533, or 555;
  • MPH studies with Latin American Studies content (13 credit hours) as follows: PH 579, 583; 596 or 597; 598; and Public Health courses with Latin American Studies/U.S. Latino content or courses throughout the university with demonstrated content on Health and Latin America (3 credit hours);
  • Related electives (10 credit hours) to complete the 42 credit hour MPH requirement: Must include 3 credit hours of shared Public Health/Latin American Studies content.

Courses that may be taken as shared content electives, depending on specific content when taught, include PH 560; CJ 550, 553, 555; SOC 540, 595. Students may seek approval from the MPH Program Director and the LAII Associate Director to count other graduate courses with demonstrated health and Latin American content toward their elective hours. Students are strongly encouraged to discuss with their Public Health advisor their particular interests, for example: policy, management, or epidemiology, and relevant courses offered throughout the University.

Coursework for the MALAS component of the dual degree includes a minimum of 9 graduate credit hours in each of two areas of concentration. The remaining 3 graduate credits for LAS are dedicated to the required Pro-Seminar (LTAM 510). Of the total 21 hours for LAS, students must complete at least 6 hours of graduate seminar course credits.

Exit requirements for the dual degree include a comprehensive examination in one area of concentration in Latin American Studies, a master’s exam in Public Health and either PH 596 Professional Paper or PH 597 Public Health Integrative Experience. The integrative experience of the professional paper must address a public health topic related to Latin America or Latin American populations in the U.S. A committee of 3 faculty members, including at least one Latin American Studies faculty member from outside the MPH program, will supervise the professional paper.